Local Preservationists

 

Credit: MarkSweep, Wikimedia Commons
Frederick Douglass, who was born a slave, is one of the most influential abolitionists in American history. His home in Anacostia, D.C., Cedar Hill, has undergone a series of renovations.

In 1917, readers of The Crisis magazine, the official publication of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), would have come across a powerful call to action, written by one Mrs. Mary B. Talbert.

Talbert, an educator, civil rights activist, and then-president of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC) had turned her eyes to Cedar Hill, the Washington, D.C., home of abolitionist Frederick Douglass.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House: Music to a Preservationist’s Ears

Posted on: May 19th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Jackson Rooming House, exterior. Credit: Bracken Engineering
Outside the Jackson Rooming House

Though there’s no clear record for when exactly it was built, Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House started off as a typical single-family home in the 1890s. It wasn’t until between 1901 and 1905 that it received its addition and became the one of the city’s few rooming houses that catered to African-Americans during the era of segregation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Young Preservationist Focuses His Lens on Miami Marine Stadium

Posted on: May 14th, 2014 by Steven Piccione

 

Credit: Ivan Robles
Ivan Robles, right, a Miami native, hopes to be a liaison between the older generation that has grown up with the Miami Marine Stadium and the current generation.

Younger generations are vitally important for the continuation of historic preservation. That is why we at the National Trust responded enthusiastically to a request from Ivan Robles, a sophomore at Miami Beach Senior High School, to share his photographs of the Miami Marine Stadium, one of our National Treasures. We chatted with Ivan to learn how this unique space inspires him.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

Northampton Native Breathes New Life into Horner Cemetery

Posted on: May 5th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 5 Comments

 

Credit: Kelly Schindler/National Trust for Historic Preservation
To this day, descendants of the Horner family return to the cemetery to view the tombstones of their ancestors.

An hour drive’s north of Philadelphia lies Northampton, Pa., a town in an area rich with coal mines and even richer in American history. Its story starts well before the American Revolution, as a frontier settlement of Scottish and Irish immigrants who fled from religious persecution and famine, only to clash with the native Lenape tribe.

While the newly settled community struggled to establish itself in the New World, a woman by the name of Jane Horner was struck in the head by a tomahawk (as the story goes), becoming the first woman killed during the French and Indian War, as well as the namesake for Horner Cemetery.

Nearly invisible from Route 329, Horner Cemetery spreads across a quarter acre of land situated behind a local Presbyterian church. Unkempt, overgrown, and neglected for decades, it was easy to miss. That is, until 2009, when Peggy Moser -- Northampton County born and raised -- took it upon herself to breathe new life into the oldest cemetery in this part of Pennsylvania.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

Historic Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Larger Impact of African-American Legacy

Posted on: April 30th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Jessica Pumphrey, Associate Manager of Public Affairs

Credit: S. Heffern, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Hinchliffe Stadium sat vacant for some 20 years until hundreds of volunteers recently repainted the historic venue.

Last week, we opened the doors of Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., to more than 700 volunteers in an effort to breathe new life into the iconic sports arena. Known for its role in Negro League Baseball, Hinchliffe Stadium was the home field for teams like the New York Black Yankees and the Newark Eagles. Legendary players like Larry Doby, Josh Gibson, Monte Irvin, and more, all graced the field not knowing that one day they’d receive the highest honor in baseball by being inducted into the Hall of Fame.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.