Interviews

 

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The Julia Morgan-designed Chinese YWCA of San Francisco was built in 1932 and now houses the Chinese Historical Society.

Though many people know Julia Morgan as the architect of iconic Hearst Castle, she also designed buildings on more modest budgets. One of her best is the Chinese YWCA (1932) in San Francisco, now the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Sacred Native American Sites: Bear Butte and Wind Cave

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

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Bear Butte State Park, which the Lakota refer to as Mato Paha and the Cheyenne call Noahvose, was established as a state park in 1961.

The Black Hills of South Dakota offer inspiring landscapes with a rugged vitality steeped in history and tradition. In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, writer Reed Karaim documents his journey through the sacred lands that have been home to Native American tribes for generations.

Along the way he visits two of the region’s most enchanting natural wonders -- Bear Butte and Wind Cave -- and speaks with Jace DeCory, member of the Lakota-Cheyenne River Sioux tribe and assistant professor of American Indian Studies at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

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Left: Gary Martinez of Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Right: The marquee and facade of the restored Saenger Theatre in New Orleans.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we take a peek behind the curtain at the newly renovated Kings Theatre in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Seized during the 1970s in lieu of back taxes, the historic venue idled vacant until the New York City Economic Development Corporation issued a Request for Proposals to restore it in 2008.

A consortium of groups participated in the project, spearheaded by ACE Theatrical Group and Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Below are excerpts from our wide-ranging conversation with Gary Martinez, president and principal at Martinez+Johnson. [The interview has been edited for length and clarity.]... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

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Author Jamie Ford at the Panama Hotel (left), actress Stephanie Kim as Keiko and actor Jose Abaoag as Henry in Book-It Theatre's stage adaptation of Ford's novel "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet" (right).

“A silent character.” That’s how Jamie Ford, author of “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet,” describes the Panama Hotel, the titular National Treasure that grounds his bestselling novel. But the Panama is far from silent; it continues to bustle with tours and visitors, giving them a glimpse into Ford’s fictional world while also portraying the true and moving history of Japanese-American internment in the United States.

As both author and preservationist, Ford is in a unique position to comment on the significance of place in his well-known work. So we chatted with him to find out more – like why he chose to incorporate the hotel in his book in the first place, how it felt to introduce the hotel to an international audience, and why we should all aim to become part of a greater “story chain.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Interview] Roberley Bell: Finding Form in Chesterwood’s Landscape

Posted on: May 26th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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Roberley Bell is Chesterwood's 2015 artist-in-residence.

Earlier this month, Chesterwood -- a National Trust historic site -- announced that sculptor Roberley Bell was selected as their May 2015 artist-in-residence. During her month-long residency, Bell will complete a new project she calls “object a day.” This project documents Bell’s daily encounters with and reactions to sculptor Daniel Chester French’s studio, family residence, and formal gardens and woodland paths via a sculpted object.

On May 30, Chesterwood will host a talk and reception with Bell about her experience at Chesterwood and the results of her project. Before the elegant affair, we chatted with Bell to learn more about how Chesterwood has influenced her creative process.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Interview] Matthew Silva, Modern Champion for a “Modern Ruin”

Posted on: May 18th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi

 


Modern Ruin: A World's Fair Pavilion - Promo I from Matthew Silva on Vimeo.

For the past three years, the futuristic New York State Pavilion -- a National Treasure looking for a new future of its own – has enchanted many people with its dramatic design and World Fair history. One of those people became so enchanted that he decided to make a film about the structure -- a passion project that quickly grew into a larger grassroots campaign to save the Pavilion.

That person is Matthew Silva, co-founder of People for the Pavilion and the filmmaker behind the documentary “Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion.” His tireless efforts behind the camera, on social media, and at the site itself have not only helped get more people talking about the Pavilion, but it’s brought them together as well, focusing their energy on reinvention for an inventive space.

This week, the documentary that started it all three years ago is having its world premiere. So before the curtain goes up, we chatted with Silva to learn more about his fascinating route from schoolteacher to filmmaker to preservation advocate.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.