Local Preservationists

 

150629_blog-photo_San-Antonio-Missions-National-Historical-Park
San Antonio Missions National Historical Park is a Texas icon, and is on the verge of being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

As the time of writing this, there are six young people in Texas right now learning preservation skills and helping to restore beloved local iconic buildings. These six have joined more than a hundred youth and veterans who have participated in the HOPE Crew program since its inception last March, and like the participants before them, they are learning valuable skills while helping to give back to their community. Another major beneficiary of this initiative has been the property owners. With the ability to gain exposure for their site, supplement current maintenance staff, and access additional sources of funding, participation in the program continues to benefit all partners involved.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Celebrate 50 Years of Preservation In Denver’s Larimer Square

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.
Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.

Not every major city can point to the exact spot where it began, but Denver can.

That spot is Larimer Square, where settler and developer William Larimer and his son first built a 16-by-20-foot log cabin in 1858. After aggressively selling tracts of land to miners and other migrants to the Rocky Mountains, Larimer eventually saw the city of Denver incorporate in 1860.

Although the original cabin was torn down in 1861, the square still stands today as a testament to its namesake’s tenacity and pioneer spirit. There was a time in the 1960s, however, when the future of Larimer Square was threatened by Denver's Urban Renewal Authority, which was attempting to "modernize" the city's skyline. In 1963, preservationist and developer Dana Crawford stepped in to form the Larimer Square Association, eventually succeeding in saving the block-long row of buildings from demolition in 1965 and ensuring their survival into the 21st century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Saving Savannah: The Preservation Legacy of Anna Colquitt Hunter

Posted on: June 2nd, 2015 by Guest Writer

 

By Sophia Dembling

150601_blog-photo_davenport-post-restoration
The proposed demolition of the Isaiah Davenport House was the catalyst that spurred Anna Colquitt Hunter to fight to preserve Savannah's historic relics.

Savannah is so closely identified with its gracious architecture and elegant squares, it's hard to believe that at one time, all that was at risk. If it weren't for the energy and savvy of Anna Colquitt Hunter, who set preservation in motion in Savannah, the city today might have a lot less charm and a lot more parking lots.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series has guided you through the wilderness of managing your personal expectations during a preservation project, understanding the difference between federal, state, and local preservation groups, and fundraising basics. Today, we’re going to help you navigate through the tricky thicket of historic designations.

For professional preservationists, historic designations are among the primary go-to factors to consider when trying to save a historic site or property. However, for people who don’t spend their days steeped in historic preservation, it’s not always easy to determine what separates a national landmark from a local one -- not to mention all the stops in between.

These tips will help you better understand the difference between federal, state, and local designations, their benefits, and their application processes.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Interview] Matthew Silva, Modern Champion for a “Modern Ruin”

Posted on: May 18th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi

 


Modern Ruin: A World's Fair Pavilion - Promo I from Matthew Silva on Vimeo.

For the past three years, the futuristic New York State Pavilion -- a National Treasure looking for a new future of its own – has enchanted many people with its dramatic design and World Fair history. One of those people became so enchanted that he decided to make a film about the structure -- a passion project that quickly grew into a larger grassroots campaign to save the Pavilion.

That person is Matthew Silva, co-founder of People for the Pavilion and the filmmaker behind the documentary “Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion.” His tireless efforts behind the camera, on social media, and at the site itself have not only helped get more people talking about the Pavilion, but it’s brought them together as well, focusing their energy on reinvention for an inventive space.

This week, the documentary that started it all three years ago is having its world premiere. So before the curtain goes up, we chatted with Silva to learn more about his fascinating route from schoolteacher to filmmaker to preservation advocate.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

150506_blog-photo_this-place-matters-kiri-carini
Next City Vanguard conference attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a #ThisPlaceMatters-themed photo walk in Reno, hosted by the National Trust.

Successful tactical urbanism projects around the U.S. -- from parklets to pop-up shops -- show that sometimes all it takes to bring a community together is a simple, accessible project. That’s why this month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation is once again encouraging people in neighborhoods around the country to celebrate their connections to place through the organization’s “This Place Matters” campaign. (May is Preservation Month.)

“‘This Place Matters’ started in 2008 as a way for people to shine a spotlight on the historic places that played a role in their lives. Basically, it’s like crowdsourcing people’s personal connections to the built environment,” says Jason Clement, director of community outreach at the National Trust. “And the best part -- there are zero rules. These can be places that are large or small, nationally significant or personally priceless, historic or maybe just old. They just have to mean something to you.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.