Landscapes

Five Reasons We Support the Antiquities Act

Posted on: March 29th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy, Government Relations and Policy

View from the Effigy Mounds National Monument, north of Marquette, Iowa, along the Mississippi River. Credit: greenheron47, flickr
View from the Effigy Mounds National Monument, north of Marquette, Iowa, along the Mississippi River

This past week, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on H.R. 1459, the “Ensuring Public Involvement in the Creation of National Monument Act.” The bill’s title is misleading: What the legislation actually proposes is to curtail the President’s ability to act swiftly to establish or expand the designation of national monuments on federally owned or controlled property in order to protect sites, objects, and landscapes of historic, cultural, or scientific interest.

President Obama has used this law 10 times to great effect since 2011 to protect a wide array of places that have played a vital role in our country’s history -- places such as Fort Monroe in Virginia, Chimney Rock in Colorado, César E. Chávez in California, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad in Maryland, and El Rio Grande Del Norte in New Mexico.

Unfortunately, the House voted 222-201 to pass this problematic piece of legislation, mostly along party lines with 10 Republicans crossing over to oppose the bill and three Democrats voting to support the bill. Now that the House has passed it, the bill moves over to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee; if favorably reported out of this committee, it will land before the full Senate for consideration.

Be assured that we at the National Trust and our allies will continue to educate the members of the Senate on the flaws of H.R. 1459 in order to defeat this bill and preserve the Act’s power. Let’s start with the top five reasons we support the Antiquities Act.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

10 Preservation Wins in 2013

Posted on: December 30th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 9 Comments

 

For anyone worried that year '13 would prove unlucky for the beautiful places in our midst, take heart: Though we did lose some irreplaceable historic places this past year, we also celebrated a remarkable number of preservation wins throughout the country. Let's look back at some of 2013's biggest success stories and get inspired for the year ahead!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Lighting the Coast and Heart: Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse

Posted on: June 20th, 2013 by Paulina Tam

 

Golden hour at Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse. Credit: adwriter, Flickr

Since its first christening in 1856, Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts -- one of the sites on our 2013 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places -- has lighted the passage home for ships and travelers returning from sea in the Atlantic Coast. It was and still is a celebrated artifact of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah, a Native American Tribe; the citizens of Aquinnah, Massachusetts; and the hearts of many outside visitors.

However, a much darker light has been casting its rays upon the historical lighthouse in recent years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery Celebrates 175 Years

Posted on: June 3rd, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

An exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York titled “A Beautiful Way To Go” commemorates Green-Wood Cemetery’s 175th anniversary. Credit: Museum of the City of New York
An exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York titled “A Beautiful Way To Go” commemorates Green-Wood Cemetery’s 175th anniversary.

The word “cemetery” conjures images of gloomy gravestones and a sense of dread in the American imagination, but it wasn’t always this way. Nearly two centuries ago, civic leaders in New York established Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery, providing not only a hallowed place to bury loved and well-respected residents, but an airy, open green space that provided a retreat from the chaos of the city.

This summer, the Museum of the City of New York is featuring an exhibit to commemorate the 175th anniversary of this outdoor community space that predated both Central Park and Prospect Park, titled “A Beautiful Way to Go.” The exhibit will interweave art, architecture, and landscape with social and cultural history, and will also feature contemporary photos of the cemetery in all four seasons by photographer Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Conservation and the Constitution Meet at James Madison's Montpelier

Posted on: April 17th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Exterior of Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust. Credit: Peggy Harrison
The front of Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

When most people think of James Madison’s Montpelier, they think of it as the home of America’s 4th president and the birthplace of what was to become the Constitution of the United States. But there’s another side to this bastion of American democracy that sits near the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains about 90 minutes southwest of Washington, D.C.

More than just the iconic mansion, Montpelier sits of 2,650 acres of land that includes gardens, archaeological sites, forested trails, and old-growth forests. Much of the landscape is nearly the same as it was when Madison actually lived here, and that’s by design. Madison himself would be proud.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.