Local Preservationists

Barbara Baer Capitman: South Beach’s Art Deco Hero

Posted on: September 3rd, 2014 by Guest Writer 4 Comments

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

Barbara Baer Capitman leads an ultimately unsuccessful protest to protect the Biscaya Hotel, which was demolished in 1987. Credit Barbara Baer Capitman Archives and the Miami Design Preservation League
Barbara Baer Capitman led an ultimately unsuccessful protest to protect the Biscaya Hotel, which was demolished in 1987.

She had a squeaky voice that people mocked. She was shy and soft-spoken. Her obituary in The Los Angeles Times stopped just short of patronizing, calling her an "intrepid little old lady.”

But if not for Barbara Baer Capitman, the magnificent collection of Art Deco buildings of Miami's South Beach -- the nation's first 20th century National Historic District -- would be just a memory, most likely replaced by high-rise hotels and condos.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

From Nature to Needlework: How Woodlawn Connects Kids to History

Posted on: September 2nd, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Katherine Malone-France, Vice President for Historic Sites

Farm Campers did Farm Chores every morning, which included everything from bug squishing and weeding, to watering and harvesting. Credit Morgan Maloney
Farm Campers did Farm Chores every morning, which included everything from bug squishing and weeding, to watering and harvesting.

Before summer slips away, I’d like to share a little bit of seasonal magic with you, courtesy of Woodlawn/Pope-Leighey, a National Trust Historic Site in Alexandria, Virginia.

At the end of July, I had the pleasure of attending a celebration marking the end of four weeks of Farm Camp at Arcadia Farm at Woodlawn. Arcadia Farm is located at Woodlawn, and is operated by the Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Military Veterans Tackle HOPE Crew Project at Custer National Cemetery

Posted on: August 25th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

The HOPE Crew’s Custer National Cemetery project was the first to incorporate an all-veteran hitch. Participants represented every branch of the military. Credit: Audrey Hall
The HOPE Crew’s Custer National Cemetery project was the first to incorporate an all-veteran hitch. Participants represented every branch of the military.

It’s one of the most famous battles in American history. In May, 1876, Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry tracked down roughly 8,000 Cheyenne and Sioux Indians in southeastern Montana and stepped into battle with about 1,800 of them. The rest, as they say, is history.

Now a small piece of that history is being restored, with help from the National Trust, The Corps Network, The Montana Conservation Corps, and the National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Training Center.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Estelle Axton: A Woman, A Place, and the Memphis Sound

Posted on: August 13th, 2014 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Siblings Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton defied cultural norms in the Jim Crow era to found Stax Records, one of the most influential soul and R&B labels of the 1960s and '70s. Credit: Stax Museum of American Soul Music
Siblings Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton defied cultural norms in the Jim Crow era to found Stax Records, one of the most influential soul and R&B labels of the 1960s and '70s.

There's no obvious reason why Estelle Axton and her brother Jim Stewart should have been the kind of people who would established Stax Records in the Jim Crow South.

One of the most prominent and influential soul and R&B labels of the 1960s, Stax artists included Otis Redding, Sam and Dave, Wilson Pickett, and Isaac Hayes, backed by the house band, Booker T. and the MGs. The studio was located in the blue-collar African-American neighborhood of South Memphis, was founded by a pair of white siblings, and was a tightknit family of black and white artists working together.

"Jim and Estelle were righteous people who were living during a time and in a place that suggested that they should be anything other than who they were," says Deanie Parker, who joined the Stax family as a teenager and went on to become director of publicity. Parker helped establish the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, which opened in 2003 on the site of the original studio.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Come High Water: Preservation and Resilience in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Posted on: August 11th, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Daniel Ronan, Site Projects & Public Engagement Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Members of Save Cedar Rapids Heritage gather to protest the demolition of the Hach Building before the owner razed the building, considered a contributing structure in the New Bohemia Historic District. Credit: Cindy Hadish/Save CR Heritage
Members of Save CR Heritage gather to protest the demolition of the Hach Building before the owner razed the building, considered a contributing structure in the New Bohemia Historic District.

The saying “come Hell or high water” means “whatever it takes.” When the high waters really did come to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 2008, the town discovered how to turn a disaster into an opportunity for preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.