Green

20 Historic Buildings You Didn't Know Were Green

Posted on: August 5th, 2013 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Christopher Davis, LEEDAP BD+C, ND, US Green Building Council

1894: Colorado State Capitol, Denver, CO. Credit: Photo Phiend, Flickr
Built in 1894, Colorado State Capitol, Denver, Colo. is now LEED certified.

You can read the full, original post at USGBC.org.

Here at USGBC we may be celebrating our 20th anniversary, but the buildings that have achieved LEED certification embody a history that stretches far deeper into the past than 1993. In fact, we recently certified the oldest LEED buildings both in the United States (Fay House at Harvard University, built in 1807) and in the world (a Venetian Gothic palazzo from 1453!).

These remarkable historic green buildings are not alone. Dozens of historic buildings have become LEED certified, and some of them are already well-known, like the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and Chicago’s Merchandise Mart. These projects are incredible examples of how historic preservation and environmental sustainability can work hand in hand, and how saving the past can enrich the future.

Below we present 20 green historic buildings, one constructed in each decade of the last 200 years:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Chris Warren for Preservation magazine

Solar panel installation at Mystic Seaport Collections Research Center. The brick parapet is visible in the background. Credit: Mystic Seaport
Solar panel installation at Mystic Seaport Collections Research Center. The brick parapet is visible in the background.

As covered in the Summer 2013 issue of Preservation magazine, it would be hard to come up with a more high-profile and historically significant place to install solar panels than Alcatraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. But as the price of solar panels and equipment continues to fall and people generally get more comfortable with this source of clean energy, it no longer requires a large chunk of federal dollars (which was the case with Alcatraz) and years of effort for historic buildings to tap the sun to meet their electricity needs.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Old Milwaukee Is New Again: Pabst Brewhouse Becomes Brewhouse Inn & Suites

Posted on: May 6th, 2013 by David Robert Weible

 

Original PBR campus. Credit: Brewhouse Inn & Suites
The Brewhouse, part of the original Pabst campus, built in 1892.

Milwaukee is a hard-nosed town. It was built on heavy machinery, third shifters, and the no-nonsense beer they drank after the whistle blew. And though decades of decline had left the city largely stale and generally unpalatable, Milwaukeeans -- true to form -- brewed up a solution and followed a cue from one of their city’s icons, Pabst Blue Ribbon: They started to take old Milwaukee and make it cool again.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Slideshow] A Classic Boca Raton Cottage Goes Green

Posted on: April 24th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

A drawing by architect Larry Barrow shows the landscaping plans for the finished house. Credit: Larry Barrow
A drawing by architect Larry Barrow shows the landscaping plans for the finished house.

When Christopher Warren decided to restore a cottage in Boca Raton, Fla., built in 1926 and designed by renowned South Florida architect Addison Mizner, his top priority was turning it into a comfortable living space for his five-person family.

It wasn’t until he spoke with architect Larry Barrow that he started to consider the possibility that they could accomplish that goal while also making the former one-story cottage as green as possible.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Conservation and the Constitution Meet at James Madison's Montpelier

Posted on: April 17th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Exterior of Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust. Credit: Peggy Harrison
The front of Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

When most people think of James Madison’s Montpelier, they think of it as the home of America’s 4th president and the birthplace of what was to become the Constitution of the United States. But there’s another side to this bastion of American democracy that sits near the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains about 90 minutes southwest of Washington, D.C.

More than just the iconic mansion, Montpelier sits of 2,650 acres of land that includes gardens, archaeological sites, forested trails, and old-growth forests. Much of the landscape is nearly the same as it was when Madison actually lived here, and that’s by design. Madison himself would be proud.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.