Civic

Endangered Species: Chicago's Animal Court Playground Looks to Rebound

Posted on: September 3rd, 2013 by David Robert Weible 4 Comments

 

The concrete sculptures were designed for children to climb and play on. The largest of the Animal Court sculptures consists of a bison, and what appears to be a mountain lion and her cub. Credit: National Public Housing Museum, Chicago, IL.
The concrete sculptures were designed for children to climb and play on. The largest of the Animal Court sculptures consists of a bison, and what appears to be a mountain lion and her cub.

For decades, the concrete statues of the Animal Court Playground on Chicago’s near west side stood as icons of the local landscape. And though they were removed in the early 2000s as part of a massive development overhaul by the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA), a new project is hoping to bring them back home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Five Endangered Civil Rights Sites: Commemorating the March On Washington

Posted on: August 28th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

The March on Washington in 1963. Credit: American Jewish Historical Society.

Today, August 28, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the March On Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.'s historic "I Have a Dream" speech. In commemoration, last week we shared five preserved sites of the Civil Rights movement. Today -- on the March's actual anniversary -- we share five equally important sites that are currently endangered.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Historic Playgrounds: Seward Park, NYC

Posted on: August 22nd, 2013 by Paulina Tam

 

This week's installment on historic playgrounds comes to you from the Big Apple, where editorial intern Paulina Tam reports on Seward Park in New York City’s Lower East Side (more history after the jump!):

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

Five Saved Civil Rights Sites: Commemorating the March On Washington

Posted on: August 21st, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

The March on Washington. Credit: US Information Agency.

August 28, 2013 will mark the 50th anniversary of the March On Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The occasion is cause for reflection on the people and places that helped shape the civil rights movement.

Historic sites that represent the fight for equality in America are essential to telling the full story of this important chapter of our nation's history. To commemorate the moment, we present five sites that preserve the memory of the struggle for civil rights.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

How We Came to Play: The History of Playgrounds

Posted on: August 15th, 2013 by Guest Writer 3 Comments

 

By Kaitlin O’Shea, Preservation in Pink

Giant Stride ca. 1910-1915 as would be seen on a Model Playground. Credit: Library of Congress.
Giant Stride ca. 1910-1915 as would be seen on a Model Playground.

On warm spring evenings, blustery fall afternoons, and sticky summer days, when nostalgia and memories brush past you, where does your mind go? Where did you spend many hours as a school-age child? For most of us it was a playground, whether climbing the playground equipment or running circles on the athletic field, letting our imaginations take us anywhere and everywhere.

Yet this was not always the case. Children of the 19th century didn’t have formal playgrounds. Originating as “sand gardens” in Germany in 1885, the beginnings of playgrounds appeared in the United States in Boston in 1886. And until the turn of the 20th century, playgrounds remained uncommon in public spaces.

But as industrialization and urbanization grew, so did the concern for public welfare. Humanitarians saw playgrounds as the solution to cramped quarters, poor air quality, and social isolation. This new concept could keep children off the dangerous streets and help them develop their physical health, good habits, socialization skills, and the pleasure of being a child.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.