National Treasures

A Royal Visit to President Lincoln’s Cottage

Posted on: March 20th, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

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Prince Charles and Duchess Camilla speak with Erin Carlson Mast, executive director of President Lincoln's Cottage.

What’s more fun than visiting historic sites? Visiting them with the British Royal Family, of course.

As part of their four-day tour of the United States, Prince Charles and Duchess Camilla visited President Lincoln’s Cottage, a National Trust Historic Site, on Thursday morning.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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Villa Lewaro, home of self-made female entrepreneur Madam C.J. Walker.

March is Women’s History Month, a time when we as a nation reflect on the contributions, stories, and struggles of American women. It seems a bit strange -- given that we are over half the country’s population -- that women get just one month, but this is actually an improvement: Originally, it was Women’s History Week, and before that, only a few short decades ago, the only women whose stories made it into textbooks tended to be First Ladies.

Even now, twenty-eight years after Congress made Women’s History Month official, strides for women’s equality and recognition across the spectrum continue to lag behind. Preservation is no different. Over the years, we have not always done what we could to highlight and preserve places that tell the rich, diverse stories of American women.

So here at the National Trust -- where I am proud to serve as the first woman president and CEO -- we are working hard to save places that tell these stories, and help us to better understand who we are as a nation. And there are plenty of remarkable ones to be told!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

 

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African House is located on the grounds of Melrose Plantation, about 15 miles from Natchitoches, Louisiana.

On March 16, the National Trust for Historic Preservation announced the African House in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, as a National Treasure.

Located at the antebellum Melrose Plantation -- a National Historic Landmark -- the two-story hut is believed to have been built prior to 1820, although no records of construction remain. The structure is threatened by deterioration and destabilization, with preservation of the handmade bricks, hewed cypress roof beams, and other elements needed before it reopens.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

Big Win at Pullman Historic District, Now a National Monument!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

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The Administration Building's clock tower was restored after a 1998 fire.

Moments ago, President Obama designated a portion of Chicago’s Pullman Historic District a National Monument, making it the Windy City’s first unit of the National Park Service. The move comes after decades of work to protect and promote the historic neighborhood by community members and supporters who joined elected officials and the president himself to celebrate the announcement in the heart of Pullman this afternoon.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

10 Iconic Movie Sets Starring … The Antiquities Act!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

An R2-D2 character visits Death Valley (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars"). Credit: Alyse & Remi, Flickr
An R2-D2 figure visits Death Valley National Park (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars").

The Antiquities Act may sound like a dusty old piece of legislation, a relic of a bygone era that long ago ceased to have relevance for average Americans. But you will spill your popcorn to learn that the Antiquities Act -- considered America’s first preservation law enacted in 1906 -- continues to play a critical role in protecting places across the country that have been featured in some of Hollywood’s best-known blockbusters.

From “Star Wars” to “Titanic,” from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” some of our most beloved movies were filmed in landscapes and historic sites protected by the Antiquities Act. "The Godfather: Part II," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," and "The Cider House Rules" are all Oscar winners and feature places protected by this little-known law which allow the President to permanently protect federally owned or controlled structures and lands.

On Thursday, February 19, the President will take direct action for the 14th time and establish a new National Monument from a portion of the Pullman Historic District in Chicago. The Pullman neighborhood was featured in the Oscar-winning movies "The Road to Perdition" and "The Fugitive," creating yet another link between great films and iconic American landscapes and historic sites.

Before you settle down this Sunday night to watch the stars walk the red carpet on their way to the 87th Academy Awards, enjoy nine more of our favorite places featured in motion pictures protected and recognized by the Antiquities Act of 1906 -- now including historic Pullman in Chicago!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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The Palace of the Governors

Where do you think the oldest colonial-era building in the United States is located?

At first glance, you might assume that the oldest ones in the continental United States would be found somewhere near the Jamestown or Roanoke in Virginia, or in Massachusetts, near Plymouth, or other early English settlements along the eastern seaboard, right? The truth is, to find the truly oldest colonial buildings in the country, you need to look westward.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, is the oldest continuously inhabited state capitol in the United States. Founded in 1607 by New Mexico’s second Spanish Governor, Don Pedro de Peralta, as the “City of Holy Faith,” or “Santa Fe” in Spanish, the city has remained the capitol of the province of New Spain, the New Mexico Territory, and eventually the state of New Mexico, for more than 400 years now. And with a pair of structures both built in 1610, Santa Fe also boasts two of the nation’s oldest places: The San Miguel Mission and the Palace of the Governors.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.