National Treasures

 


The "Tent of Tomorrow" was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Fifty years ago today, the world flocked to Queens, New York, for a glimpse of utopia.

Adults paid $2 for admission to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, and what they got in return was the next best thing to an actual trip to the moon. Scattered throughout a 646-acre urban oasis were 150 fancifully designed pavilions showcasing inventions that promised to boundlessly transform life and how it was lived. There were lasers, mainframe computers, ten-story tall rockets, touch tone telephones, microwave meals, color televisions -- even a dishwasher that melted washed and dried plastic dinnerware into new cups, plates, and saucers.

The future was here, and everyone was a Jetson.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 

By William Tyre, Executive Director and Curator, Glessner House Museum


Glessner House Museum, restored 2011.

In 2013, Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago was designated a National Historic Landmark (NHL) -- the only individually listed church in the city to be so honored. On a personal level it represented something very special to me because it meant that I now lived, worked, and worshiped in National Historic Landmarks -- something I consider to be a rare and possibly unique privilege.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

La Jolla Community Continues Fight for Historic Post Office

Posted on: April 18th, 2014 by Steven Piccione

 


La Jolla, Calif., a coastal village outside of San Diego, is home to a historic post office, built in 1935.

San Diego is well known for its annual superhero-packed convention Comic-Con, incredible weather, and burritos stuffed with French fries. But while Marvel heroes are busy defeating Lex Luthor and the Joker, just northwest of the city in the coastal village of La Jolla, Calif., the local community is fighting the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) over whether or not their beloved post office will be sold and relocated.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

 


Hinchliffe Stadium’s Art Deco cast concrete construction has long suffered from neglect.

The 1933 Art Deco Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., is one of the few remaining stadiums in the country associated with Negro League Baseball, and the former home to some of the league’s greatest players and teams.

In connection with today’s community cleanup of Hinchliffe, coordinated by the National Trust, the city of Paterson, and the Hinchliffe Steering Committee, PreservationNation spoke with famed Negro League historian Dr. Larry Hogan about the significance of Hinchliffe Stadium and the legacy of Negro League Baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Baseball’s Hidden History

Posted on: April 15th, 2014 by Guest Writer 5 Comments

 

Written by Adrian Burgos, Jr., Professor, U.S. History, University of Illinois

Graffiti at Hinchliffe Stadium. Credit: DanielLugo, Flickr
Built in 1932, Hinchliffe Stadium is situated near Great Falls, a National Historic Landmark in Paterson, N.J.

Years before Jackie Robinson stepped across the white lines and onto Ebbets Field to make history as major league baseball's integration pioneer, decades before Roberto Clemente displayed his hitting prowess, graceful fielding, and powerful arm on North American baseball diamonds, and well before U.S. baseball fans became acquainted with the high-leg kick of Juan Marichal, the pitching gyrations of Luis Tiant, the prodigious home runs of Orlando Cepeda, other amazing performances of Big Papi David Ortiz, Pedro Martinez, and Manny Ramirez, black baseball fans congregated on Saturdays to watch the Negro League’s premier talent at Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J. -- a historic space where African-American and Latino fans watched some of their own perform during the era of segregated baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.