Pop Culture

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): Judas Priest (Rob Halford, K.K. Downing, Glenn Tipton, Ian Hill, and Dave Holland)
Venue: Mid-South Coliseum
Location: Memphis, Tennessee
Date: December 12, 1982
Memorable Moment: The absurd coordinated guitar playing/dancing of Downing and Tipton, sometimes joined by Halford when the mood struck him.
Show Vibe: Hey man, it was the ‘80s. (Thrusts thumb, index, and pinky fingers into the air.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] McCrady’s Restaurant in Charleston

Posted on: August 20th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

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McCrady's bar room -- formerly home to horses and stage coaches -- is covered by a skylight along its full length.

There’s something so undeniably charming about Charleston it almost makes your heart hurt. The key lime pie and the soft, salty kiss off the sea air are definitely part of it, but it’s the architecture and the attitude that make any trip to Charleston a travel through not just space, but time.

McCrady’s is the kind of place that makes this happen.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

14 End of Summer Reads for the Preservation Buff

Posted on: August 20th, 2015 by Gwendolyn Purdom 1 Comment

 

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After a summer packed with historic site visits and family roadtrip house museum detours, busy season is winding down for us preservation fans. But that’s no reason to slow our search for inspiring stories about saving places.

So, with your help, we’ve put together a list of favorites—new titles and classics—on history, architecture and the power of place to carry you into fall and beyond. Happy reading!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Gwendolyn Purdom

Gwendolyn Purdom

Gwendolyn Purdom is a former Preservation magazine editor and currently a writer, producer, and host at TouchVision TV in Chicago.

 

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Tiya Miles is the author of two books, a monograph called The House on Diamond Hill and a novel called The Cherokee Rose.

“Whenever I visit antebellum homes in the South, with their spacious rooms, their grand staircases, their shaded back windows that, without the thickly planted trees, would look out onto the now vanished slave quarters in the back, this is invariably my thought. I stand in the backyard gazing up at the windows, then stand at the windows inside looking down into the backyard, and between the me that is on the ground and the me that is at the windows, History is caught.” -- Alice Walker, quoted in The House on Diamond Hill

In 2011, Tiya Miles was awarded a MacArthur Genius Grant for her work connecting the histories of African and Cherokee people in Colonial America. I heard Miles speak this past spring at the National Council on Public History annual meeting in Nashville where she described the challenges of translating her historical monograph (a book that is based on a single subject) on the Chief Vann House into a fictional novel.

The monograph, The House on Diamond Hill, examines the racial and social complexities of Cherokee Chief James Vann’s plantation in Diamond Hill, Georgia, from its construction in the 19th century, through Cherokee removal in the 1830s, and  up to its transformation into a historic site in the 1950s. The second book, The Cherokee Rose, is a fictional account of a similar house.

The novel uses the home and its history to make connections between individual’s different interpretations of the past. Both books serve as a means to emphasize that history is not linear or finite. That multiple perspectives shift the way race, gender, and politics interact with one another on the ground.

In both books, “history is caught” and translated deftly by Miles in a way that is at times both recognizable and strange -- but also important to telling the whole story of this period in American history. I recently interviewed her to learn more about her work and her process in writing The Cherokee Rose.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

 

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Wildwood’s iconic and photogenic Caribbean Motel was the perfect location to host a gathering of vintage-loving guests.

Retro Roadmap hosted the first of what is hoped to be more Vintage Weekends, showcasing the mid-century motels and more of the shore town of Wildwood, New Jersey with a sold-out crowd attending from up and down the East Coast.

From the base camp at the iconic Caribbean Motel (built in 1957 by Lou Morey and listed on the National Register of Historic Places), the tiki-themed event combined vintage-inspired activities with modern social media sharing to increase awareness of and interest in the many facets of 1950s and ‘60s culture that still exist in this popular beach town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

[Summer Concert Series] B.B. King at the Regal Theater

Posted on: August 10th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): B.B. King (Leo Lauchie: bass, Duke Jethro: piano, Sonny Freeman: drums, Bobby Forte and Johnny Board: tenor sax)

Venue: The Regal Theater

Location: Bronzeville, Chicago

Date: November 21, 1964

Memorable Moment: The duration of Sweet Little Angel, It’s My Own Fault, and How Blue Can You Get? (Songs two, three, and four on the Live at the Regal album). If that series doesn’t stir something in you, you may not have a soul.

Show Vibe: Class and soul, all the way.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.