National Treasures

City Unites to Save Berkeley’s Downtown Post Office

Posted on: April 10th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 2 Comments

 


The main office of the U.S. Postal Service in Berkeley, Calif., is an Italianate building constructed in the early 1900s.

Sometimes, you don’t know what you have until it’s almost gone.

That’s what Berkeley, Calif., resident Mike Lonergan realized back in June 2012 when the United States Postal Service announced the closure of the city’s main post office downtown, and sale of the landmark building appeared imminent.

“I had been in that building many, many times, but I never paid much attention to it,” Lonergan says. “You take so much for granted until you almost lose it.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Citizens Fight for the Northfield Post Office in Minnesota

Posted on: April 3rd, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 


Set just off of Bridge Square, the 1936 post office overlooks the Cannon River.

Whether it’s their historic downtown (listed on the National Register since 1983), the original Malt-O-Meal mill, which still produces the classic hot breakfast cereal, or the annual celebration of the town’s 1876 defeat of Jesse James and his gang during an attempted bank robbery, the city of Northfield, Minn., has always valued its history. Now, the town of roughly 20,000 residents, 40 miles south of Minneapolis, is fighting to save another prized possession: its 1936 post office.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Five Reasons We Support the Antiquities Act

Posted on: March 29th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy, Government Relations and Policy

View from the Effigy Mounds National Monument, north of Marquette, Iowa, along the Mississippi River. Credit: greenheron47, flickr
View from the Effigy Mounds National Monument, north of Marquette, Iowa, along the Mississippi River

This past week, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on H.R. 1459, the “Ensuring Public Involvement in the Creation of National Monument Act.” The bill’s title is misleading: What the legislation actually proposes is to curtail the President’s ability to act swiftly to establish or expand the designation of national monuments on federally owned or controlled property in order to protect sites, objects, and landscapes of historic, cultural, or scientific interest.

President Obama has used this law 10 times to great effect since 2011 to protect a wide array of places that have played a vital role in our country’s history -- places such as Fort Monroe in Virginia, Chimney Rock in Colorado, César E. Chávez in California, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad in Maryland, and El Rio Grande Del Norte in New Mexico.

Unfortunately, the House voted 222-201 to pass this problematic piece of legislation, mostly along party lines with 10 Republicans crossing over to oppose the bill and three Democrats voting to support the bill. Now that the House has passed it, the bill moves over to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee; if favorably reported out of this committee, it will land before the full Senate for consideration.

Be assured that we at the National Trust and our allies will continue to educate the members of the Senate on the flaws of H.R. 1459 in order to defeat this bill and preserve the Act’s power. Let’s start with the top five reasons we support the Antiquities Act.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Putting a Stamp on History at the Bronx General Post Office

Posted on: March 26th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

140325_blog_photo_PostOffice_3_NewYorkLandmarksConservancy
The United States Postal Service first proposed shuttering the post office, along with 16 other Bronx post offices, in 2012.

Thirteen colorful New Deal-era murals line the walls inside the Bronx General Post Office on the borough’s Grand Concourse. They stretch all the way to the 20-foot ceiling, towering over everyone who walks through the doors. Rendered in egg tempura on plaster by artist Ben Shahn and his wife Bernarda Bryson Shahn, the paintings embody the might of American labor and industry.

But until recently, the murals’ future, as well as that of the grand historic lobby that they occupy, was in doubt.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

#SaveTheDome Selfies: Showing Love for a National Treasure

Posted on: March 19th, 2014 by Grant Stevens

 


#astrodome #houston #8thWonderOfTheWorld -- @robbmaddox, Robb Maddox

Houston in March means one thing: the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. You name it, and it’s probably happening during the Rodeo's 20-day run. In 2013, over 2.5 million people came to the Rodeo, and each year the concert list is a who’s who of pop and country music performers.

The Rodeo takes place in Reliant Park, home of the Astrodome, and National Trust staff recently noticed something a little out of the ordinary: People are taking selfies with the Astrodome! Below, we’ve compiled some of our favorites for you to enjoy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.