General

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: September 17th, 2007 by Walter Gallas

 

New Orleans WindowsI visited the warehouse operated by our partner the Preservation Resource Center this week to see what kinds of materials are coming in from the selective salvage of buildings which the city had declared an imminent structural threat and slated for demolition. These were buildings which, according to FEMA’s historic preservation staff and the State Historic Preservation Office, still retained features making them contributing buildings in a National Register district.

Materials from a total of 53 houses have been salvaged through Friday, with the contractor telling the PRC warehouse manager that they will begin on another group next week. The materials include numerous mantels, complete windows with casings, decorative brackets, interior doors, front doors, wooden screen doors, French doors, shutters, and some interior and exterior light fixtures. This is already becoming a source for the PRC’s and the Trust’s Home Again projects. We fought long and hard to get FEMA and the Army Corps of Engineers (which is in charge of demolition and debris removal through the end of this month) to come up with a plan to at least save some elements of these structures, which otherwise would have been completely lost.

Walter Gallas is director of the New Orleans Field Office.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

A Replacement Tomb?

Posted on: September 13th, 2007 by Sarah Heffern 3 Comments

 

What happens to memorials of national significance when their marble starts to crack? In the cases of monuments like the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, any cracks are repaired by re-grouting. But instead of going down this well-known preservation road, officials at Arlington National Cemetery want to replace the authentic Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with a replica -- in spite of the fact that experts say the replacement stone is likely to crack in the same way.

Here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, we naturally favor fixing the tomb rather than constructing a new one. Click here to learn more and to find out how to contact the superintendent of the cemetery to share your views.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

Volunteer Opportunity in New Orleans

Posted on: September 13th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 6 Comments

 

Two years after Hurricane Katrina, the need for volunteer help in New Orleans remains strong, and one of our local partners, Rebuilding Together, is seeking assistance to rebuild houses for low-income elderly and disabled residents.

Volunteers may be performing tasks such as painting, scraping, landscaping, dry-walling, taping, cleaning, installing appliances, and tiling. Instruction is given for unfamiliar tasks, and no volunteers are expected to do any job they are uncomfortable performing. All work is supervised by skilled Rebuilding Together staff members and water, refreshments and first aid kits are always onsite.

All volunteers must be 18 or older. Click here to see a schedule, which includes dates and participation costs. If you are able to help out, please contact Sean Vissar by email at svissar [at] prcno [dot] org or by phone at (504) 636-3076. Click here for information for low-cost volunteer accommodations.

Updated to add the schedule link.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

The "American Idol" of Preservation

Posted on: September 12th, 2007 by Sarah Heffern

 

Last week, the Trust and American Express announced the 25 Chicagoland sites that will be competing to win a million dollars in preservation funding though the Partners in Preservation program. While the sites participating in the contest were determined by grant applications, the winner -- or winners -- will be determined by public voting. (If it works for pop singers, it can work for historic buildings, right?)

Not sure which site gets your vote? If you're in the Chicago area, there's a special Partners in Preservation open house this weekend (September 15-16), where staff and volunteers will be available to talk about the sites and their preservation needs. And if you're not, the information is, of course, on the web.

Voting is open until October 10, and anyone who has registered online can vote daily for their favorite site. Winners will be announced in November.

And many thanks to Chicagoist, for covering the competition!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

 

Several months ago, the National Park Service received two reports recommending changes to the historic tax credit program. In response to these requests, the National Park System Advisory Board (NPSAB) worked with stakeholders to develop a recommendations report. The National Park Service has prepared a draft response to the recommendations of the NPSAB Committee.

Don’t miss your chance to comment on the National Park Service’s response to recommendations for changes -- this is your opportunity to help improve the program. Recommendations for change are focused in the following areas:

· Interpretation of the Secretary’s Standards

· Education, training, written and web based guidance

· Large multiple building complexes 

Time is running out – the review period for the documents ends on Friday September 14th. Take a moment to glance through the documents below, and provide the NPS with your feedback. Comments should be sent to NPS_HRTC_comments@nps.gov.

1. Interpretation of the Standards
Windows 
Interior Treatments
New Additions and New Construction
Modern Day Requirements and New Technology

2. Education, Training, Written
and Web-based Guidance

3. Very Large Multiple-Building Complexes

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.