Local Preservationists

Submit Your Local Project for a National Preservation Award

Posted on: March 5th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Brendan McCormick, Grants & Awards Assistant

Every year the National Trust celebrates the best in preservation by presenting the Richard H. Driehaus National Preservation Awards. In 2012, projects of all shapes and sizes were recognized, ranging from a small historic house museum on Hilton Head Island, SC, to the adaptive use of the 926,000-square-foot 30th Street Main Post Office in Philadelphia, to the almost extra-terrestrial-looking ASM International Headquarters in Materials Park, Ohio.

The National Preservation Awards celebrate not just the physical sites that were saved, but the people whose hard work went into saving that place. They are an opportunity to recognize communities that rally together and refuse to lose one of their local landmarks. Let's revisit some of the award-winners we've profiled recently who illustrate the power of people saving places.

Gullah Museum team. Credit: Butch Hirsch
Gullah Museum team

The Little House’s transformation into the Gullah Museum is proof that no project is too small to be recognized. After a two-year capital campaign and a community-wide restoration effort that included hundreds of volunteer hours, Gullah Museum of Hilton Head Island is a shining example of how a community can join together around preservation and save an important historic resource.

Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building. Credit: Rick Kready/The Pioneer Group
Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building

In Leavenworth, Kansas, another group of local preservationists rallied together to help save Eisenhower Ridge Building 19. The group, Veterans Administration Leavenworth Opportunity for Reuse, or VALOR, worked with the Veterans Administration and other local companies to save the building from demolition. Their efforts resulted in a state-of-the-art office building that brought 400 jobs back to Leavenworth.

Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration. Credit: Susanna Campbell Kuo
Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration

In 2003, concerned citizens of Lake Oswego, Oregon, noticed that their historic 1866 blast furnace, the Oswego Iron Furnace, was missing from the renovation plans for their community park. The community banded together and provided over 600 hours of volunteer work and research. Their findings helped convince the local government to fund the restoration of this community landmark.

Do you have a project that deserves recognition? We’d love to hear from you. The nomination deadline is this Friday, March 8.

For the application you will need:

  • A 6,000-character project description that describes the project from start to finish
  • A 4,000-character description of how this project is unique, why it deserves an award, and how it fits the award criteria
  • Up to five (5) supporting documents including brochures or news clippings
  • Up to three (3) letters of recommendation
  • A list of any other awards this project has received in the past
  • Fifteen (15) photos of the project, and a word document with photo captions and photo credits

Before applying, please read the full eligibility requirements and awards descriptions here. A link to the nomination form can be found at the bottom of the page. If you have any questions, please email awards@savingplaces.org.

Good luck!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Second in our series on Egyptian movie theaters around the country.

The exterior of Boise’s Egyptian Theatre, which has been restored and maintained to look the same as when it was built in 1927. Credit: Sheri Freemuth
The exterior of Boise’s Egyptian Theatre, which has been restored and maintained to look similar to when it was built in 1927.

After Earl Hardy signed the contract to purchase the Egyptian Theatre in Boise, Idaho in 1977, his daughter Kay reports that the first thing he did was return to the office the two shared and say, “I must be crazy.”

The movie theater, built in 1927 in the Egyptian Revival architectural style popularized by the 1922 discovery of King Tut’s tomb, had long been a mainstay of downtown Boise. In 1974 the theater, which was owned by the Oppenheimer-Falk Realty Company at the time, was sold to the Boise Redevelopment Agency. The agency, backed by money from federally-funded urban renewal programs, was pushing to develop an eight-block space in the heart of downtown into an inward-facing shopping mall.

“Four blocks of downtown Boise had been completely leveled,” recalls Kay Hardy, who was working with her father at the time. “We had an urban renewal agency, and a mayor who wanted this downtown mall built. The cost was leveling the town I grew up in.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

A Modern Take On Serving Veterans At Leavenworth Building 19

Posted on: February 28th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

The exterior of the new medical records facility at night. Credit: Rick Kready/The Pioneer Group
The exterior of the renovated building, now a VA medical records facility.

Leavenworth Building 19 in Leavenworth, Kansas doesn’t look much different on the outside from when it was built in 1886, but that’s the idea. It has the same Romanesque Revival architecture, the same charming red brick exterior, and the same row of dormer windows lining the slanted roof.

On the inside, though, Building 19 is every inch a state-of-the-art office building, chock full of modern amenities and bright white lights. It’s come a long way since its days as the dining hall of the Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, a campus built in the 1880s to house Civil War veterans. In 2012, the repurposed building was recognized with a Preservation Honor Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

A Love Letter to the Wilson County Courthouse

Posted on: February 28th, 2013 by Jason Clement

 

The Huffington Post is currently hosting The Love Letters Project, an anthology of reflections on American places by the local people that define them. Our very own Jason Lloyd Clement made the cut with this letter of love and admiration for the Wilson County Courthouse in Floresville, Texas. Reposted here for your enjoyment!

Jason Clement takes pictures at Wilson County Courthouse during the I Love Texas Courthouse campaign. Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation
Jason Clement takes pictures at Wilson County Courthouse during the I Love Texas Courthouses campaign.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 

The Soo Line ore dock in 2009. Credit: chief_huddleston, flickr
The Soo Line ore dock in 2009

As a young boy, John Chapple would clamber out onto the old ore dock stretching 1,800 feet from the shores of his hometown of Ashland, Wis., into Lake Superior, where he would join his siblings and cousins for an afternoon of fishing, swimming, and jumping off the dock’s lower levels.

“And sometimes, when we got reckless, the higher levels,” Chapple says with a laugh.

Chapple, like many Ashland residents, holds a vast collection of memories of this massive, 80-foot-tall structure, a local landmark since it was built in 1916. But today, as it is slowly being demolished by its current owners, Canadian National Railway, Chapple worries the ore dock will remain just that -- a memory.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.