Pop Culture

[Historic Bars] Duluth, Minnesota’s Tycoon Alehouse & Eatery

Posted on: January 30th, 2015 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

What's more fun than a historic bar? A historic bar with a theme! And that's exactly what we're featuring in our next installment of historic bars -- establishments with kitschy, unusual, and unique calling cards. Next up: Duluth's Tycoon's Alehouse & Eatery.

Tycoon's Alehouse sits in the fully restored 1889 Duluth City Hall

Tycoon's Alehouse sits in the fully restored 1889 Duluth City Hall

While its collection of trout streams, mountain bike trails, and ski hills – not to mention one of the largest bodies of fresh water on the globe -- have made Duluth, Minnesota an outdoorsman’s utopia, the city of some 80,000 isn’t lacking in history either.

Take its 1889 city hall.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Photos] Nashville’s Music Row: Keeping the Beat

Posted on: January 26th, 2015 by David Robert Weible

 

The National Trust has picked up in 2015 where it left off in 2014 and we're looking forward to another year of saving some of America's most important historic places. Read on for a peek at one of the Trust's newest National Treasures.

(You can also view the Music Row story on Exposure.)


Nashville's Music Row by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] The Safe House in Milwaukee

Posted on: January 23rd, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

What's more fun than a historic bar? A historic bar with a theme! And that's exactly what we're featuring in our next installment of historic bars -- establishments with kitschy, unusual, and unique calling cards. Next up: Milwaukee's Safe House

Moveable puzzle tiles on a wall in the Safe House’s interior rearrange themselves with the push of a button.

Moveable puzzle tiles on a wall in the Safe House’s interior rearrange themselves with the push of a button.

International spies. Secret missions. Espionage. Codes. Martinis that are shaken, not stirred.

If this all sounds like your idea of a fun Saturday night, head for Milwaukee’s Safe House -- but cover your tracks. The concealed bar and restaurant has been fulfilling patrons’ undercover dreams and serving up Wisconsin favorites like batter-dipped cheese curds since 1966, all under the guise of International Exports, Ltd. Ask a local for the password (you’ll need it after 8 p.m.) and go down an alley and through a nondescript door for a clandestine dining experience.

Once you’ve given the correct password and gained entrance through a secret passage, you'll be met in the Interpol Bar by a truly impressive collection of authentic spy memorabilia gathered by owner, David J. Baldwin over the years. A cell door from an actual KGB prison, a booth that hides diners from sight, and the Unique Martini -- a drink which is shaken (not stirred) by traveling 600 feet around the bar through a pneumatic tube -- are just a few of the distinctive features waiting to be discovered.

Visitors can explore the oak-paneled British Intelligence room and a red Hong Kong-themed section, with bamboo-hung booths modeled on fixtures that Baldwin saw at the Hong Kong Hilton Hotel. Framed James Bond posters line the walls, and signs that point toward “Agent Debriefing,” “CIA Cover Phone,” and other mysterious locations appear around every corner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

The Best of Preservation Magazine’s Transitions Department: 2014

Posted on: December 31st, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

The beauty of the Treadwell Pump House rivaled that of any other Transitions submission in 2014.
The beauty of the Treadwell Pump House in Juneau, Alaska, rivaled that of any other Transitions submission in 2014.

2014 is sadly -- or mercifully, depending on how you view it -- over. New opportunities, new adventures, and new stories are on the doorstep.

But before we get too excited for our leap into 2015, and the stories that will shape our year in preservation, it doesn’t hurt to take a look back at 2014.

Below, I’ve included some of my favorite pieces from Preservation magazine’s 2014 Transitions department, which catalogues places lost, saved, threatened, or restored from around the country. I hope you enjoy reading them as much as I enjoyed writing them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

Mildred Bennett established the Willa Cather Foundation and started the movement that has preserved structures in and around Red Cloud, Nebraska, that figure in the author's life and work. (right)Author Willa Cather lived just a short time in Red Cloud, Nebraska, but the prairie town and its citizens were the prototypes for her most famous works.

Left: Mildred Bennett established the Willa Cather Foundation and started the movement that has preserved structures in and around Red Cloud, Nebraska, that figure in the author's life and work. Right: Author Willa Cather lived just a short time in Red Cloud, Nebraska, but the prairie town and its citizens were the prototypes for her most famous works.

As the daughter of strict religious parents, Mildred Bennett was forbidden to do many things, including read fiction. But as an adult, she discovered the author Willa Cather, became one of the foremost authorities on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, and started a movement to preserve the town that inspired the author.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.