Green

Colorado's 1911 Silverton School Hits Preservation High

Posted on: February 3rd, 2014 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Silverton’s 1911 school serves grades K-12 and sits at 9,305 feet above sea level. Credit: Scott Smith
Silverton’s 1911 school serves grades K-12 and sits at 9,305 feet above sea level.

Everything is a little tougher in Silverton, Colo. Take, for example, breathing. At more than 9,300 feet, the town of some-600 sits in pretty thin air.

Then there’s the issue of getting there. Accessible only by high-mountain pass or the historic Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, making the trek is nothing to sneeze at.

Needless to say, residents of this former mining town and National Register Historic District in southwestern Colorado are a hearty bunch, so when it came time to preserve their historic 1911 schoolhouse, there were no ifs, ands, or buts about it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

The Image of Urban Vitality: Is It Really Just Skyscrapers?

Posted on: January 9th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

By Mike Powe and Jeana Wiser, Preservation Green Lab

View of Manhattan from Brooklyn. Credit: SmartSign.com
View of Manhattan from Brooklyn.

When you picture the heart of a thriving city, what image comes to mind? You might picture a New York avenue, lined with spectacular, towering skyscrapers. The image of a successful city seems inextricably tied to images of buildings stretching into the air.

It turns out, however, that the skyscraper may not deserve such a tight link to our idea of urban vitality. A better image? Look to the neighborhoods just beyond the shadows of downtown’s corporate and condo towers, in the modest (yet bustling!) blocks of older, smaller buildings.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

What Greenbuild 2013 Means for Historic Preservation

Posted on: December 13th, 2013 by Priya Chhaya

 

Scene from Greenbuild 2009. Credit: jikatu, Flickr

If we truly want to claim, as Carl Elefante did in 2007, that “the greenest building is one that is already built” then we must do our part to embrace the values that bind us to the environmental movement--a concern for making places better for people and the world we live in. -- Mark Huppert, Senior Director, Preservation Green Lab

Saving places is not always the act of a single individual. It involves partnerships and cooperation of advocates in every corner of a community. The same can be said for our commitment to sustainable historic preservation. As preservationists we’ve been using Elefante’s words as a rallying cry for decades, but talking to ourselves about “the greenest building” only get us so far.

Last month the Preservation Green Lab (PGL) attended and presented at Greenbuild 2013, the annual conference for green and sustainability advocates across the world. While there, PGL senior director Mark Huppert saw three possible points where preservation can improve its intersection with sustainability.

He shared his full thoughts over at the Preservation Leadership Forum blog earlier this week. Here are some highlights from his post:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

[10 on Tuesday] Toolkit Round-Up: Green Historic Home Edition

Posted on: November 26th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Job Corps, Grey Towers. Credit: USDAgov, Flickr.

Sustainability is a hot topic in preservation (as evidenced by the great work of our Preservation Green Lab), because it's a natural intersection of values. When we say "sustainable" in the context of historic preservation, we’re talking about using what we already have -- in this case, buildings, and the features and materials that make them unique and historic.

In this week's toolkit round-up, we share with you three presentations that bring sustainability to your front door and help you achieve a "green" historic home -- from ways to weatherize your historic home to methods for retrofitting your historic windows. Thanks for helping the earth ... and a historic place!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

What Los Angeles Taught Me about Building Reuse From the Inside Out

Posted on: November 8th, 2013 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Jeana Wiser, Project Coordinator, Preservation Green Lab

The popular monthly Downtown Art Walk attracts over 25,000 visitors and includes over 50 art gallery spaces and exhibits. Credit: mikeywally, Flickr
The popular monthly Downtown Art Walk attracts over 25,000 visitors and includes over 50 art gallery spaces and exhibits.

I think it’s safe to say that many people think of cars and sprawl when they think of Los Angeles. Granted, that is part of the LA story, but it’s definitely not the whole story. As a recent transplant to Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA), I am constantly learning new things about Los Angeles that challenge many of the commonly held beliefs about the City of Angels.

One of the most interesting attributes of Los Angeles, especially as it relates to historic and old buildings, is the culture of ‘reuse’ that exists in many parts of the city. Most famously, the downtown historic core has been using the innovative Adaptive Reuse Ordinance (ARO) for the past 14 years in an effort to re-imagine downtown as a 24/7 activity center with more full-time residents.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.