Local Preservationists

 

Lt. Col. (Ret.) Porter Johnson purchased and began restoring the 1850 plantation house in his hometown of Tallulah, Louisiana after returning from Iraq in the summer of 2011.
Lt. Col. (Ret.) Porter Johnson purchased and began restoring the 1850 plantation house in his hometown of Tallulah, Louisiana, after returning from Iraq in the summer of 2011.

In the winter issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight the story of Lt. Col. (Ret.) Porter Johnson, who was bitten by the preservation bug while serving in Baghdad from 2010-2011. After returning home, Johnson set to work restoring an 1850 plantation house in his hometown of Tallulah, Louisiana.

Johnson was one of the best and most enthusiastic interviews I had all year, and I wish I could have made more of his story fit on the page. Luckily for me -- and for you -- I get the chance to publish more of his unique story below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

The Randolph School in 1928
The Randolph School in 1928

After Hurricane Katrina hit the small town of Pass Christian in Mississippi, many in the community were displaced, homes were lost, and schools and churches were destroyed. However, this small community came together to fight for and save a small schoolhouse -- the Randolph School, one of the few remaining Rosenwald Schools in Mississippi.

“Here was a town facing every problem known to man… they didn’t have lights, sewers, water, streets, anything,” says Lolly Barnes, Executive Director of the Mississippi Heritage Trust. “And yet they said this building was worthy of saving.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O’Connor is the member services assistant at the National Trust. She enjoys learning, writing, and talking about museums, art, architecture, and anything historic.

Industrial Strength: The Adaptive Reuse of Ames Shovel Works

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding 2 Comments

 

The historic Steam Hammer Shop, which was damaged by fire in the early 1900s.
The historic Steam Hammer Shop, which was damaged by fire in the early 1900s.

There’s nothing like the proposed demolition of a beloved property to motivate a community. For the town of Easton, Massachusetts, that property was the Ames Shovel Works, a granite-walled relic of New England’s Industrial Age. The site forms the heart of a National Register-listed historic district, and when it was threatened a few years ago, Easton’s residents weren’t going to let it go without a fight.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

5 Unique Examples of Preserving Native American Historic Sites

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Guest Writer

 

By Kristi Eaton

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Michael Brown, archaeologist for the Colorado Wickiup Project, records a wickiup in west central Colorado that dates to around A.D. 1795.

As the original inhabitants, Native Americans play a unique and significant part to the United States’ historic preservation efforts. In fact, Native American tribes have their own officers dedicated to preserving and restoring tribal history. (Learn more about tribal historic preservation officers, or THPOs, here.)

But for many of the more than 500 federally recognized tribes in the United States, that history is one of both pain and resiliency. Tribal members have said that some of the most painful experiences and memories include losing their land, being forced to relocate, and being forced to attend boarding schools. Restoring and preserving sites related to these periods can help educate today’s Native Americans as well as non-Native Americans about tribal history.

Below are some of the unique ways Native American communities are working in conjunction with state and federal agencies and private organizations to preserve tribal history and culture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Mad River Glen’s Single-Chair Lift: Restoring an Icon

Posted on: December 30th, 2014 by Lauren Walser

 

Left: Crews remove the aging towers from their concrete bases. Right: The single-chair lift takes one skier per chair on a 12-minute ride to the top of General Stark Mountain.
Left: Crews remove the aging towers from their concrete bases. Right: The single-chair lift takes one skier per chair on a 12-minute ride to the top of General Stark Mountain.

Mad River Glen ski area in Vermont’s Green Mountain Range isn’t like most ski areas. As you’ll read in the Winter 2015 issue of Preservation, it tends to buck the trends: It rarely uses manmade snow, it does minimal grooming of its trails, it forbids snowboarding, and it’s owned by its skiers, who formed the Mad River Glen Cooperative in 1995.

In fact, Mad River Glen today looks much the way it did when it celebrated its grand opening 66 years ago.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Preserving Latino History at Pike Park in Dallas

Posted on: December 22nd, 2014 by Geoff Montes 5 Comments

 

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This historical photo shows Pike Park's Spanish Colonial recreation center soon after its 1914 construction. The building -- which is now closed to the public -- has undergone a series of modifications, including the removal of the upper floor. 

In Dallas, the ethnic enclave once known as Little Mexico has undergone a rapid shift in the 21st century. The nearby American Airlines Center -- home of the Dallas Mavericks -- opened in 2001, ushering in an era of change; real estate developers gobbled up what was left of the single-family housing stock and began erecting market-rate condominiums and office towers. Real estate agents have sleekly rebranded the neighborhood as “Uptown,” a rare walkable area the auto-centric city. But the hundred-year-old Pike Park -- a four-acre green space tucked away in the neighborhood’s southwest corner -- remains as a relic of an era long gone.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.