Local Preservationists

Saving Colonel Charles Young's Historic Birthplace in Mays Lick, Ky.

Posted on: November 22nd, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

Colonel Charles Young was born in this cabin in May’s Lick, Ky., in 1864. Credit: Bill Macintire, Kentucky Heritage Council

The cabin doesn’t look like much. Tucked into a stand of trees and covered in vines, its log walls and stone chimney slightly off-kilter, the neglected building has sat empty for years. But its humble appearance belies a big slice of history: In 1864 it served as the birthplace of Charles Young, an African-American colonel who fought discrimination to build a remarkable military career.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Giving Thanks for Preservation's Most Essential Part: Its People

Posted on: November 21st, 2013 by Priya Chhaya

 

Thirty Instagram aficionados went behind the scenes at Miami Marine Stadium in October 2013. Credit: RAYMEDphotography
Thirty Instagram aficionados went behind the scenes at National Treasure Miami Marine Stadium in October 2013.

Fall is when the leaves change color, the temperature lowers, and we look to places that bring us warmth and comfort. It is the season when we return home, the space where the first spark of the past comes together in a real and personal way. Autumn is a visible reminder of the passage of time, and when we Americans articulate our thanks for what the year has brought.

This fall, I am thankful for the people of preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

Lost: Univision Building Demolished in San Antonio

Posted on: November 20th, 2013 by Lauren Walser 2 Comments

 

Demolition of the Univision building continued last week to make way for a $55 million, 350-unit housing development. Credit: Sylvia Gonzalez
Demolition of the Univision building continued last week to make way for a $55 million, 350-unit housing development.

Residents of San Antonio watched last week as the 1955 Univision building fell to the wrecking ball, despite a long, hard battle fought by the city’s preservationists and activists to save it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Deconstruction and Discovery: A West Virginia Community Digs into the McCoy Fort's Colonial Past

Posted on: November 15th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Kate Schminky, Public Affairs Intern

The current state of Fort McCoy. A significant chimney foundation is visible on the west side and a lesser defined chimney foundation can be seen on the opposite end. The structure, at 28' x 26', was two stories of nine logs each. Credit: Carolyn Stephens
The current state of the McCoy Fort. A significant chimney foundation is visible on the west side (bottom), while a lesser defined chimney foundation can be seen on the opposite end. The structure, at 28' x 26', was two stories of nine logs each.

Historians were in for a pleasant surprise in 2003 when a local history teacher directed archeologists Kim and Stephen McBride to a barn in West Virginia’s Greenbrier County. McCoy family tradition always suggested that the family’s original homestead was located in the county’s Sinking Valley, but an official discovery had yet to be made -- and no one thought it would involve so many sheep.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

The Denmark Presbyterian Church: A Corner of Tennessee History

Posted on: November 7th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 6 Comments

 

The exterior of the church after restoration was completed. Credit: Big Black Creek Historical Association
The exterior of the Denmark Presbyterian Church after restoration was completed.

With a current population of seven (yes, just seven), you’d think there wouldn’t be much to the town of Denmark in west Tennessee. But the little crossroads just 70-odd miles northeast of Memphis is a place with some oversized history.

Denmark is said to be the oldest Anglo town in West Tennessee, dating roughly to the 1818 treaty that Andrew Jackson signed for the land with the Chickasaw tribe. And contrary to the belief of the 40 or so Danish nationals that visit the town each year, the name is believed to come from the Chickasaw term for their hunting ground.

Most of the area was settled on land grants during the 1820s at three cents an acre. An estimated 50 to 60 percent of those grants remain in the families of their original owners. The town was the largest in the region until the railroads boosted neighbors like the city of Jackson.

And today, the little town’s crown jewel is the Denmark Presbyterian Church.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.