Conferences

Spokane by Candlelight

Posted on: November 14th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 


The Leuthold House, built in 1925. (Photo courtesy Sarah M. Heffern)

If there's one thing I have learned over the years, it's that I am not alone when I say I like having a chance to peek into other people's homes. Not in the creepy, hiding-in-the-bushes sort of way, of course, but in the much more socially acceptable manner of dropping in at open houses and taking home tours.

I think this impulse to look behind closed doors is what makes the Candlelight House Tour at the National Preservation Conference a success year after year -- and never more so  than in Spokane a couple of weeks back, when preservationists and city residents alike wandered through homes in the ritzy Cliff Park neighborhood.

Cliff Park  -- according to the brochure we received -- dates back to the early 20th century, and features custom-built homes that rejected "tall, linear Queen Anne designs in favor of European-inspired Tudors, French and Spanish eclectics as well as American Colonials, Story Book, and Craftsman styles..." and "even a few homes... that represent mid-20th century modernism."


A family heirloom dress on display at the Richard & Jessie Nuzum House. (Photo courtesy Sarah M. Heffern)

Each of the homes I visited on the tour had its own unique appeal, but I'll admit I was most charmed by the Senator Dill Mansion, known as Cliff Aerie. "Charm" and "mansion" rarely go together as far as houses are concerned (charming is Realtor code for "really, really tiny" in my experience) but for all its imposing size, Cliff Aerie was laid out in such a way that all of the spaces seemed intimate and cozy, rather than impossibly grand. The views it commands, however -- including one from an observation tower used in World War II -- are as grand as can be.


Cliff Aerie - the Senator Dill Mansion - sports panoramic views of the city of Spokane. (Photo courtesy Sarah M. Heffern)

Though no other home on the tour could match the views at Cliff Aerie, and though the homes represented a wide range of architectural styles, they all did share one thing in common -- amazing stewardship. It was readily apparent that each house was beloved and well-preserved by its owners, who all seemed to take great pride in sharing their work with conference attendees and their fellow Spokanites alike.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Preservation Round-Up: Preservationists Take Spokane Edition

Posted on: November 9th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 


Spokane's clock tower, river, and brilliant fall foliage -- as seen from the Conference Center.

Beyond Boundaries in Beautiful Spokane -- Preservation Maryland

"This year’s conference highlighted the diverse cultural heritage of Spokane with a number of sessions and field trips devoted to the historic Native American presence and immigrant influence in the region. Preservation of structures, sites, landscapes and cultural resources were given attention and discussion. The sessions definitely reached beyond the usual boundaries of the preservationists’ comfort zone."

#PresConf Recap: Three Take Away Ideas -- Raina Regan

"It’s obvious, at least to me, that we’re at the cusp of major changes in the preservation field. On Wednesday night, National Trust president Stephanie Meeks discussed four “ingredients” that all major movements must have (based on Eric Hoffer’s work); a movement must be soul stirring, spectacular, communal, and an undertaking."

See also: #PresConf Recap: A Timeline // Storify

#presconf: Historic Building Assessment & Opening -- Adventures in Heritage

"Since I was in the systems group I got to go all over the building, from the roof to the basement. The building was AMAZING. From its view of the Spokane Falls, to its original fan system, to the elaborate blue room, every inch was stunning."

See also: Recaps for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

A Call to Action for 2016: Stephanie Meeks Addresses the 2012 National Preservation Conference -- Preservation Leadership Forum Blog

"It’s the same sort of emotional connection that drives people to action in all great causes, whether it be the crusade against breast cancer, homelessness or drunk driving.

Yet, while most of us would agree that saving historic places is as worthy a cause as those endeavors, I doubt many of us would argue that we have penetrated the national consciousness as deeply.

What those causes have -- and what we still need to build -- is the visibility and cohesion that turns a POPULAR CAUSE into a national MOVEMENT."

See also: The "National Preservation Conference" category for daily recaps and Storify slideshows.

