News Round-Ups

Weekend Reads from Curbed, The Buffalo News, and More

Posted on: August 28th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Friends of Memorial Coliseum from Brian Libby on Vimeo.

“The Veterans Memorial Coliseum, a massive modernist indoor arena in Portland, Oregon, is facing the ultimate existential crisis as City Council considers a demolition, partial upgrade, or total restoration (which could cost $65M more than the project budget.) Meanwhile, a community organization called Friends of Memorial Coliseum has been mounting a strong case for preserving the structure. Their argument, now articulated in a thorough sub-three-minute video, boils down to the building's architectural and cultural significance.” -- Curbed: To Save or to Raze – SOM’s Modernist Arena in Portland

“An art deco train station opened here to nationwide acclaim during the Great Depression, built by two renowned railroad architects a mile and a half from downtown. The station’s use peaked during World War II, but as trains gave way to planes and automobiles, the station fell into disuse and disrepair. That changed about 20 years ago, when Cincinnati turned the architectural marvel into the city’s largest cultural attraction – the renamed Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal...Many people in Buffalo yearn for that same outcome at the city’s Central Terminal. Both art deco stations share much in common, such as the same architects, Alfred T. Fellheimer and Steward Wagner, and the decline up to and after Amtrak left both stations in the 1970s. But that’s where the similarities end.” -- The Buffalo News: Transforming An Old Rail Station Into a Vital Cultural Center

“A national monument designation would mark the significance of this place where our 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt, developed a keen appreciation and respect for our country’s remarkable natural and cultural beauty. Roosevelt’s passion for the outdoors is now a part of our culture and his enthusiasm is embraced and shared by naturalists and Americans throughout our country. The vision for Elkhorn Ranch that we presented to the Billings County Commission is a proposal for congressional designation of a national monument managed by the U.S. Forest Service that would recognize all valid existing rights and traditional land uses like hunting, grazing and ranching.” -- The Bismarck Tribune: Setting the Record Straight on Elkhorn Ranch National Monument

“These days, buyers want new houses or those in move-in condition, preferring a bigger mortgage to a large rehab budget, local agents said...There is a market for older homes ‘as long as they are updated and in good condition,’ [Real Estate Office Owner John] Duffy said. Yet he said that if a property is ‘registered historic,’ most municipalities limit the changes that can be made and require prior official approval, which can scare off buyers. Most sellers understand that buyers want the house to be updated or ‘they will either walk away or come in with a very low offer,’ he said.” -- The Philadelphia Inquirer: Demand for Historic Houses Not What It Was

“When embarking on a campaign to save a historic resource, it is very important to document and share your progress. Otherwise, people won’t know what you are doing! In this post, we will look more closely into why documenting your campaign is important and share lessons we have learned from our ongoing campaign to save the James River from Dominion Virginia Power’s proposed transmission line project near historic Jamestown.” -- Preservation Leadership Blog: Down to The Wire – The Importance of Documenting Your Campaign

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Weekend Reads from Marketplace, WAVY-TV, and More

Posted on: August 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

150821_blog_photo_weekend-reads
HOPE Crews are working around the country as you read this blog post. Below, learn more about this project at Lincoln’s Boyhood home.

“The 21-year-old from Pennsylvania is in a group of five other millennial-aged apprentices serving as part of the Minnesota Conservation Corps, part of AmeriCorps. Through the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Hands-On Preservation Experience (HOPE) [Crew], they are at the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial in Spencer County for two weeks to complete the restoration of 14 of 32 church pews in the Abraham Lincoln Hall of the national park’s visitor center. After years of tours, community events and weddings, the decades-old pews are in need of restoration.” Evansville Courier & Press: Conservation youth teams helping restore Lincoln parks... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Weekend Reads from Citinerary, Curbed, Forward, and More

Posted on: August 14th, 2015 by Sarah Heffern No Comments

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Joseph McGill at South Carolina's Magnolia Plantation, during one of his early slave cabin stays.
Joseph McGill at South Carolina's Magnolia Plantation, during one of his early slave cabin stays.

