National Treasures

[PHOTOS] Lost Relics of the 1964-65 World’s Fair

Posted on: May 30th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: Bill Cotter
The Eastman Kodak pavilion during the demolition process in the years following the 1964-65 World's Fair in Queens, N.Y.

What happens to a building that is no longer standing?

Sure, we know that the physical space that the structure once occupied is cleared, and that the debris gets carted away. But how do we remember a built space that we can no longer access, or that no longer exists? For many visitors at the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, N.Y., their memories only live on through souvenirs, photographs, and stories. Almost all of the fair’s roughly 150 pavilions are gone.

Below, we highlight popular 1964-65 World’s Fair sites that were either moved or demolished, or both.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Young Preservationist Focuses His Lens on Miami Marine Stadium

Posted on: May 14th, 2014 by Steven Piccione

 

Credit: Ivan Robles
Ivan Robles, right, a Miami native, hopes to be a liaison between the older generation that has grown up with the Miami Marine Stadium and the current generation.

Younger generations are vitally important for the continuation of historic preservation. That is why we at the National Trust responded enthusiastically to a request from Ivan Robles, a sophomore at Miami Beach Senior High School, to share his photographs of the Miami Marine Stadium, one of our National Treasures. We chatted with Ivan to learn how this unique space inspires him.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

CityLove: Chattanooga Edition

Posted on: May 7th, 2014 by Grant Stevens 2 Comments

 

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Credit: chattanoogafun.com
Chattanooga, Tenn., looking toward Lookout Mountain (center left). From left to right, the bridges are: the Walnut Street Bridge (with the Hunter Museum of American Art at its base), the Market Street Bridge (officially called the the Chief John Ross Bridge), and the P.R. Oligati Bridge. 

Last week, National Trust staff members attended the annual Vanguard gathering hosted by Next City in Chattanooga, Tenn., which is where we are headed for our next edition of CityLove!

While Vanguard attendees and the National Trust staff worked to “collectively learn and think about how to tackle the challenges our cities face," they also spent some time exploring the city.

Chattanooga hasn’t always been so beautiful. In 1969, the federal government declared that Chattanooga had the dirtiest air in the nation, and since then, the city has been on a mission to clean up its image. The road to recovery hasn't been easy (the city lost 10 percent of its population in the 1980s), but substantial private and public investment has turned Chattanooga around, earning it a new nickname -- "The Scenic City."

Now known for its many outdoor attractions like Lookout Mountain (not to mention its Incline Railway), the Raccoon Mountain Caverns, and Reflection Riding Arboretum and Botanical Garden, historic preservation is certainly part of the scenery as well.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

Historic Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Larger Impact of African-American Legacy

Posted on: April 30th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Jessica Pumphrey, Associate Manager of Public Affairs

Credit: S. Heffern, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Hinchliffe Stadium sat vacant for some 20 years until hundreds of volunteers recently repainted the historic venue.

Last week, we opened the doors of Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., to more than 700 volunteers in an effort to breathe new life into the iconic sports arena. Known for its role in Negro League Baseball, Hinchliffe Stadium was the home field for teams like the New York Black Yankees and the Newark Eagles. Legendary players like Larry Doby, Josh Gibson, Monte Irvin, and more, all graced the field not knowing that one day they’d receive the highest honor in baseball by being inducted into the Hall of Fame.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 


The "Tent of Tomorrow" was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Fifty years ago today, the world flocked to Queens, New York, for a glimpse of utopia.

Adults paid $2 for admission to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, and what they got in return was the next best thing to an actual trip to the moon. Scattered throughout a 646-acre urban oasis were 150 fancifully designed pavilions showcasing inventions that promised to boundlessly transform life and how it was lived. There were lasers, mainframe computers, ten-story tall rockets, touch tone telephones, microwave meals, color televisions -- even a dishwasher that melted washed and dried plastic dinnerware into new cups, plates, and saucers.

The future was here, and everyone was a Jetson.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.