Pop Culture

[Historic Bars] San Francisco’s Vesuvio Cafe

Posted on: February 26th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: Vesuvio Café in San Francisco.

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Vesuvio Café was founded in 1948.

Writer Henry Miller once wrote to Jack Kerouac, saying that he enjoyed The Dharma Bums and would like to meet the younger author in person. Kerouac agreed, and they arranged to meet one night in 1960 in Big Sur, along California’s central coast.

But the night of the meeting, Kerouac never made it out of San Francisco. Instead, he spent his evening at Vesuvio Café.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

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In this day of green screens, CGI, and other special effects techniques, it’s easy for filmmakers to fake reality. But when it comes to historic places, many of this year’s Oscar contenders opted for the real deal.

Below, we look at five Academy Award-nominated films that shot on-location at historic sites across the country.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

10 Iconic Movie Sets Starring … The Antiquities Act!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

An R2-D2 character visits Death Valley (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars"). Credit: Alyse & Remi, Flickr
An R2-D2 figure visits Death Valley National Park (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars").

The Antiquities Act may sound like a dusty old piece of legislation, a relic of a bygone era that long ago ceased to have relevance for average Americans. But you will spill your popcorn to learn that the Antiquities Act -- considered America’s first preservation law enacted in 1906 -- continues to play a critical role in protecting places across the country that have been featured in some of Hollywood’s best-known blockbusters.

From “Star Wars” to “Titanic,” from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” some of our most beloved movies were filmed in landscapes and historic sites protected by the Antiquities Act. "The Godfather: Part II," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," and "The Cider House Rules" are all Oscar winners and feature places protected by this little-known law which allow the President to permanently protect federally owned or controlled structures and lands.

On Thursday, February 19, the President will take direct action for the 14th time and establish a new National Monument from a portion of the Pullman Historic District in Chicago. The Pullman neighborhood was featured in the Oscar-winning movies "The Road to Perdition" and "The Fugitive," creating yet another link between great films and iconic American landscapes and historic sites.

Before you settle down this Sunday night to watch the stars walk the red carpet on their way to the 87th Academy Awards, enjoy nine more of our favorite places featured in motion pictures protected and recognized by the Antiquities Act of 1906 -- now including historic Pullman in Chicago!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Historic Bars] Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge

Posted on: February 18th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge in Nashville.

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Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge has been a hub for many Country Music legends such as Faron Young, Patsy Cline, Kris Kristofferson, and Loretta Lynn.

Picture this: It's Nashville, the bar is packed, the ‘shine is flowing, and the music is rocking.

Where are you? None other than Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge!

Tootsies is the most famous honky tonk on downtown Nashville’s Broadway. It has hosted and nurtured dozens of Country Music’s legends -- such as Faron Young, Charley Pride, Patsy Cline, and Loretta Lynn, to name a few -- and is responsible for grooming many of Music City’s stars of tomorrow. With such a reputation, Tootsies has become a legend in and of itself.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Cinema History: Saved, Lost, and Threatened NYC Movie Locations

Posted on: February 16th, 2015 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Georgette Blau, On Location Tours

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Now demolished, 5Pointz in New York City was featured in "Now You See Me" and "Rescue Me."

New York City is home to many famous historic landmarks, and it’s also the most filmed city in the world, with thousands of movies and TV shows being filmed here every year. The city is always changing, and some famous locations are threatened on a daily basis or have been demolished. But many more have been saved, preserving the entertainment and pop culture side of New York City, which is an important part of its history.

As the National Trust gears up for the Oscars on February 22, I've outlined some saved, demolished, and threatened sites well-known through movies and television. I'm very familiar with both movie locations and preservation, as I graduated from Skidmore College in 1996 with a degree in preservation, and in 1999 started On Location Tours to take tourists to these and other pop culture sites on a daily basis. Here are my highlights.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Historic Bars] Chicago’s Billy Goat Tavern

Posted on: February 12th, 2015 by David Weible

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: the Billy Goat Tavern in Chicago.

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The original Billy Goat Tavern moved to its current subterranean location just north of the Chicago River in 1964.

As if beer and cheeseburgers weren’t enough, Chicago’s Billy Goat Tavern also boasts barnyard animals, baseball curses, an SNL skit, and -- best of all -- a wall of fame for writers.

OK, there’s a chance I have my priorities a little mixed up, but no matter what order you put the above in, this joint’s a winner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.