Local Preservationists

No School Left Behind: Saving Montana's Rural Classrooms

Posted on: June 24th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

130624_blog_photo_montanaschool
The little school on the prairie. Rural schoolhouses, like this one in western Montana, may soon exist only in fiction.

Sandy Hart’s grandmother rode her horse to school. Out in rural Montana, wooden bell towers ring in the school day as the stars and stripes flutter atop lone flagpoles.

Tucked among mountains and prairies, these schoolhouses only have one or two classrooms. Yet steeped in the state’s homestead history, the rough hewn logs, clapboard, or cobblestone walls, are -- or were once -- a beacon for learning and community life.

Montana abounds with these one-and-two room schools built to educate children in the countryside. But these schools are getting, literally, left behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

The Abyssinian Meeting House: Maine's Untold African-American Heritage

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

a
The Abyssinian is the third-oldest standing African-American meetinghouse in the U.S. (The first two are in Boston and Nantucket, MA.)

150 years ago, ships anchored and runaway slaves hurriedly disembarked on the Maine State Pier. They covertly walked up India Street onto Newbury Street to the Abyssinian Meeting House in search of help. There, in this humble house of worship, they found it.

The Abyssinian: where William Lloyd Garrison and, locals think, Frederick Douglass gave impassioned speeches while members of the congregation helped those on the Underground Railroad find their way to Canada -- and freedom.

As local preservationist David Paul claims, this was “the black history that nobody told.” ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Ellinwood's Historic Wolf Hotel: Giving Hope to a Hometown

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Chris McCord and business partner Kelli Penner are hoping to turn the National Register-listed Wolf Hotel into a bed and breakfast. Credit: Kelli Penner
Owner Chris McCord and business partner Kelli Penner are hoping to turn the National Register-listed Wolf Hotel into a bed-and-breakfast.

In 117 years, the Italianate-style Wolf Hotel in sleepy Ellinwood, Kan. has had only four owners. The newest, 26-year-old Chris McCord, is still in awe of his new responsibility.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Residence of Hon. John Goetz Jr. c. 1890. Credit: Save Clifton Heights
Residence of Hon. John Goetz Jr., c. 1890

A 19th-century mansion in Cincinnati’s Clifton Heights neighborhood faces possible demolition, and local residents and university students have banded together in an effort to save it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Deer Lodge, Montana's Rialto Theater Rises from the Ashes

Posted on: May 17th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 3 Comments

 

Historic Photo of the Rialto Theater in Deer Lodge, Mont., c. 1942. Credit: Rialto Community Theater, Inc.Ccollection
The Rialto Theater in Deer Lodge, Mont., c. 1942

It’s often said that small towns enjoy an enhanced sense of community; they are places where neighbors work together, help one another, and pitch in for the common good. Nowhere does that seem to be truer than in Deer Lodge, a tiny town of 3,400 located an hour and a half southeast of Missoula, in western Montana.

Since 1921, Deer Lodge's Rialto Theater has sat at the heart of the town, and as the only auditorium in the area, hosted events from rotary talent shows to weekend movies. In 1995, with the National Register-listed theater deteriorating and its ownership no longer able to maintain it, members of the community banded together to form Rialto Community Theater, Inc., a nonprofit that would run the theater and lead a restoration project.

By 2006, the organization had poured more than $100,000 into upgrading the theater. Then, disaster struck.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.