News Round-Ups

Weekend Reads from Time, Solar City, Smithsonian, and More

Posted on: July 31st, 2015 by Sarah Heffern No Comments

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Archaeological work in process at Jamestown.
Archaeological work in process at Jamestown

"Jamestown’s original fort is perhaps the most archaeologically fertile acre in the United States. In 1994, Bill Kelso, a former head archaeologist at Monticello, put his shovel in the clay soil here and began unearthing the first of two million artifacts from the early days of the settlement. ... One firecracker revelation after another is now filling in the history of the first successful English colony in America." Smithsonian Magazine - New Jamestown Discovery Reveals the Identities of Four Prominent Settlers

"'Many people don’t realize that the ‘Deep Throat’ garage—where Mark Felt met with Woodward and Bernstein—is still a working parking garage in Arlington’s Rosslyn neighborhood,' says Andrew Terranova, concierge at Philadelphia’s Hotel Monaco, and the guide for the nearby Spirits of ’76 Ghost Tour. 'A historic marker has been placed outside.

'" Time - These Are America’s Best Cities for Historic Sites... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The Plaza Hotel, New York City
The Plaza Hotel, New York City

"The Plaza Hotel is one of the oldest and most famous buildings in the city, now over a hundred years old. For decades, it was the meeting place of Manhattan’s wealthiest socialites, and still remains, in some part, today. Most interesting to us though in its 100 year history are some of its most eye-catching secrets." Untapped Cities - The Top 10 Secrets of the Plaza Hotel in NYC

"The portico at Drayton Hall, the historic 18th-century house on the Ashley River, was repaired with large concrete beams sometime during the 20th century, but those in charge of caring for the museum house weren’t sure exactly when. But when workers recently began removing that concrete as part of a larger renovation project, they discovered a small piece of red paper. On it was printed a Nabisco logo, and Trish Smith, Drayton Hall’s curator of architectural resources, says that logo was used from 1923-41. As a result, the best estimate now places the portico repair no earlier than 1923 and not much later than 1941." Post and Courier - Decades later, a worker’s snack wrapper offers clue to Drayton Hall repair... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Howard Johnson's in Lake George, New York
Howard Johnson's in Lake George, New York

"He believes in it because he's lived it, starting as a dishwasher three decades ago. And now he's running the business, 'which is something I never thought I would do in a million years. But here we are and we're doin' it. And I'm glad.' He's painstakingly preserved authentic details. 'It still feels like the original restaurant,' said Johnson." CBS Sunday Morning -- ​Visiting the last surviving Howard Johnson's

"Now, I have one more reason to love [my house]. On Friday, June 26, 2015, Sally Jewel, Secretary of the Interior, along with the National Park Service designated the “Henry Gerber House” at 1710 N. Crilly Court in Chicago’s Old Town Triangle a National Historic Landmark—only the second LBGT-related property to achieve this distinction. The Stonewall Inn in New York is the other one." Chicago Now -- My Old House ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Weekend Reads from USA Today, The Boston Globe, and More

Posted on: July 10th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week. This week we’ve rounded up stories on a few of our National Treasures, one of our historic sites, and our HOPE Crew initiative.

Nantucket Lightship. Credit: Johnathneric - On & Off/ Off & On, Flickr

“A 79-year-old floating lighthouse that once illuminated the passage for ships through the choppy waters of the Nantucket Shoals will shine its powerful main beacon this summer for the first time in 40 years. The owners of the Nantucket Lightship LV-112, the oldest ship of its kind and the largest ever built in the United States, will flip the switch on the ship’s beacon Aug. 7.” – The Boston Globe: Historic lightship to shine for first time since 1975

“The goal of the program, called HOPE Crew by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is to train youngsters on restoration skills. In Prince William Forest they are repairing windows and masonry at some of the cabins in the camping areas...’ The goal of the program is to engage young people in their National Parks that are close to them. We work on a lot of different scales on a lot of different projects, but at the end of the day it’s all historic preservation,’ said Monica Rhodes, associate director of HOPE Crew.” – NBC-4 TV Washington: HOPE Crew’s Forest Fix-Ups in Prince William County

“The New York State Pavilion was built by Philip Johnson for the 1964 World's Fair and subsequently abandoned to time. And though the fate of the famous structure was once in doubt, it is now definitely on the way to being saved and rebuilt... The Tent of Tomorrow was opened to the public for the first time in years at the 50th anniversary of the fair last spring. Now, the walls of the tent have been restored and this spring the crowd-funded New York State Pavilion Paint Project began to repaint the Pavilion's exterior ‘crown’ in bright yellow.” – Curbed: New York State Pavilion Is Being Restored to Its 1964 Colors

