Interviews

[Interview] Elizabeth Ellsworth, Maven of Midcentury Modern

Posted on: January 28th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Elizabeth Ellsworth stands in front of her Bimel Kehm house. Credit: Elizabeth Ellsworth

After retiring from a career as a marketing executive, Elizabeth Ellsworth began buying and restoring once-beautiful homes that had been tarnished by lack of maintenance or improper additions. In late 2012, she purchased the Island House. Built in 1954, it’s one of three residences designed by Bimel Kehm in New Canaan, Connecticut.

I called Elizabeth to get the skinny on the talented but enigmatic architect, her love for the house, and her restoration work.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 


Rebecca Buntrock observing roof construction at the UVA Jefferson's Rotunda, part of her work as a preservation engineer at Robert Silman Associates.

Usually when people have a big fix-it project on their to-do list, they borrow tools and supplies. At the National Trust, we borrow preservation engineers.

Meet Rebecca Buntrock, our 2012 Robert Silman Fellow for Preservation Engineering. This six-month position is sponsored by Rebecca's employer, Robert Silman Associates (RSA), a firm known nationwide for their special expertise in the engineering of historic buildings, with notable preservation projects including the Guggenheim, Fallingwater, and Ellis Island.

During her tenure at the National Trust, Rebecca worked closely with our Historic Sites department on cool projects at a number of sites, including:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Open for Business Again at Pittsburgh's Market Square Place

Posted on: December 12th, 2012 by Julia Rocchi 9 Comments

 

Several years ago, Market Square Place was just a series of historic buildings on three different streets with different styles and heights, all suffering from decades of neglect. Some saw this as a case for demolition, but the City of Pittsburgh saw an opportunity to promote green urban living.

A public-private partnership brought the historic buildings together into a single mixed-use complex that now boasts residences, retail storefronts, and a YMCA, all with facades that have been restored to their original 1930s appearance. This successful reinvention as a fresh, eco-friendly community earned Market Square Place an Honor Award at the 2012 Richard H. Driehaus National Preservation Awards -- and the approval of the surrounding neighborhood.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Meeting Lincoln Through the Emancipation Proclamation

Posted on: November 28th, 2012 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

The historical drama Lincoln, now in theaters, brings the 16th president's fight for the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery to the big screen -- and with it a certain amount of celebrity status for Honest Abe. But is it the full story?

To find out, we turned to President Lincoln's Cottage, one of the National Trust's Historic Sites. The modest home in Washington, DC, served as Lincoln’s family residence for a quarter of his presidency during the summers of 1862, 1863, and 1864 -- and he was living there when he developed his Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, an important part of the timeline leading to the 13th Amendment.

Now the Proclamation has come home to roost (in a manner of speaking): The Cottage is the first public venue to display a rare, signed copy of the historic document recently purchased by David Rubenstein. It's on display now through the end of February 2013 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation's signing.

To better understand this exhibit's significance -- and the document's impact on the course of history -- we checked in with Erin Carlson Mast, the director at the Cottage, to ask her some timely questions.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

Two weeks ago while in New Orleans, I found myself having a familiar moment at the corner of Tulane Avenue and South Tonti Street, the intersection where one of my favorite buildings in the world -- the old Dixie Brewery -- sits abandoned.

I've made a habit out of checking in on it every time I'm in town, and this visit played out much like my past pilgrimages.

After thumb-typing my way through some requisite Instagramming, Foursquaring, Facebooking, and tweeting, I took off my headphones and sat quietly on the curb, surveying Dixie's bruises and black eyes from my ant's eye view. Unlike the narrow streets of the French Quarter, where the Big Easy high steps by you with the garishness of a Zatarain's commercial, this section of the city can be very quiet -- eerily and somewhat mesmerizingly so.

After at least five minutes of undisturbed building gazing, I was rattled back to reality by the thunderous approach of the 39 bus. As I motioned to the driver that I wasn't actually waiting for a ride, I chuckled to myself about how weird the whole thing must have looked -- just me, the curb, a derelict building, and an empty plastic grocery bag scratching down the street.

After a bit more reflection, though, I think my New Orleans experience is no different than the feeling a lot of preservationists have and are often caught acting on: Sometimes, when you really love a place, you've just got to sit with it for a little bit. You know, take it all in.

It’s the same feeling I got -- or more accurately, that got me -- earlier this year when I walked into Miami Marine Stadium for the first time. Between the awe-inspiring roof (is it modern architecture or alien spacecraft?) and the sensation you get of literally floating on the water, this National Treasure is a wow place in every sense of the word. Just like in New Orleans, the only thing I could do was sit down and take it all in. And unlike Tulane Avenue, the stadium has seats.

Though it has been shuttered since 1992, Miami Marine Stadium is no stranger to folks like me who find themselves needing a moment to absorb what they see. On any given day, its basin is alive with rowers who drift by to marvel at all the interesting shapes, both of the building and the graffiti that covers it.

Photographers are another common sight. Some gain entrance illegally and snap shots when they think no one is looking. Others, like Jay Koenigsberg, ask for permission and get to spend some real quality time with the stadium. The proof is in the pictures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.