Local Preservationists

 

You might not know it, but preservation has a party side -- and it's on full display at legacy bars across the country. In our new Historic Bars series, we'll belly up to the places that only locals usually know about and introduce their favorite haunts to all our readers.

Look for a different theme each month, and don't forget to tell us about your preferred watering hole. Now, without further adieu, let's kick off our first theme: neighborhood and dive bars!

Credit: SF A Gogo, Flickr
Bartender Ed is known for his personable and easygoing attitude, not to mention his strong drinks and the occasional free shot of Jaeger.

It’s hard not to notice the Gangway. Just walk down Larkin Street in San Francisco’s Tenderloin neighborhood, and look for the big white ship projecting from a storefront.

Behind that ship is one of the city’s oldest gay bars with a rich history of activism -- and, as regulars attest, a laid-back, home-away-from-home atmosphere with stiff drinks, to boot.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

Credit: MarkSweep, Wikimedia Commons
Frederick Douglass, who was born a slave, is one of the most influential abolitionists in American history. His home in Anacostia, D.C., Cedar Hill, has undergone a series of renovations.

In 1917, readers of The Crisis magazine, the official publication of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), would have come across a powerful call to action, written by one Mrs. Mary B. Talbert.

Talbert, an educator, civil rights activist, and then-president of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC) had turned her eyes to Cedar Hill, the Washington, D.C., home of abolitionist Frederick Douglass.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House: Music to a Preservationist’s Ears

Posted on: May 19th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Jackson Rooming House, exterior. Credit: Bracken Engineering
Outside the Jackson Rooming House

Though there’s no clear record for when exactly it was built, Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House started off as a typical single-family home in the 1890s. It wasn’t until between 1901 and 1905 that it received its addition and became the one of the city’s few rooming houses that catered to African-Americans during the era of segregation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Young Preservationist Focuses His Lens on Miami Marine Stadium

Posted on: May 14th, 2014 by Steven Piccione

 

Credit: Ivan Robles
Ivan Robles, right, a Miami native, hopes to be a liaison between the older generation that has grown up with the Miami Marine Stadium and the current generation.

Younger generations are vitally important for the continuation of historic preservation. That is why we at the National Trust responded enthusiastically to a request from Ivan Robles, a sophomore at Miami Beach Senior High School, to share his photographs of the Miami Marine Stadium, one of our National Treasures. We chatted with Ivan to learn how this unique space inspires him.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

Northampton Native Breathes New Life into Horner Cemetery

Posted on: May 5th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 5 Comments

 

Credit: Kelly Schindler/National Trust for Historic Preservation
To this day, descendants of the Horner family return to the cemetery to view the tombstones of their ancestors.

An hour drive’s north of Philadelphia lies Northampton, Pa., a town in an area rich with coal mines and even richer in American history. Its story starts well before the American Revolution, as a frontier settlement of Scottish and Irish immigrants who fled from religious persecution and famine, only to clash with the native Lenape tribe.

While the newly settled community struggled to establish itself in the New World, a woman by the name of Jane Horner was struck in the head by a tomahawk (as the story goes), becoming the first woman killed during the French and Indian War, as well as the namesake for Horner Cemetery.

Nearly invisible from Route 329, Horner Cemetery spreads across a quarter acre of land situated behind a local Presbyterian church. Unkempt, overgrown, and neglected for decades, it was easy to miss. That is, until 2009, when Peggy Moser -- Northampton County born and raised -- took it upon herself to breathe new life into the oldest cemetery in this part of Pennsylvania.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.