Interviews

The Truth Behind the TV Show Manhattan: Part I

Posted on: September 11th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 10 Comments

 

An image from WGN's Manhattan shows a recreation of a nuclear testing site.
A scene from WGN's Manhattan depicts a nuclear testing site in Los Alamos, New Mexico.

If you’re not watching the new series Manhattan on WGN, you should start. Why? Because this depiction of the Manhattan Project captures all the drama, intrigue, and suspense of the atomic era’s dawn -- and shows that fact can be just as fascinating as fiction.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Interview] Q & A with Musician and Design Blogger Moby

Posted on: September 5th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 4 Comments

 

The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles. Credit Moby
The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles

In our conversation with Moby for the upcoming Fall 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, he had so many interesting things to say that we didn’t have room for the whole interview in print. Read on for an extended version of our talk with the multitalented electronic musician and DJ, whose writings and photographs of local buildings are showcased on his blog Moby Los Angeles Architecture. An avid architecture and preservation buff, Moby has also shared with us some photos of his restored 1920s house in Los Angeles, which you can see below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

CityLove: Seattle According to Linnea Westerlind

Posted on: August 8th, 2014 by Grant Stevens 1 Comment

 

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Credit: Linnea Westerlind

As part of the CityLove blog series, we wanted to highlight a local leader -- someone who is living the preservation-minded life in the city. For Seattle, we spoke with Linnea Westerlind about all things park-related.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

 

Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp. Credit: HistoricalGood.org
Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp.

For a group of teenagers in Southborough, Massachusetts, summer vacation came with a mission: saving a 167-year-old mansion.

Known as the Burnett/Garfield House, the Second Empire-style stone structure at 84 Main Street was built c. 1847 as the home of businessman Joseph Burnett and his wife, Josephine. Burnett, an active town leader, created the first liquid vanilla extract commercially produced and sold in the United States.

When it was reported earlier this summer that the mansion’s current owner was considering selling it to a developer who would seek demolition, a group led by local teenagers Bridget Brady, 14, and Jen Fox, 15, rallied to save the 2 ½-story structure, which requires sizable repairs.

“Everything else is fixable,” Brady says, “but demolition isn’t.”

Late last month, in the wake of the group’s protests, the current owner decided not to move forward on the sale. The story isn’t over, though. A full renovation is estimated to cost upwards of $1.5 million.

But given the outpouring of local support to save the house, led in large part by this group of teenagers, the future of the house looks significantly brighter.

We spoke with Bridget Brady, who’s starting her freshman year of high school this fall, about the history of the Burnett/Garfield House and why she felt compelled to save it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

CityLove: Philadelphia According to Local Preservationist Liz Maillie

Posted on: July 19th, 2014 by Grant Stevens

 

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Liz Maillie, Philadelphia. Credit: Liz Maillie

As part of the CityLove blog series, we wanted to highlight a local leader -- someone who is living the preservation-minded life in the city. For the City of Brotherly Love, we spoke with Liz Maillie about all things Philly.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.