Local Preservationists

Peery's Egyptian Theater: A Utah Theater Goes From Shutdown to Sundance

Posted on: March 11th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 6 Comments

 

Third in our series on Egyptian movie theaters around the country.

Opening of the movie "Duel In the Sun," 1946, at Peery's Egyptian Theater. Credit: Van Summerill Collection
Opening of the movie "Duel In the Sun," 1946, at Peery's Egyptian Theater.

From small towns on the plains, to inner-city neighborhoods on the coasts, theaters used to be at the center of nearly every American community, right along with the local hardware store and maybe a deli or family-owned grocery. But as indoor shopping malls and multiplexes grew in popularity from the 1970s on, traditional central business districts lost their luster and their patrons.

The script is the same nearly everywhere, and for a while, it looked like Peery’s Egyptian Theater in Ogden, Utah was going to play its part.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Women in Preservation: Nancy Schamu Reflects on Four Decades of Saving Places

Posted on: March 7th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

This profile, written by Byrd Wood, originally appeared on Preservation Leadership Forum blog. It has been edited for length and clarity.

Nancy Schamu. Credit: Nancy Schamu
Nancy Schamu

Preservationists often jokingly refer to some of the early pioneers in the preservation movement as "little old ladies in tennis shoes standing in front of bulldozers." But the movement changed dramatically in 1966 following the enactment of the National Historic Preservation Act, when a wave of young history graduates, eager to assume positions in the recently created state historic preservation offices, soon began to replace the feisty, determined volunteers of the early part of the century.

Nancy Schamu, who is retiring this month after 26 years with the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers (NCSHPO), was one of them, and she strode confidently into the new preservation profession with all the energy and idealism of her 1960s generation. From the early days of rousing Section 106 battles over elevated highways to today’s advocacy efforts to protect the tax credits, Schamu has been more than willing to "raise her hand," as she puts it, to speak out clearly -- and often quite forcefully -- in favor of preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Submit Your Local Project for a National Preservation Award

Posted on: March 5th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Brendan McCormick, Grants & Awards Assistant

Every year the National Trust celebrates the best in preservation by presenting the Richard H. Driehaus National Preservation Awards. In 2012, projects of all shapes and sizes were recognized, ranging from a small historic house museum on Hilton Head Island, SC, to the adaptive use of the 926,000-square-foot 30th Street Main Post Office in Philadelphia, to the almost extra-terrestrial-looking ASM International Headquarters in Materials Park, Ohio.

The National Preservation Awards celebrate not just the physical sites that were saved, but the people whose hard work went into saving that place. They are an opportunity to recognize communities that rally together and refuse to lose one of their local landmarks. Let's revisit some of the award-winners we've profiled recently who illustrate the power of people saving places.

Gullah Museum team. Credit: Butch Hirsch
Gullah Museum team

The Little House’s transformation into the Gullah Museum is proof that no project is too small to be recognized. After a two-year capital campaign and a community-wide restoration effort that included hundreds of volunteer hours, Gullah Museum of Hilton Head Island is a shining example of how a community can join together around preservation and save an important historic resource.

Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building. Credit: Rick Kready/The Pioneer Group
Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building

In Leavenworth, Kansas, another group of local preservationists rallied together to help save Eisenhower Ridge Building 19. The group, Veterans Administration Leavenworth Opportunity for Reuse, or VALOR, worked with the Veterans Administration and other local companies to save the building from demolition. Their efforts resulted in a state-of-the-art office building that brought 400 jobs back to Leavenworth.

Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration. Credit: Susanna Campbell Kuo
Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration

In 2003, concerned citizens of Lake Oswego, Oregon, noticed that their historic 1866 blast furnace, the Oswego Iron Furnace, was missing from the renovation plans for their community park. The community banded together and provided over 600 hours of volunteer work and research. Their findings helped convince the local government to fund the restoration of this community landmark.

Do you have a project that deserves recognition? We’d love to hear from you. The nomination deadline is this Friday, March 8.

For the application you will need:

  • A 6,000-character project description that describes the project from start to finish
  • A 4,000-character description of how this project is unique, why it deserves an award, and how it fits the award criteria
  • Up to five (5) supporting documents including brochures or news clippings
  • Up to three (3) letters of recommendation
  • A list of any other awards this project has received in the past
  • Fifteen (15) photos of the project, and a word document with photo captions and photo credits

Before applying, please read the full eligibility requirements and awards descriptions here. A link to the nomination form can be found at the bottom of the page. If you have any questions, please email awards@savingplaces.org.

Good luck!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Second in our series on Egyptian movie theaters around the country.

The exterior of Boise’s Egyptian Theatre, which has been restored and maintained to look the same as when it was built in 1927. Credit: Sheri Freemuth
The exterior of Boise’s Egyptian Theatre, which has been restored and maintained to look similar to when it was built in 1927.

After Earl Hardy signed the contract to purchase the Egyptian Theatre in Boise, Idaho in 1977, his daughter Kay reports that the first thing he did was return to the office the two shared and say, “I must be crazy.”

The movie theater, built in 1927 in the Egyptian Revival architectural style popularized by the 1922 discovery of King Tut’s tomb, had long been a mainstay of downtown Boise. In 1974 the theater, which was owned by the Oppenheimer-Falk Realty Company at the time, was sold to the Boise Redevelopment Agency. The agency, backed by money from federally-funded urban renewal programs, was pushing to develop an eight-block space in the heart of downtown into an inward-facing shopping mall.

“Four blocks of downtown Boise had been completely leveled,” recalls Kay Hardy, who was working with her father at the time. “We had an urban renewal agency, and a mayor who wanted this downtown mall built. The cost was leveling the town I grew up in.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

A Modern Take On Serving Veterans At Leavenworth Building 19

Posted on: February 28th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

The exterior of the new medical records facility at night. Credit: Rick Kready/The Pioneer Group
The exterior of the renovated building, now a VA medical records facility.

Leavenworth Building 19 in Leavenworth, Kansas doesn’t look much different on the outside from when it was built in 1886, but that’s the idea. It has the same Romanesque Revival architecture, the same charming red brick exterior, and the same row of dormer windows lining the slanted roof.

On the inside, though, Building 19 is every inch a state-of-the-art office building, chock full of modern amenities and bright white lights. It’s come a long way since its days as the dining hall of the Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, a campus built in the 1880s to house Civil War veterans. In 2012, the repurposed building was recognized with a Preservation Honor Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.