Local Preservationists

Skee's Diner: A Slice of Americana in Progress

Posted on: May 9th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Mallory Somerset, Preservation Intern

Skee’s Diner in Torrington, Conn., c. 2008. Credit: Improbcat, Wikimedia Commons
Skee’s Diner in Torrington, Conn., c. 2008

The American dining car evokes a mid-century nostalgia like nothing else. Perhaps the most recognizable (though not necessarily by name) are dining cars manufactured by the Jerry O’Mahony Company between 1917 and 1941.

Stand-alone Streamline Moderne coaches were manufactured in a factory in New Jersey and brought by flatbed to their final destinations across the States. They had model names like “Victory” and “Monarch” and were built to last 30 years, according to the brochures. Though details such as length and roof shape differ with each model, the interiors are almost identical, and it is this assembly-line sheen of uniformity that give the O’Mahony diners their appeal to vintage diner enthusiasts even today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

The Curtain Rises Again for the Culpeper State Theatre

Posted on: May 8th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Erica Stewart, Manager, Public Affairs

The State Theatre of Culpeper before and after renovation. Credits: LWPrencipe, Flickr; Ed Bednarczyk
The State Theatre of Culpeper before and after renovation

After sitting vacant for almost a decade, the 1938 Art Deco State Theatre of Culpeper, Va., is back in business.

For years, the theatre sat abandoned, coming perilously close to demolition before being purchased by Culpeper natives Greg and Liz Yates. At the time, there was a hole in the ceiling near the stage and the building was seriously dilapidated. But thanks to a committed group of community members, led by the State Theater Foundation, a $9.3 million historic rehabilitation has raised the curtain on the former vaudeville and movie house, revealing a gorgeous 560-seat live theatre.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

A group of former students at the Cleveland Chinese Mission School gathers at the plaque dedication. From left: Fee Joe, Ed Joe, Kellogg Wong, Fun Pang, J.W. Dunn (seated), Annette Joe, Vice Mayor Ted Campbell, and Bobby Moon. Credit: Gilroy and Sally Chow
A group of former students at the Cleveland Chinese Mission School gathers at the plaque dedication. From left: Fee Joe, Ed Joe, Kellogg Wong, Fun Pang, J.W. Dunn (seated), Annette Joe, Vice Mayor Ted Campbell, and Bobby Moon.

The Mississippi Delta Chinese Heritage Museum, as Frieda Quon explains it, is a labor of love -- a project that stems from the desire of the children of Chinese immigrants in the region, like herself, to make sure that their unique history isn’t lost.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Exterior of 508 Park Avenue. Credit: Alan Govenar/508Park, flickr

Robert Johnson was never a rock star, but the 13 tracks the wandering blues musician laid down at the makeshift studio inside 508 Park Avenue in Dallas in 1937 eventually inspired musicians like Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, and Eric Clapton (who even recorded there in 2004). Now, thanks to a $12 million restoration project headed by the Stewpot, a homeless shelter located across the street, the building itself will have an opportunity to do the same for generations of musicians to come.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

By Linda Feagler, senior editor of Ohio Magazine

Ohio Auditorium restored. Credit: PlayhouseSquare Archives
Ohio Auditorium restored

Critics called him crazy.

Even well-wishers who offered Ray Shepardson sincere support couldn’t believe the school administrator’s crusade to preserve four historic theaters in Cleveland, Ohio, could possibly succeed.

But it did -- and then some.

Today, Shepardson’s once improbable effort is Cleveland’s crown jewel: His rescue not only initiated the world’s largest theater restoration project (totaling some $100 million), it transformed that quartet of crumbling venues into a revitalized PlayhouseSquare, one of the largest performing-arts complexes in the country (second only to New York’s Lincoln Center).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.