National Treasures

 

Written by Mark Levitch, Art Historian and Founder, World War I Memorial Inventory Project

Rosedale, KS.  Rosedale World War I Memorial Arch. 1924. John LeRoy Marshall, architect. Credit: Mark Levitch
Architect John LeRoy Marshall designed the Rosedale World War I Memorial Arch (1924) in Rosedale, Kansas.

World War I, which started one hundred years ago this month, is generally considered one of America’s forgotten wars. But the war’s ubiquitous memorials -- perhaps more than for any other U.S. conflict -- beg to differ.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] How to Nominate a National Treasure

Posted on: July 22nd, 2014 by Cassie Keener

 

Today more than ever, historic places that tell America’s broad and diverse story are becoming endangered and threatened. These places contribute to our shared national heritage and that’s something worth protecting, which is why we at the National Trust for Historic Preservation created the National Treasures Program.

National Treasures are where we take direct, on-the-ground action to save these places and promote their history and significance. But we need your help in identifying places of national significance that would benefit from the deep organizational resources of the National Trust. This toolkit explains how you can nominate a threatened historic resource in your area to become a National Treasure.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She enjoys writing, spending time outdoors, and is a movie and music enthusiast.

 

Three teenagers stand on the Tent of Tomorrow’s mezzanine platform, also made of steel. Credit: Bill Cotter
Three teenagers stand on the Tent of Tomorrow’s steel mezzanine platform.

World’s Fair sites were rarely built to last. Just a handful of relics of these international expositions remain in the United States -- among them, the New York State Pavilion in Queens, New York.

Built for the 1964-54 World’s Fair, the Space Age structure dazzled visitors with visions of an exciting future. And yet 50 years later, despite decades of neglect and deterioration, the futuristic pavilion still stands in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. How did it do it?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

The Underground Legacy of Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 9 Comments

 

Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013. Credit: Ron Cogswell
Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013

Just east of downtown Richmond, Va., on the banks of the James River, you’ll find a historic neighborhood of national importance: Shockoe Bottom. From the 1830s through the Civil War, the area was the site of one of the largest slave trades in the United States, second only to New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

Credit: Carlos Betancourt Inc.
Gloria Estefan presented a gift of $500,000 to the Friends of Miami Marine Stadium through her foundation on Saturday, June 28.

We're big fans of Gloria Estefan, the international superstar and trustee of the National Trust. In June 2013, we profiled her in the Spring issue of Preservation magazine, and she agreed to be the official “Voice of Miami Marine Stadium." Then, in January 2014, she and Jimmy Buffet were part of a one-of-a-kind celebration at the Coral Gables Museum.

This past Saturday, we found yet another reason to admire her: She announced a $500,000 gift through her foundation to our local partner, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium (FMMS).

Gloria’s announcement was part of the National Trust's “Day of Art and Action” at Miami Marine Stadium. In addition to announcing Gloria’s gift, the ART History Mural Project brought nine internationally recognized artists to the stadium to create large-scale murals. Curated by artist Logan Hicks, the murals will be photographed and sold as prints to benefit FMMS.

In addition, we held an Instagram contest where winners attended the day’s festivities, met Gloria and Hilario Candela (the stadium’s architect), and watched the street artists create their pieces. To help you get a feel for the day-long event and learn more about the artists, we pulled some photos from Instagram -- you can see more by searching the hashtag #marinestadium or checking out the @SavingPlaces account. Enjoy!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.