Revitalization

 

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The exterior of the rehabilitated Firestone Building.

Last year, the rehabilitation of the 1920s Firestone building in Gainesville, Florida was completed. Phoebe Cade Miles (the daughter of Gatorade inventor Dr. James Cade) and her husband, Richard Miles, of the Cade Museum, sponsored the project and worked with father/son team Richard and Ryland Wagner of Joyner Construction to complete the rehabilitation. The project was so well done that the Wagners were recognized by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation with an Honorable Mention for Adaptive Reuse award.

Recently, we sat down with Phoebe and Richard to talk about the Firestone rehabilitation project.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Travel Itinerary] Lowell, Massachusetts

Posted on: July 2nd, 2015 by David Weible

 

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Trolley tours through Lowell National Historical Park are free of charge.

One of Lowell, Massachusetts’ defining qualities -- beyond being a hard-working, blue-collar town -- is change.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Celebrate 50 Years of Preservation In Denver’s Larimer Square

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.
Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.

Not every major city can point to the exact spot where it began, but Denver can.

That spot is Larimer Square, where settler and developer William Larimer and his son first built a 16-by-20-foot log cabin in 1858. After aggressively selling tracts of land to miners and other migrants to the Rocky Mountains, Larimer eventually saw the city of Denver incorporate in 1860.

Although the original cabin was torn down in 1861, the square still stands today as a testament to its namesake’s tenacity and pioneer spirit. There was a time in the 1960s, however, when the future of Larimer Square was threatened by Denver's Urban Renewal Authority, which was attempting to "modernize" the city's skyline. In 1963, preservationist and developer Dana Crawford stepped in to form the Larimer Square Association, eventually succeeding in saving the block-long row of buildings from demolition in 1965 and ensuring their survival into the 21st century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Heritage Tourism

Posted on: June 17th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 


This video shares the highlights of the 2013 Zora Neale Hurston festival in historic Eatonville, Florida, an example of heritage tourism in action.

Heritage Tourism has been known to help economically revitalize struggling historic communities. But what exactly does it entail? The Georgia Department of Natural Resources: Historic Preservation Division Consultants Directory says:

Heritage Tourism, noun

The National Trust for Historic Preservation defines heritage tourism as traveling to experience the places, artifacts, and activities that authentically represent the stories and people of the past and present. It includes visitation to cultural, historic, and natural resources. Research and planning for Heritage Tourism would include identifying local or regional points of interest, developing or organizing those points of interest for visitation, and developing promotional and informational materials and guides for distribution to travelers and tourists through tourism bureaus, chambers of commerce, and by other marketing methods.

The video at the top of the post showcases the Zora Neale Hurston Festival, a successful endeavor by the historic town of Eatonville, Florida, to use their connection to author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston to encourage heritage tourism and support their town.

Word in Use: "Heritage tourism brings in outside dollars providing employment across [Nevada]. Millions of dollars annually are spent at parks, museums, hotels, restaurants, stores and casinos by visitors to our historic and scenic sites…These are example of Nevada’s special places where heritage resources deserve our patronage and protection." -- Greg Seymour, "Legislature Protects Nevada Heritage"

Though an important component of heritage tourism is bringing in revenue for your historic neighborhood, another significant aspect is that it raises awareness for and celebrates the distinct culture of your community. For more information about heritage tourism, check out the National Trust’s five guiding principles for successful and sustainable heritage tourism development as well as four steps for getting started.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Celebrating National Library Week 2015, Preservation-Style

Posted on: April 13th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

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National Library Week is April 12-18, 2015.

In honor of National Library Week (which runs from April 12-18 and is sponsored by the American Library Association), the National Trust is using a preservation perspective to spotlight three historic buildings that have been repurposed into a bookworm’s paradise. These three libraries are an excellent example of National Library Week 2015's theme: "unlimited possibilities." So, prepare yourselves, bibliophiles, for an impromptu road trip!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Introducing the 2015 Great American Main Street Awards Winners

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 10 Comments

 

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Downtown Cape Girardeau served as a finish line for part of the 2013 Great Race. The town’s welcome party for the racers earned it the Great Race's Hospitality award for 2013.

Today, the National Main Street Center is excited to announce the 2015 Great American Main Street Awards® (GAMSA) winners. The GAMSA is the nation’s premier accolade for downtown revitalization achievement, where recipients are recognized for their achievement in utilizing the National Main Street Center’s Four-Point Approach and collaborating with the public and private sector to make their Main Streets an exciting place to live, work and play. The GAMSA winners were announced today at the 2015 National Main Streets Conference in Atlanta, Georgia.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.