Local Preservationists

 

By Christine Madrid French, Project Director, Preservation Capen, Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Project Director Christine Madrid French, with "Ginger" floating on the lake. Credit: Christine Madrid French
Project Director Christine Madrid French, with "Ginger" floating on the lake.

Veteran historic preservationists often grasp for creative opportunities to save an endangered building. In Winter Park, Florida, advocates for an 1885 house combined innovative nonprofit collaborations, engineering feats, and grassroots community outreach to mount an extraordinary preservation operation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Colorado’s 1911 Silverton School Hits Preservation High

Posted on: February 3rd, 2014 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Silverton’s 1911 school serves grades K-12 and sits at 9,305 feet above sea level. Credit: Scott Smith
Silverton’s 1911 school serves grades K-12 and sits at 9,305 feet above sea level.

Everything is a little tougher in Silverton, Colo. Take, for example, breathing. At more than 9,300 feet, the town of some-600 sits in pretty thin air.

Then there’s the issue of getting there. Accessible only by high-mountain pass or the historic Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, making the trek is nothing to sneeze at.

Needless to say, residents of this former mining town and National Register Historic District in southwestern Colorado are a hearty bunch, so when it came time to preserve their historic 1911 schoolhouse, there were no ifs, ands, or buts about it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Jason Deem. Credit: Cole Geddy Photography
Jason Deem

As part of the Cities in Focus Blog series, the Community Outreach team wanted to highlight a local leader -- someone who is in the city, living the preservation-minded, place-loving life. For our first city of St. Louis, we chose Jason Deem, the owner of South Side Spaces and Nebula Coworking, as well as president of the Cherokee Station Business Association. We hope you enjoy our chat with him!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

 

By Kathleen M. Yasas, President, Save The Sherburne Inn Restoration Project, Inc.

A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today. Credit: Rick L. Crowell Photography
A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today.

There was no Jimmy Stewart. No basket full of cash spilled onto a table to get George Bailey out of trouble. No little girl telling her daddy that every time a bell sounds an angel gets his wings. But there is no question that angels were close by on December 6, 2013, when The Sherburne Inn opened its doors for the first time in more than decade to welcome over a hundred people to gather and celebrate the rebirth of a century-old landmark.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

The library and accompanying saucer were built in 1964 and dedicated to the memory of President John F. Kennedy, Jr. Credit: Michael Gannon, Prince George’s County Memorial Library System
The library and accompanying saucer were built in 1964 and dedicated to the memory of President John F. Kennedy, Jr.

The flying saucer hovering above the doorway of the public library in Hyattsville, Md., is meant to look futuristic, a poured-concrete ode to the Space Race and America’s midcentury fascination with all things extraterrestrial.

Inside, though, the 1964 building is notably dated. “There’s no technology infrastructure,” explains Michael Gannon, associate director for support services at the Prince George’s County Memorial Library System. “There are very few electrical outlets, and it’s also barely ADA compliant.” He adds that the windows in the building had to be bolted shut after they frequently slid open by themselves.

Although plans to replace the low-slung, brick modernist building with a brand-new structure are underway, a small but vocal Hyattsville group has spoken out in favor of preserving the approximately 20-foot tall glass and concrete saucer, as well as the library as a whole. The “Save Our Saucer” campaign has garnered more than 500 Facebook “likes,” and while the tone on the page is humorous and lighthearted, giving “Saucer” a personality (a post from last August features the cover of “The Flying Saucer Mystery,” a Nancy Drew novel, while the caption reads “What Saucer read over the weekend”), it’s clear that the space-age relic holds a cherished place in the hearts of longtime Hyattsville residents.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.