Green

Beyond Green Building: Morning Roundup

Posted on: September 7th, 2007 by Patrice Frey

 

News to keep you in the know -- Energy Use and Policy

  • Coal Use To Grow Despite Green Concern  -- ENN.  Coal use grew by 30 percent in the last five years and future demand will likely fuel more power plant construction despite environmentalists' opposition, the head of U.S. coal mining company Peabody Energy said on Thursday.
  • U.S. Geothermal Energy Sector Promising  -- Reuters. Geothermal energy could fill a sizable chunk of United States electricity requirements if legislative, technological and other challenges are met, a senior U.S. Department of Energy official said.
  • APEC rift opens over climate change debate-- Reuters. Leaders at an Asia-Pacific summit appeared deadlocked on Thursday over what their "Sydney Declaration" on climate change and cutting greenhouse gas emissions should say. The Climate Change Wars.
  • GAO Faults Agencies Over Global Warming  - ENN.  GAO Criticizes federal agencies for lack of action on climate related issues.
  • Green Valley in WalMart's Back Yard  -- Washington Post.   Will Fayetteville " become to sustainability what Detroit is to the automotive industry and the Silicon Valley is to technology"??
  • Love it? Check the Label  -- NYT.   "Buy American" is back.

Green Building

  • Minnesota Creates Green Building Certification Program  The Minnesota GreenStar program is a new standards program that will certify environmentally friendly building practices for new and existing buildings alike, as well as remodeling and building addition projects.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beyond Green Building: Morning Roundup

Posted on: September 6th, 2007 by Patrice Frey

 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Why “Beyond Green Building?”

Posted on: September 5th, 2007 by Patrice Frey

 

There is great enthusiasm (understandably) among environmentalists about green buildings innovations, such as new materials that contain low embodied energy, highly efficient HVAC systems, and thermally resistant windows. And since about 40% of carbon emissions in the United States are attributed to buildings, there is good reason to construct more environmentally friendly buildings.

But I often find the exuberance about green building a bit troubling. In my view, we find ourselves facing significant environmental challenges largely because of our culture of disposability – whether it's plastic water bottles we toss in landfills, or buildings we mow down after 20 years when they’ve served their "useful life." Thermally resistant windows and green roofs won't fix the problem.

That's why I think this is such an exciting time for the field of historic preservation. As the antithesis of disposability, preservation encompasses two things that are essential to any sustainable society: valuing what we have and planning for the future. Preservationists inherently place value on what has been handed down to us from the past, and plan so that these resources can be enjoyed now and protected for future generations. That's the very definition of sustainability.

I've settled with the name "Beyond Green Building" because I hope this blog will help advance the discussion beyond our fixation with green building, to a conversation about what really makes for a sustainable society.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beyond Green Building: Morning Roundup

Posted on: September 5th, 2007 by Patrice Frey

 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beyond Green Building: Morning Roundup

Posted on: September 4th, 2007 by Patrice Frey

 

Welcome to my first “Morning Roundup." Today's stories are below. I’m also including some good finds from last week, since news was a bit slow over the Labor Day weekend.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.