Local Preservationists

The (Nearly) Forgotten History of Maxville, Ore.

Posted on: September 27th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

In the Fall issue of Preservation magazine we interview Gwendolyn Trice, whose search for her own history led her to quit her day job in Seattle and relocate to eastern Oregon to preserve the memory of the now-defunct logging town that originally brought her family to the Pacific Northwest.

The town -- known as Maxville -- popped up in the 1920s in Wallowa County, and drew both white and black workers from all of the American South and Midwest. Though the town was segregated, the hard work and brutal weather brought the community together.

You can find the full story in the print edition of Preservation. (Forum Journal also has a great article available for members, titled "Breathing Life into a Ghost Town: The Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center.")

In the meantime, here are some cool photo extras that show the history of Maxville and its community.

Gwendoyn Trice in Maxville. Credit: Colby Kuschatka... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[10 on Tuesday] Toolkit Round-Up: The "Saving Places" Edition

Posted on: September 24th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi

 

With more than a year's worth of toolkits under our belts, we thought it was time to bring back some of the old favorites in case you missed them, lost them, or just wanted to refresh your memory.

This week's edition focuses on all the tips and techniques for getting started in preservation -- from basic definitions to recommended reading to getting your family and community excited about saving places. Let's jump in!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

League Park: Ohio's Lost Ballpark Gets Back in the Game

Posted on: September 20th, 2013 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Jeremy Feador, University Archivist, Ritter Library, Baldwin Wallace University

Outside League Park in Cleveland, between 1900-1910. Credit: Library of Congress
Outside League Park in Cleveland, c. 1900-1910.

Nestled on the corner of East 66th and Lexington Ave are the remnants of Cleveland’s League Park. To say that this plot of grass, remaining ticket house, and partial wall of the park are historic is an understatement.

In 1891, when a 24-year-old Cy Young stepped on the mound for the inaugural game at League Park, he ushered in a period of baseball history that can hardly be rivaled. That day he helped lead the Cleveland Spiders to victory over Cincinnati, 12-3.

Eight years later in 1899, the team set a mark that may never be equaled in baseball history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Imaginations Lift Off at Los Arboles "Rocketship" Park

Posted on: September 12th, 2013 by Lauren Walser 4 Comments

 

The Rocketship Park. Credit: Neil Klemer, Flickr.
The Rocketship Park in Torrance, California.

For generations of children who have grown up in Torrance, Calif., traveling to outer space was as easy as visiting Los Arboles “Rocketship” Park.

The highlight of the 6.3-acre park, completed in the 1960s, has long been the 28-foot-tall rocket ship play structure, purchased from a catalog of playground equipment shortly after a local developer donated the land for the park to the city.

On any given day for the last five decades, park visitors would see children scaling the ladder inside the ship from one level to the next and careening down the metal slide on the outside of the structure.

“Kids feel like they’re blasting off into space,” says Janet Payne, a vice president with Torrance Historical Society.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Clearing the Air: Commemorating Tallahassee's Smokey Hollow Community

Posted on: September 11th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Part of the community of Smokey Hollow in 1963. Credit: Althemese Barnes/John G. Riley House & Museum.
Part of the community of Smokey Hollow in 1963.

Smokey Hollow was a place where neighbors looked out for each other. Founded in the 1890s and located just east of downtown Tallahassee, employment and home ownership stayed high in this middle-class African-American community right up until the 1960s.

Then everything changed.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.