News Round-Ups

 

Welcome to a recently added feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The staff at Indiana Landmarks says #ThisPlacesMatters about the Indiana Landmarks Center.
The staff at Indiana Landmarks says #ThisPlacesMatters about the Indiana Landmarks Center.

"Yes, but in our architectural firm we felt increasingly uncomfortable with the obligation to constantly surpass ourselves. Then we embraced the theme of preservation. It requires intelligence, precision and creativity -- and there's no expectation that we'll be making a huge splash. Conversions are more about concepts than effects." Rem Koolhaas Interview: 'We Shouldn't Tear Down Buildings We Can Still Use' (Spiegel Online)

"To me, preservation is about celebrating the evolution of a building, and working to ensure it remains a viable part of its neighborhood, while maintaining (as best as possible) the historic integrity of the site." Celebrating Change: The Growth of a Kentucky Log House (Gardens to Gables)

"Historic preservation is a conversation with our past about our future. It provides us with opportunities to ask, 'What is important in our history?' and 'What parts of our past can we preserve for the future?'" The National Park Service & Historic Preservation (Yes, this is not really an article, but it's hard to resist the lovely new preservation website from our friends at the National Park Service.)

"Asheville's many breweries are popular gathering spots for cold beer and good conversation. But almost without exception, every brewery building here once had a different life. They were stores, a car dealership, an auto parts shop, a cinema, a movie studio and more. They had all been discarded before being reclaimed to make and sell beer." Where beer, history collide: Breweries give old buildings new life (Asheville Citizen-Times)

Bonus:
Follow #beersavesplaces on Twitter and Instagram for more stories and photos of breweries in historic buildings.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Weekend Reads from Architect, CityLab, and More

Posted on: May 8th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

By Tim Mikulski, Manager, Public Affairs

Welcome to a recently added feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The main waiting room at Penn Station, New York City, circa 1911.
The main waiting room at Penn Station, New York City, circa 1911.

“Richard Cameron and James Grimes of the architecture and design firm Atelier & Co., in Brooklyn, have developed a plan to rebuild New York City's old Penn Station in all its former glory. The original McKim Mead & White structure, which opened in 1910, was torn down in 1963 and replaced with the current underground station that serves 600,000 passengers a day.” CityLab: A 3-Part Plan to Rebuild New York’s Old Penn Station... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Weekend Reads from Baltimore Heritage, The Root, and More

Posted on: May 1st, 2015 by Sarah Heffern

 

Welcome to a new feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Sunset at Lyndhurst, a National Trust Historic Site, via @SavingPlaces  on Instagram.
Sunset at Lyndhurst, a National Trust Historic Site, via @SavingPlaces on Instagram.

"As we reflect on the events of the past few days in Baltimore, our thoughts are with those who are working to make our historic city a better place -- through pursuit of equal justice and the revitalization of historic neighborhoods." -- Baltimore Heritage: With our shared heritage, we are undaunted in working for Baltimore’s future

"A half-century after McJunkin died, his role in archeological history unknown, a Paleo-Indian archaeologist at Eastern New Mexico University named George Agogino learned the history of the Folsom site and finally gave McJunkin the credit he was due for the discovery of the bones that shifted the timeline of human settlement in North America." -- The Root: George McJunkin: How a Black Man’s Archaeological Discovery Changed History... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

The Best of Preservation Magazine’s Transitions Department: 2014

Posted on: December 31st, 2014 by David Weible

 

The beauty of the Treadwell Pump House rivaled that of any other Transitions submission in 2014.
The beauty of the Treadwell Pump House in Juneau, Alaska, rivaled that of any other Transitions submission in 2014.

2014 is sadly -- or mercifully, depending on how you view it -- over. New opportunities, new adventures, and new stories are on the doorstep.

But before we get too excited for our leap into 2015, and the stories that will shape our year in preservation, it doesn’t hurt to take a look back at 2014.

Below, I’ve included some of my favorite pieces from Preservation magazine’s 2014 Transitions department, which catalogues places lost, saved, threatened, or restored from around the country. I hope you enjoy reading them as much as I enjoyed writing them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

10 Preservation Wins in 2013

Posted on: December 30th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 9 Comments

 

For anyone worried that year '13 would prove unlucky for the beautiful places in our midst, take heart: Though we did lose some irreplaceable historic places this past year, we also celebrated a remarkable number of preservation wins throughout the country. Let's look back at some of 2013's biggest success stories and get inspired for the year ahead!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Preservation Round-Up: The Oldest Distillery in the U.S. Edition

Posted on: January 11th, 2013 by Emily Potter

 

blog_photo_Preservation Round Up_Distillery
The oldest distillery in the U.S., Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky.

Did You Know? -- Bricks + Mortar

“Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky is the oldest continually operation distillery in the US?* Its 130-acre facility includes 4 centuries of architecture that is well-maintained and fully operational!”

The Sweet Sound of Renovation: A Concert Hall Loft -- Apartment Therapy

“Adaptive reuse is one of the best forms of creative and eco-friendly construction. Whether it's a former school house or church, buildings with a past life often make for some of the most interesting homes and interiors. This social hall in New York City is no exception -- the 32-foot barrel arched ceilings, porthole windows, stage lighting and old wood floors make a for a one-of-a-kind residence.”

Cyclorama Building at Gettysburg Will Be Demolished -- Philly.com

“A 14-year battle over the fate of a modern structure at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park is over. The National Park Service said Thursday that it would begin demolishing the Cyclorama building as soon as February, clearing the site ahead of the 150th anniversary commemoration of the battle.”

Overdue Convenience of the Day: City Hall as Food Truck -- Atlantic Cities

“How did it take so long for this to happen? Boston's Brutalist City Hall building, designed by Paul Rudolph, may be the least popular City Hall in the country. It has only two stars on Yelp. And, like all government buildings, it is the site of bleak bureaucratic pilgrimages in search of forms and documents.”

A History of Home -- Sustainable Cities Collective

“We are often entrapped in the world of the now. We hardly ever look back, but it is surprising to find that once we do, we find the past is still lingers in every object around us. After having read Lucy Worsley's "If Walls Could Talk: An intimate history of the home," I look at my current spartan surroundings with a new appreciation.”

The Genius of Traditional Buildings -- Urban Indy

“Have you ever been to an old downtown and marveled at the historic buildings? Have you ever wondered how they could create such beautiful buildings on such small budgets, compared to the placeless architecture we are told is barely affordable today?”

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.