Landscapes

Lighting the Coast and Heart: Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse

Posted on: June 20th, 2013 by Paulina Tam

 

Golden hour at Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse. Credit: adwriter, Flickr

Since its first christening in 1856, Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts -- one of the sites on our 2013 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places -- has lighted the passage home for ships and travelers returning from sea in the Atlantic Coast. It was and still is a celebrated artifact of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah, a Native American Tribe; the citizens of Aquinnah, Massachusetts; and the hearts of many outside visitors.

However, a much darker light has been casting its rays upon the historical lighthouse in recent years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery Celebrates 175 Years

Posted on: June 3rd, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

An exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York titled “A Beautiful Way To Go” commemorates Green-Wood Cemetery’s 175th anniversary. Credit: Museum of the City of New York
An exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York titled “A Beautiful Way To Go” commemorates Green-Wood Cemetery’s 175th anniversary.

The word “cemetery” conjures images of gloomy gravestones and a sense of dread in the American imagination, but it wasn’t always this way. Nearly two centuries ago, civic leaders in New York established Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery, providing not only a hallowed place to bury loved and well-respected residents, but an airy, open green space that provided a retreat from the chaos of the city.

This summer, the Museum of the City of New York is featuring an exhibit to commemorate the 175th anniversary of this outdoor community space that predated both Central Park and Prospect Park, titled “A Beautiful Way to Go.” The exhibit will interweave art, architecture, and landscape with social and cultural history, and will also feature contemporary photos of the cemetery in all four seasons by photographer Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Conservation and the Constitution Meet at James Madison's Montpelier

Posted on: April 17th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Exterior of Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust. Credit: Peggy Harrison
The front of Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

When most people think of James Madison’s Montpelier, they think of it as the home of America’s 4th president and the birthplace of what was to become the Constitution of the United States. But there’s another side to this bastion of American democracy that sits near the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains about 90 minutes southwest of Washington, D.C.

More than just the iconic mansion, Montpelier sits of 2,650 acres of land that includes gardens, archaeological sites, forested trails, and old-growth forests. Much of the landscape is nearly the same as it was when Madison actually lived here, and that’s by design. Madison himself would be proud.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

America's Antiquities Act Makes History with Five New National Monuments

Posted on: March 26th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director, Public Lands Policy

Rio Grande del Norte (Ute Mtn.) Credit: Adriel Heisey
Río Grande del Norte National Monument

Just a few days out from the beginning of the baseball season in Washington, D.C., President Obama batted in a Grand Slam with the establishment of five new national monuments. This is the first time the President has designated more than one national monument in a day, and every single one of them is rich in historic or cultural resources.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Arlington House Woods: Can We Reach a Compromise?

Posted on: March 7th, 2013 by Rob Nieweg 2 Comments

 

Arlington House also known as the Robert E. Lee Memorial in Arlington National Cemetery. Section 32 of the cemetery is in the foreground. Credit: Protoant via Wikimedia Commons
Arlington House, also known as the Robert E. Lee Memorial, in Arlington National Cemetery. Section 32 of the cemetery is in the foreground.

Sometimes, good ideas threaten historic places -- and that's when preservationists and their allies look for better ideas.

A timely example: The Army Corps of Engineers is expanding Arlington National Cemetery to meet the growing demand for burial sites. For example, the 42-acre Navy Annex site adjacent to the cemetery is being cleared right now to provide many thousands of new burial sites.

No one objects to the idea of providing an honored resting place for our nation’s military veterans. To make room for still more burials, however, the Army Corps plans in 2013 to fell 1,700 trees and cut-and-fill a 27-acre stream valley in Arlington House Woods, the cherished forest surrounding the 1802 Arlington House.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Rob Nieweg

Rob Nieweg

Rob Nieweg is a Field Director & Attorney for the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He leads the National Trust’s Washington Field Office, which works to save historic resources in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. He has worked as a preservation advocate since 1989.