Civic

Denver's Emerson School Building Reopens After Green Restoration

Posted on: May 30th, 2012 by Jim Lindberg

 

The flag of the National Trust is flying high over the historic Emerson School in Denver, Colorado! National Trust President Stephanie Meeks and Chief Preservation Officer David Brown returned to their 5th grade “flag patrol” days to hoist the National Trust's banner as part of last week’s grand opening festivities, which also included a ribbon-cutting ceremony and an open house attended by more than 250 guests.


National Trust President Stephanie Meeks and Chief Preservation Officer David Brown preparing to raise the flags.

These events marked the completion of a $3.2 million “green rehabilitation” of the Emerson School. Donated to the National Trust in 2010, this 1885 schoolhouse is now home to the Trust’s Denver Field Office, as well as seven other nonprofit organizations, including Historic Denver, Colorado Preservation, and Downtown Colorado.

When we launched the Emerson School project last August, part of our plan was to demonstrate replicable approaches for making older buildings more energy efficient and sustainable. With the project now complete, we can point to four basic, adaptable strategies used at the Emerson School that we believe can apply to similar building retrofit projects. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Incredible Panoramas of Abandoned Places

Posted on: April 19th, 2012 by David Garber 10 Comments

 

Photographer Matthew Christopher has been documenting old, abandoned, and endangered buildings for the past eight years on his website, Abandoned America, in an effort to create a living memory of places that might not survive otherwise.

But he doesn't take only conventional photos. Matthew also creates stunning 360-degree panoramas, effectively placing the viewer inside the buildings themselves. Check them out for yourself by clicking and dragging on the images below to explore the rooms.

The Richmond Generating Station - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

From Abandoned America: "Built in 1915 and opened in 1925, the Richmond Generating Station in Philadelphia is a neoclassical cathedral to the might of industry. The vaulted, crumbling roof of the main turbine hall soars 130 feet over what were once the largest turbines in the world. This coal burning power plant has festered in its own corrosive chemical stew since 1985, the year it was abandoned. Nonetheless, it is perhaps the most amazing and awe-inspiring building i have ever seen." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

Friends of the High Line and the City of New York, co-creators of the now-famous park on a reused elevated railroad through the west side of Manhattan, unveiled their plans for the third phase of the landmark preservation project at a public meeting last night. Check out the slideshow below for images of how the newly-restored and reimagined section will look:

This phase addresses the rail yards portion of the project at the northern terminus of the High Line, where more than 12 million square feet of new office, residential, retail, and cultural uses are planned for the site as part of the Hudson Yards development above the rail yards.

Construction of the High Line will be closely coordinated with the development of Hudson Yards, with the park fully built out on the majority of the eastern section of the historic railway, and an interim walkway built over the western section. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Saving Schools in Shrinking Cities

Posted on: March 8th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Written by Brenna Moloney

Figuring out what to do with empty school buildings is a major preservation conundrum in shrinking cities. The issue isn't one of figuring out what to do with one or two obsolete old buildings once the school district decides to build a new high school somewhere else. The issue goes beyond that and can reach almost epidemic levels. This is true of the two cities I work in for the National Trust and the Michigan Historic Preservation Network.

In Saginaw, Michigan, there are about 11 vacant public schools and many more vacant private school buildings. In Lansing, Michigan, the school board is currently debating which of the city’s two major high schools, Eastern or Sexton, is to be closed. With crushing budget constraints, a burgeoning private charter school market, and shrinking populations, these cities can no longer afford the level of educational infrastructure that they currently have and are looking to rightsize.


Lansing's Art Moderne-style Sexton High School. (Photo: redmudball on Flickr)

In addition, many of these buildings are architectural gems. Built in the early 1940s, Sexton High School is an Art Moderne building with curved yellow brick walls and stunning craft tile details on the interior. Opened in the city center in 1928, Lansing's Collegiate Gothic-style Eastern High School sports a copper cupola and gutters, carved arch windows and a slate roof. Additionally, they are both irreplaceable neighborhood anchors and once one of them goes, there is no telling what the future of the neighborhood may hold.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Historic Properties for Sale: $1 School Edition

Posted on: January 6th, 2012 by David Garber 3 Comments

 

Old Lincoln School - Rock Island, Illinois

This city-owned landmark was built in 1894 and is for sale to a qualified developer for redevelopment as mixed-use commercial or residential space. It was listed as one of the 10 most endangered properties in Illinois in 2005. Best part? Pricetag: $1.

Parker-Gray School - Alexandria, Virginia

Located just steps from Old Town Alexandria and the Braddock Road metro station, this 1944 structure needs some TLC to bring it back to its former glory. Originally constructed as a nursery school for African-American children during WWII, the building became the William Thomas American Legion Post #129, which continued to serve the local African-American community through the 20th century. Pricetag: $675,000.

Barnett Hospital and Nursing School - Huntington, West Virginia

The historic Barnett Hospital and Nursing School is a three story frame and brick veneer building is zoned for residential and/or commercial development. Parking is available on site. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009 and is eligible for West Virginia and Federal Historic Preservation Tax Credits. The building is the only known Black Hospital founded, owned, and administer by a single African-American, Dr. C. C. Barnett, still standing. Dr. Barnett was a first cousin of Carter G. Woodson, the Father of Black History. Pricetag: $500,000.

David Garber is the blog editor at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.