“The side of a building on Louisville's historic Whiskey Row collapsed after a large blaze erupted there Monday afternoon. Three buildings were damaged in the fire — 111, 113 and 115 West Main Street — all part of a project to redevelop the historic buildings into new lofts, retail and restaurant space called 111 Whiskey Row. The fire was reported at about 4:30 p.m. in the same block the Brown-Forman Corp. plans to create the Old Forester distillery experience. Those buildings were spared from damage in Monday's fire, according to one of the developers.” – USA Today: Fire Ravages Louisville’s Famed Whiskey Row

“A day after the tragic shooting at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, Drayton Hall director George McDaniel and his staff were still trying to comprehend the enormity of the event. Yet McDaniel, who is retiring in September after 26 years of overseeing Drayton Hall, still firmly believes that an understanding of history—both the good and the bad—has increasing relevance in today’s world and can bring people together to work through what he calls “troublesome” history.” – Preservation Leadership Forum Blog: Looking Back and Looking Forward at Drayton Hall with George McDaniel

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Weekend Reads] Preservation Stories from The New York Times, Thump, and More

Posted on: July 3rd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

150702_blog-photo_Pallisades
The Palisades are a National Treasure of the National Trust.

“’What preservation is really all about,’ the critic Ada Louise Huxtable noted almost 50 years ago, ‘is the retention and active relationship of buildings of the past to the community’s functioning present.’ Translation: Good preservation doesn’t embalm history. It binds a living past to change. ‘The accumulation,’ Mrs. Huxtable added, ‘is called culture.’ Replace buildings of the past with natural landmarks and you’ve got the LG story in Englewood Cliffs, N.J., which was resolved this week.” – The New York Times: LG Listens to Conservationists and Preserves a Landmark

“In July, the San Antonio Missions could become Texas’ first UNESCO World Heritage Site, but if it wasn’t for a small group of women in the 1920s, they may not have been standing today. More than 90 years since its founding, the San Antonio Conservation Society continues to work tirelessly to protect and preserve the city’s most valuable historic, natural and cultural assets.” – San Antonio Magazine: On A Mission... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week. In light of the announcement of our new list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places on Wednesday, this week's articles are about the list.

The Factory, West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Hunter Kerhart)
The Factory, West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Hunter Kerhart)

"As Confederate flags come down across the country in the wake of the Charleston shooting, some say that American history is threatened. But a list of endangered historic places released by a respected D.C.-based nonprofit points out that American history transcends that of straight white men -- and often gets overlooked." Washington Post - Here are America’s most endangered historic places

"This year’s winners -- er, losers? -- are diverse: There’s The Factory, an LA nightclub that first rose to prominence as a center for gay culture as Studio One in the 1970s that’s being threatened by condo developers (condo developers are a recurring theme here). Or A.G. Gaston Motel, in Birmingham, Alabama, which served as a meeting place and planning hub for civil rights activists, including Martin Luther King Jr. What about Oak Flat, a National Forest in Arizona that’s now being mined for ore, creating a two-mile-wide crater?" Gizmodo - Go Now, These 11 Historic Places May Soon Be Gone Forever

"The National Trust for Historic Preservation expressed concerns over uranium mining around the Canyon, proposed development near the South Rim and a proposed resort on the Navajo Nation near the park's eastern border. The group added Oak Flat campground to the list over concerns about a proposed Resolution Copper mine." The Arizona Republic - Grand Canyon, Oak Flat added to endangered list

"But in 1974 a gay Beverly Hills eye doctor turned the building into Studio One, which became one of the most celebrated nightclubs in the country. Stars such as Patti LaBelle and Liza Minnelli performed there, and more than 1,000 people would dance under its disco balls and strobe lights. Aside from the legendary parties, Studio One hosted some of the country's first AIDS fundraisers, with entertainers like Joan Rivers helping pack the house." The Advocate - Infamous WeHo Dance Palace On National Trust's Endangered List

"Mayor William Bell is embracing the new listing from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, saying the attention will help advance the city's $10 million plan to restore the building and convert the property into a museum and public policy center. The facility will be known as the Freedom Center." AL.com - Saving history: Birmingham's A.G. Gaston Motel named among nation's 11 most endangered historic places

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.