Preserving State's Heritage: Why Spokane is Central -- Crosscut Seattle

"Attendees, more than 1,600 of them, had the opportunity to go on tours of Spokane's wonderful Craftsman neighborhoods and taste its mid-century modern moods (who doesn't enjoy the anachronistic wonder of the downtown concrete Parcade?). They also had the opportunity to go on tours farther afield to see Palouse barns, Hanford's B Reactor, even Grand Coulee dam, which was surely eye-opening for those who might regard Eastern Washington as little more than wheat fields and "Coug Mom" license plates; a not untypical Seattle view."

Downtown’s Past Draws Preservation Conference -- The Spokesman Review

"For the past 30 years, Spokane has put a big hug around its historic assets through restorations of the Davenport Hotel, Montvale Hotel, Lusso Hotel, Fox Theater, Bing Crosby Theater and Steam Plant Square -- to name a handful."

See also: Editorial: Spokane’s historical abundance spans city

Did you attend the National Preservation Conference in Spokane? Share your thoughts below -- and don't forget to fill out your session evaluations online!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

[GALLERY] Spokane in Pictures: @PresNation Edition

Posted on: November 7th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

Last week, members of the preservation community from across the nation converged on Spokane, Washington for the 2012 National Preservation Conference. From signs in storefronts telling preservation stories to our name in lights on theater marquees, the city pulled out all the stops to show us some love.

And I think I speak for most everyone when I say that the feeling was mutual. During the conference, you could hardly take a step in Spokane without seeing a preservationist shutterbug snapping photos left and right of their new favorite places.

So we thought we'd bring a few of those cool places to you with a quick gallery from the @PresNation Instagram account. (Follow us!) We'll showcase some of the other photographers in coming weeks, but we figured we'd whet your appetite in the meantime ... enjoy!


Did you take photos in Spokane during the National Preservation Conference? Share them in our Flickr group!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Tonight: National Preservation Conference Kicks Off in Spokane!

Posted on: October 31st, 2012 by Priya Chhaya

 

This post is adapted from the Preservation Leadership Forum blog. Follow along there for daily recaps of all conference activities!

Happy Halloween! Most of the staff today has embraced the holiday and turned out in shades of red, orange and black. But there is an even bigger event going on today -- the kick-off of the National Preservation Conference in Spokane!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

Counting Down to the National Preservation Conference in Spokane

Posted on: October 19th, 2012 by Priya Chhaya

 


Landmark from the 1974 World's Fair in Spokane.

Let’s sit down for a moment and take a breather. It’s always at this moment -- just over a week from the National Preservation Conference -- that the National Trust staff starts walking and talking over a hundred miles a minute as we finish up final preparations. But I always like to take a moment to remind myself about the place we are going.

This year it's Spokane, Washington. When someone thinks of visiting the State of Washington, Seattle always seems to be first on everyone’s mind. But no more. Spokane is a city that boasts 17 different historic districts and a variety of arts and culture venues, and I’m looking forward to experiencing as much as possible.

Take Riverfront Park, for example. In 1974 this was the home of Exposition ’74, the “World’s Fair.” Prior to its arrival this area of the city was covered by rail yards. But the city took the Expo’s arrival as an opportunity to clean up its brownfields and create what is now known as Riverfront Park -- home to a variety of attractions, including a Skyride over Spokane Falls which lie at the heart of the city.

As luck would have it, we are arriving during the short period when all of the attractions are open at once, providing an opportunity to fully recognize this great remediation and preservation project.

On top of experiencing the best that this city has to offer, I’m looking forward to my train ride into Spokane aboard the Empire Builder line (more on that when I return), and my stay at the beautiful historic Davenport Hotel. So while we may be a little harried counting down to sessions, tours, and events, we are also counting down to some great days of networking, learning about great preservation work, and exploring an impressive city.

P.S. If you’re going to be in Spokane with us, be sure to stop by the Preservation Leadership Forum booth to satisfy your sweet tooth.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.