Local Preservationists

Eighteenth-Century House Ruin to Be Restored…With Glass

Posted on: December 3rd, 2014 by Meghan O'Connor 25 Comments

 

The Menokin Foundation aims to rehabilitate Menokin, home of Declaration of Independence signer Francis Lightfoot Lee, using structural glass.
The Menokin Foundation aims to rehabilitate Menokin, home of Declaration of Independence signer Francis Lightfoot Lee, using structural glass.

What some people see when they look at Menokin is a collapsed house, an old ruin, a testament to the perils of ignoring preservation.  What the staff and Board at Menokin see, however, is a cutting-edge preservation opportunity.

The Menokin Foundation does not want to restore the house to its original condition. Instead, the Foundation believes Menokin is more valuable to the public in pieces. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O’Connor is the member services assistant at the National Trust. She enjoys learning, writing, and talking about museums, art, architecture, and anything historic.

Hope for the Future: Why We’re Thankful for You in Preservation

Posted on: November 27th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

We've had an incredible year here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and we have much to be thankful for -- namely, you! Thanks to passionate preservationists like you who contribute to our efforts, we're able to continue saving America's historic places in communities around the country -- and the results are moving.

So take a minute this Thanksgiving to check out three remarkable stories that showcase the very best qualities of the preservation movement: its energy, its hope, and its people.


HOPE FOR THE FUTURE by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

From our community to yours, Happy Thanksgiving!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] Round-Up: The Starter Kit for Renovating Historic Homes

Posted on: November 18th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

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Buying a historic house with the intention of fixing it up is a significant undertaking -- and one that can come with its share of surprises. Understanding how to ask the right questions before you begin renovating is key to the overall success of your project. This round-up of toolkits from the 10 on Tuesday vault (now Preservation Tips & Tools) will help give you an idea of what to consider and how to find sensible solutions as you look to restore or rehabilitate your newly acquired treasure. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

This Old House: Fisherman Brown’s Cottage

Posted on: November 17th, 2014 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Susan Pollack

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Susan Pollack and her husband spent years hunting for their dream home, ultimately choosing this 1735 cottage in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The day my husband and I bought our house, the real estate agent gave us a loose-leaf binder with copies of maps and deeds dating back to 1735, when a fisherman named Joseph Brown built the Cape Ann Cottage.

For years we had looked at houses. We’d hoped to find a roomy, if neglected, Victorian that, with our efforts, might one day resemble one of the Gloucester houses celebrated by Edward Hopper. But “an antique?” That’s how our agent described the tiny gambrel-roofed cottage. Seeing its exposed adze-hewn beams, wide pine floorboards and fireplace, we said yes immediately.

I had lived in other people’s homes all of my adult life. Suddenly, I was not only a homeowner, but a steward of a piece of Cape Ann history. What does it mean to acquire a building with an historic marker posted on its clapboards? Does one’s responsibility go beyond keeping cedar shingles on the roof and a satellite dish off it? When you buy a house, do you inherit a responsibility to its history as well?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Kristi Eaton

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This photo shows the Rio Siesta Motel sign along Route 66 in Oklahoma in 1983.

Billboards, the ubiquitous advertising tool that sells everything from toothpaste to cars to dental service, have changed a lot over the years.

Now, a group of sign-makers, community activists, and Route 66 enthusiasts are coming together in Oklahoma to try to preserve and restore historical billboards, murals, and other signs from across the country with the eventual goal to open up a museum dedicated purely to this American tradition. The group envisions the Billboard Museum as an educational museum immersing visitors in the history and how-to of sign making at a yet-to-be determined location along Route 66 in the Oklahoma City metro area.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.