Revitalization

It Takes a Village: How Boise, Idaho is Celebrating its Sesquicentennial

Posted on: September 23rd, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more -- it was a great party!
The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more.

This year, Boise, the capital city of Idaho, celebrates its 150th anniversary. Explorers and missionaries began arriving in the Boise River's fertile valley in the early 1800s. The U.S. military established Fort Boise on July 4, 1863. By 1867, the town consisted of 140 blocks and its population almost tripled between 1900 and 1910.

Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, Boise grew in population, economy, and culture. Hewlett-Packard and Micron Technology led the city in technological advancements, while the environment -- the Boise Foothills, River, and surrounding desert -- enjoys preservation. Today, Boise’s creative energy and artistic entrepreneurship continues to move the city forward.

The Boise City Department of Arts & History led the effort to commemorate Boise’s 150th anniversary -- or sesquicentennial -- in 2013, which evolved into a wide-scale initiative: BOISE 150. With support from the mayor and city council members, a small but passionate crew comprised of city staff, contractors, volunteers, and grantees developed an array of programs to celebrate Boise’s past, present, and collective future.

Want to see how the whole city is in on the act? Check out the BOISE 150 slideshow after the jump.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Endangered Species: Chicago's Animal Court Playground Looks to Rebound

Posted on: September 3rd, 2013 by David Robert Weible 4 Comments

 

The concrete sculptures were designed for children to climb and play on. The largest of the Animal Court sculptures consists of a bison, and what appears to be a mountain lion and her cub. Credit: National Public Housing Museum, Chicago, IL.
The concrete sculptures were designed for children to climb and play on. The largest of the Animal Court sculptures consists of a bison, and what appears to be a mountain lion and her cub.

For decades, the concrete statues of the Animal Court Playground on Chicago’s near west side stood as icons of the local landscape. And though they were removed in the early 2000s as part of a massive development overhaul by the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA), a new project is hoping to bring them back home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Independence, Texas, was founded in 1835, and was the original site of Baylor University. Credit: The Texas Collection, Baylor University
Independence, Texas, was founded in 1835, and was the original site of Baylor University.

For the past 40 years, David and Mary Wolff have spent long weekends leaving their home in Houston, Texas, and driving 83 miles northwest, crossing the Brazos River and watching as hay bales replace skyscrapers, until they pulled into the driveway of their ranch home in Independence, Texas.

An unincorporated village in Texas’ Washington County, Independence was founded in 1835 and 10 years later was the chosen site of Baylor University. Sam Houston once called Independence home, as did a number of European immigrants, and during the 1850s, the village was the wealthiest community in the state.

But after the Civil War, Independence’s economy changed. The railroad bypassed the town, and Baylor relocated to Waco. The farmland remained active, though, and the town carried on.

When the Wolffs bought their Independence ranch in 1973, they didn’t know much about the village, beyond its unparalleled natural beauty.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Marcus Books: Oldest African-American Bookstore Fights to Stay Open

Posted on: August 13th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita 6 Comments

 

Marcus Bookstores has a second branch in Oakland, California. The bookstores are named after Marcus Garvey, author of Philosophy and Opinions. Credit: Steve Rhodes, Flickr.
Marcus Books: San Franciscans hope landmark designation and city resolution will save the oldest African-American-owned bookstore in the country.

“The African-American experience has always been told,” says Reverend Arnold Townsend, vice president of the NAACP San Francisco chapter. “In the bookstore, it never dies because it’s in print.”

Marcus Books opened in 1960 in San Francisco’s historically black Fillmore district. Now, the country’s oldest African-American-owned bookstore is at risk of closure.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

The House that Radio Built: NPR's New Headquarters Celebrates Preservation

Posted on: June 18th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

NPR’s new headquarters building, where old effortlessly meets shiny and new.
NPR’s new headquarters building, where old effortlessly meets shiny and new.

For most people, moving means cardboard boxes, heavy lifting, and forgetting where you packed your underwear. However, for National Public Radio, a recent relocation meant making something old new again.

NPR’s shiny new headquarters is built atop the National Register-listed Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company Warehouse. As an anchor in an emerging neighborhood, the organization is a terrific example of how preservation supports the future.

National Trust correspondents Jason Clement and Julia Rocchi had the chance to tour the building. Here’s what they thought -- to quote NPR’s “founding mother” Susan Stamberg -- of “the house that radio built.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.