Green

CityLove: Meet Seattle

Posted on: July 24th, 2014 by Grant Stevens 1 Comment

 

CityLove Header: Learn More!

140724_blog_photo_MeetSeattle_SeattleSkyline_Globalimages

Earlier this week, I heard my colleague Jeana Wiser of the Preservation Green Lab (PGL) use a phrase that has stuck with me for days: “anchors of authenticity.”

Jeana used the phrase to describe what the adaptive reuse of buildings provides to a neighborhood. PGL, a subsidiary of the National Trust, is headquartered in Seattle, our most recent CityLove city, and the more I read about Seattle, the more I think they have taken the "anchor of authenticity" phrase to heart.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

In Deep Water: Three Ways to Save Historic Places from Climate Threats

Posted on: June 26th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Mark Huppert, Senior Director, Preservation Green Lab

Credit: Patrick Rohe, Flickr
The National Park Service had to move Cape Hatteras Lighthouse inland to prevent it from being lost at sea. 

Increasingly intense and frequent weather events -- from flooding in the South and East to persistent drought across the West -- pose a real and severe threat to historic resources across a landscape as diverse as the United States itself. The good news: In spite of the magnitude and scale of the issue, people across the country are taking action and making an impact -- and you can, too.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] Retrofitting Historic Windows

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 3 Comments

 

Now that we have a beautiful, new Preservation Tips & Tools template, we're looking back at some of our most popular "10 on Tuesday" toolkits and giving them a refresh with our new look. 

Windows are the most visible, yet most commonly underappreciated, components of older and historic homes and buildings.

In addition to adding beauty and character, original windows serve a great purpose -- they connect the outside of the building to the inside and, as an integral part of the architecture, offer invaluable clues to a building's history.

Despite this value, however, historic windows often get the blame for a building’s energy loss. Most often, people jump to replace their historic windows because a) companies promise that their replacement windows will save clients time and money, and b) it’s promoted as the "green" thing to do. In fact, a thriving industry has grown around this perceived need to replace rather than restore.

A report from our Preservation Green Lab in Seattle, Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaluating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement, tackles this unfortunate perception head-on. The study examines multiple ways you can retrofit (read: modify) your historic windows for better performance, and outlines each option’s energy, carbon, and cost savings across a variety of climates.

The heartening result: Retrofits for historic windows perform comparably to new replacement windows, and almost every retrofit option offers a better return on investment (at a fraction of the cost).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Why More People Should Know About Tacoma, Washington (And Not Just from 10 Things I Hate About You)

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Sara Stiltner, Senior Project Manager, Preservation Green Lab

Credit: Sara Stiltner/National Trust for Historic Preservation
Old City Hall, which was built 1882, was the first building to be added to the Tacoma Register of Historic Places. 

Thanks to Tacoma’s Old City Hall, I finally got someone to laugh at my favorite joke, the only joke I’ve bothered to memorize.

The first time my husband Ryan visited Tacoma, Wash., we meandered through my hometown’s historic district. I showed off my favorite spots, rattling off both the histories and my memories of various buildings. Inspiration struck when we passed Old City Hall’s clock tower.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

In The Death and Life of Great American Cities, written in 1961, Jane Jacobs observed, “Cities need old buildings so badly it is probably impossible for vigorous streets and districts to grow without them.”

Older, Smaller, Better: Measuring How the Character of Buildings and Blocks Influences Urban Vitality, a new report from Preservation Green Lab, validates Jacobs' long-respected, but largely untested hypothesis -- that neighborhoods containing a mix of older, smaller buildings of different ages support greater levels of positive economic and social activity than areas dominated by newer, larger buildings.

The three study cities -- San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. -- all have extensive older building stock and strong real estate markets. In this toolkit, we share the highlights from the research as well as the steps your community can take to realize similar benefits. (See the full report and methodology here.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.