Local Preservationists

 

By Sophia Dembling

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Esther Gordy Edwards established the Motown Museum in 1985.

Berry Gordy, founder of Motown, has called his big sister, Esther Gordy Edwards, “bossy” and he knew in 1958 that borrowing money from the family savings club she had established wouldn’t be easy.

“She had power and influence,” Gordy wrote in his autobiography, To Be Loved. “She was a strong businesswoman, and very careful with money. The family depended on Esther to keep these things together.”

Gordy got the fight and the words he’d expected to hear from his sister -- If you’re so smart, why ain’t you rich? And, she continued, “You’re 29 years old and what have you done so far in your life?” In the end, though, Edwards approved an $800 loan -- provided Gordy sign a contract with future royalties as security.

The rest, of course, is music history -- still preserved in Hitsville U.S.A. in Detroit. The museum founded by Edwards in the modest house where some of the greatest hits of the 1960s were recorded by some of the era’s most iconic acts: the Supremes, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, Gladys Knight and the Pips, and a who’s-who of others.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

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Shelby put her new masonry skills to use as a volunteer at the Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park this year.

Last year, right around this time, corpsmembers from the Michigan-based SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps were in the midst of rehabilitating the historic Goffar Barn at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, alongside Lake Michigan.

One corpsmember, Shelby, was not only able to learn while on the job, she was able to take the preservation masonry and repointing skills she had picked up at the Goffar Barn to volunteer her time, and expertise, to another nearby preservation project.

We caught up with Shelby, one year out from her training experience in HOPE Crew, and learned about her new opportunities, including a volunteer masonry project for the Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park in Traverse City, Michigan.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

 

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The exterior of the rehabilitated Firestone Building.

Last year, the rehabilitation of the 1920s Firestone building in Gainesville, Florida was completed. Phoebe Cade Miles (the daughter of Gatorade inventor Dr. James Cade) and her husband, Richard Miles, of the Cade Museum, sponsored the project and worked with father/son team Richard and Ryland Wagner of Joyner Construction to complete the rehabilitation. The project was so well done that the Wagners were recognized by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation with an Honorable Mention for Adaptive Reuse award.

Recently, we sat down with Phoebe and Richard to talk about the Firestone rehabilitation project.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Maddie Gregurek focused her National History Day project on Theodore Roosevelt's leadership and legacy in the conservation movement.

Early this year, high school freshman Maddie Gregurek entered Iowa’s National History Day regional competition (a preliminary round of the Kenneth E. Behring National History Day Contest). Maddie took the competition’s theme, “Leadership and Legacy,” and focused her project on Theodore Roosevelt’s role in the conservation movement.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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San Antonio Missions National Historical Park is a Texas icon, and is on the verge of being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

As the time of writing this, there are six young people in Texas right now learning preservation skills and helping to restore beloved local iconic buildings. These six have joined more than a hundred youth and veterans who have participated in the HOPE Crew program since its inception last March, and like the participants before them, they are learning valuable skills while helping to give back to their community. Another major beneficiary of this initiative has been the property owners. With the ability to gain exposure for their site, supplement current maintenance staff, and access additional sources of funding, participation in the program continues to benefit all partners involved.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Celebrate 50 Years of Preservation In Denver’s Larimer Square

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.
Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.

Not every major city can point to the exact spot where it began, but Denver can.

That spot is Larimer Square, where settler and developer William Larimer and his son first built a 16-by-20-foot log cabin in 1858. After aggressively selling tracts of land to miners and other migrants to the Rocky Mountains, Larimer eventually saw the city of Denver incorporate in 1860.

Although the original cabin was torn down in 1861, the square still stands today as a testament to its namesake’s tenacity and pioneer spirit. There was a time in the 1960s, however, when the future of Larimer Square was threatened by Denver's Urban Renewal Authority, which was attempting to "modernize" the city's skyline. In 1963, preservationist and developer Dana Crawford stepped in to form the Larimer Square Association, eventually succeeding in saving the block-long row of buildings from demolition in 1965 and ensuring their survival into the 21st century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.