Local Preservationists

Deconstruction and Discovery: A West Virginia Community Digs into the McCoy Fort's Colonial Past

Posted on: November 15th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Kate Schminky, Public Affairs Intern

The current state of Fort McCoy. A significant chimney foundation is visible on the west side and a lesser defined chimney foundation can be seen on the opposite end. The structure, at 28' x 26', was two stories of nine logs each. Credit: Carolyn Stephens
The current state of the McCoy Fort. A significant chimney foundation is visible on the west side (bottom), while a lesser defined chimney foundation can be seen on the opposite end. The structure, at 28' x 26', was two stories of nine logs each.

Historians were in for a pleasant surprise in 2003 when a local history teacher directed archeologists Kim and Stephen McBride to a barn in West Virginia’s Greenbrier County. McCoy family tradition always suggested that the family’s original homestead was located in the county’s Sinking Valley, but an official discovery had yet to be made -- and no one thought it would involve so many sheep.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

The Denmark Presbyterian Church: A Corner of Tennessee History

Posted on: November 7th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 6 Comments

 

The exterior of the church after restoration was completed. Credit: Big Black Creek Historical Association
The exterior of the Denmark Presbyterian Church after restoration was completed.

With a current population of seven (yes, just seven), you’d think there wouldn’t be much to the town of Denmark in west Tennessee. But the little crossroads just 70-odd miles northeast of Memphis is a place with some oversized history.

Denmark is said to be the oldest Anglo town in West Tennessee, dating roughly to the 1818 treaty that Andrew Jackson signed for the land with the Chickasaw tribe. And contrary to the belief of the 40 or so Danish nationals that visit the town each year, the name is believed to come from the Chickasaw term for their hunting ground.

Most of the area was settled on land grants during the 1820s at three cents an acre. An estimated 50 to 60 percent of those grants remain in the families of their original owners. The town was the largest in the region until the railroads boosted neighbors like the city of Jackson.

And today, the little town’s crown jewel is the Denmark Presbyterian Church.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Written by Katherine Malone-France, Director of Education, Outreach, & Support, Historic Sites Department

The crowd gathers for the Boogie in a open space ringed by historic buildings and pecan, oak, and sassafras trees. Credit: Katherine Malone-France
The crowd gathers for the Boogie in a open space ringed by historic buildings and pecan, oak, and sassafras trees.

When I was growing up in Alabama, we often passed through the small town of Waverly as we travelled along Highway 280 on the way to Auburn football games. I remembered the town primarily for its cemetery with a distinctive stone wall and a collection of small frame houses close to the road.

I had not been through Waverly in years, but, at the end of September, I was fortunate enough to spend a perfect fall day there at an event called the Old 280 Boogie. The Boogie is an outdoor concert that brings together all kinds of people -- musicians, music lovers, artists, and entrepreneurs -- to enjoy, enliven, and be inspired by this historic town in east central Alabama.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

The c. 1829 building became known as the Trojan Hotel in 1915. Credit: Terry and Donald O'Brien
The c. 1829 building became known as the Trojan Hotel in 1915.

When Donald and Terry O’Brien were looking for a new location for O’Briens Public House, their nearly 2-year-old family-run restaurant, a 184-year-old building in downtown Troy, N.Y., caught their eyes.

“My heart was set on the building, because it has so much history,” Terry O’Brien says.

Built c. 1829, the building on Third Street served variously as a stable and livery, bar, hotel, photography unit, and residence (most notably for the Reverend William Irvin, a prominent local resident). From 1897, it served as the Windsor Café and was converted to the Windsor Hotel in 1896.

But it is best known for its years operating as the Trojan Hotel, a name it took on in 1915.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Baltimore's Senator Theatre Restored to Full Art Deco Glory

Posted on: October 10th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

The Senator’s exterior post-restoration, ready for opening night. Credit: Senator Theatre
The Senator’s exterior post-restoration, ready for opening night.

The 1939 Senator Theatre holds a beloved spot in the hearts of Baltimoreans. Just ask co-owner Kathleen Cusack Lyon.

“Everyone has some sort of memory of the theater,” she says. “Everyone went to see It’s A Wonderful Life every Christmas there, went on a first date there, met their husband or wife of 50 years there. Everyone has a story.”

That’s why, when Lyon and her father, James “Buzz” Cusack, bought the Art Deco Senator from the city of Baltimore in 2012, they knew they had to fix the movie theater’s leaky roof and bring it back to its former pre-war glory.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.