Local Preservationists

 

East Hall, the first building completed in Western Michigan University’s East Campus. Credit: Roger Parzyck.
East Hall, the first building completed in Western Michigan University’s East Campus.

Perched high on a hilltop surverying the city of Kalamazoo, Michigan, is Western Michigan University's East Campus.

Completed in 1905, East Campus -- the first at WMU -- was purchased by the citizens of Kalamazoo and donated to the state with the stipulation that a university was to be built with the acquired land. As several years passed, buildings and halls such as East Hall, West Hall, North Hall, and the Speech and Hearing Building were created.

Then, in December 2012, the University issued a plan to tear down all but East Hall, which it plans to convert into the WMU Alumni Center for $15 million.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

 

San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district was site of the Summer of Love, center of the sixties counterculture momentum. Credit: David Yu Photography.
San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood was site of the Summer of Love, center of the '60s counterculture movement.

"Turn on, tune in, drop out." It was the 1967 Summer of Love in San Francisco, and the Haight-Ashbury district was lighting up in psychedelic color.

In the '60s, Haight-Ashbury, now called the Upper Haight, was a haven for cultural revolutionaries: hippies, artists, and psychedelic rock musicians from Jefferson Airplane to Grateful Dead.

But not all of its hippie history has vaporized disillusioned down the rabbit hole, thanks to local preservationist Norman Larson.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

 


Wigwam Village #2 in Cave City, Kentucky was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. Seven of these roadside motels once stood in Kentucky, Alabama, Arizona, Louisiana, Florida, and California.

In the old days before the interstate, you would take the Dixie Highway, one of the first north-south, cross-country roads in the U.S. Driving with the windows down in a vintage car, you'd see these curious structures emerge on the roadside, beckoning in a retro sign: "Sleep in a Wigwam!"

No, they’re not actually wigwams; in fact, they're formed like tipis. And yes, it may have been one man’s misguided cultural appropriation. But "Wigwam Villages" are an iconic -- if controversial -- piece of American road-travel culture and history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Prentice Women's Hospital: A Eulogy

Posted on: July 15th, 2013 by Guest Writer 4 Comments

 

Written by Anjulie Rao

Anjulie Rao, left. Credit: Mike Hari, fadeoutfoto.com
Anjulie Rao and Prentice Women's Hospital. Headshot photo courtesy of Mike Hari, fadeoutphoto.com

On October 12, 2012, I was thrown out of the Apple store on North Michigan Avenue, Chicago. I may have cried after the employee said, gruffly, he could not help me. Granted, I was overwhelmed by school, tired from the long walk to the store, and was feeling helpless in a city where I was a brand-new citizen.

I left in a hurry, dodging crowds of shoppers and tourists. The noise, the bustle -- it was all too much. The stench of new clothes, the one you wash your brand new jeans twice before wearing to get rid of, filled the air as I walked past the storefronts.

Taking a right, I headed toward the lake down an unknown side street where it felt like the quiet echoed amongst the calamity. This, and the breeze from the lake, drew me in. One block down, it seemed to go silent. Walking past walls of glass, I realized I had entered the Northwestern Hospital corridor. Steel, white concrete, and the glimmering facades enveloped me.

If Chicago was host to the White City of the World's Fair, this street was host to the Glass Village.

And then, she appeared. A monolith of matte concrete, arched and radiating toward the street.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Local Preservationists Dive Into Saving Decorah, Iowa's 1937 Bathhouse

Posted on: July 10th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

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This 1930s bathhouse and outdoor pool in Decorah, Iowa was saved from a more "modern" replacement.

In 2009, when locals began to consider demolishing the Art Moderne, Edward Novak-designed bathhouse at the Municipal Swimming Pool in Decorah, Iowa in favor of erecting a structure over the existing outdoor pool, Kyrl Henderson decided to do something about it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.