"So far, Mr. McGill, whose ancestors were enslaved in Williamsburg County in South Carolina, has slept in more than 70 slave dwellings in 14 states, alone or in groups as large as 30, with the descendants of slaves sometimes lying alongside descendants of slave owners. This weekend, he is doing his first overnight stays in New York State, bedding down on three historic properties on eastern Long Island, in some of the region’s most beautiful (and expensive) resort areas." New York Times - Confronting Slavery at Long Island’s Oldest Estates

Note: Joe began his Slave Cabin Project while working in the National Trust's Charleston Field Office, and documented the experience here on the PreservationNation blog.

"So not only are the spaces rad, the tenants they have are equally as awesome. As I spent more time photographing their spaces, and getting the know the tenants, I realized that First + First is doing more than just renovating abandoned buildings, they’re making space for people, like myself, to pursue their dreams and passions." Citinerary - Giving abandoned buildings a creative purpose - First + First... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Weekend Reads from CityLab, Atlas Obscura, Daily Mail, and More

Posted on: August 7th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

by Tim Mikulski

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Pershing Park at 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C. The park is named after John J. Pershing, the General of the Armies during World War I.
Pershing Park at 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C. The park is named after John J. Pershing, the General of the Armies during World War I.

“Late last year, Congress authorized a new National World War I Memorial for Washington, D.C. Just last month, that memorial took its first step toward becoming a reality. But there’s a hitch: The site that legislators picked out for the monument is already home to a World War I memorial. Predictably, the plan has sparked a skirmish over the best way to remember the War to End All Wars.” CityLab -- How Many World War I Memorials Does One Park Need?

“It has been submerged in water for more than 80 years. But now, following this summer's record drought, 60 per cent of Lake Mead has dried up, revealing entire buildings that disappeared decades ago. And tourists are flooding in. The reservoir -- America's largest -- is home to St Thomas, an Old West town which was lost in 1938 when the government built a dam to create a lake.” Daily Mail -- Astonishing drought unveils lost Wild West town that has been submerged under Nevada's Lake Mead for the most part of 80 years... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Weekend Reads from Time, Solar City, Smithsonian, and More

Posted on: July 31st, 2015 by Sarah Heffern

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Archaeological work in process at Jamestown.
Archaeological work in process at Jamestown

"Jamestown’s original fort is perhaps the most archaeologically fertile acre in the United States. In 1994, Bill Kelso, a former head archaeologist at Monticello, put his shovel in the clay soil here and began unearthing the first of two million artifacts from the early days of the settlement. ... One firecracker revelation after another is now filling in the history of the first successful English colony in America." Smithsonian Magazine - New Jamestown Discovery Reveals the Identities of Four Prominent Settlers

"'Many people don’t realize that the ‘Deep Throat’ garage—where Mark Felt met with Woodward and Bernstein—is still a working parking garage in Arlington’s Rosslyn neighborhood,' says Andrew Terranova, concierge at Philadelphia’s Hotel Monaco, and the guide for the nearby Spirits of ’76 Ghost Tour. 'A historic marker has been placed outside.

'" Time - These Are America’s Best Cities for Historic Sites... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The Plaza Hotel, New York City
The Plaza Hotel, New York City

"The Plaza Hotel is one of the oldest and most famous buildings in the city, now over a hundred years old. For decades, it was the meeting place of Manhattan’s wealthiest socialites, and still remains, in some part, today. Most interesting to us though in its 100 year history are some of its most eye-catching secrets." Untapped Cities - The Top 10 Secrets of the Plaza Hotel in NYC

"The portico at Drayton Hall, the historic 18th-century house on the Ashley River, was repaired with large concrete beams sometime during the 20th century, but those in charge of caring for the museum house weren’t sure exactly when. But when workers recently began removing that concrete as part of a larger renovation project, they discovered a small piece of red paper. On it was printed a Nabisco logo, and Trish Smith, Drayton Hall’s curator of architectural resources, says that logo was used from 1923-41. As a result, the best estimate now places the portico repair no earlier than 1923 and not much later than 1941." Post and Courier - Decades later, a worker’s snack wrapper offers clue to Drayton Hall repair... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.