Civic

Putting a Stamp on History at the Bronx General Post Office

Posted on: March 26th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

140325_blog_photo_PostOffice_3_NewYorkLandmarksConservancy
The United States Postal Service first proposed shuttering the post office, along with 16 other Bronx post offices, in 2012.

Thirteen colorful New Deal-era murals line the walls inside the Bronx General Post Office on the borough’s Grand Concourse. They stretch all the way to the 20-foot ceiling, towering over everyone who walks through the doors. Rendered in egg tempura on plaster by artist Ben Shahn and his wife Bernarda Bryson Shahn, the paintings embody the might of American labor and industry.

But until recently, the murals’ future, as well as that of the grand historic lobby that they occupy, was in doubt.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

It Takes a Village: How Boise, Idaho is Celebrating its Sesquicentennial

Posted on: September 23rd, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more -- it was a great party!
The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more.

This year, Boise, the capital city of Idaho, celebrates its 150th anniversary. Explorers and missionaries began arriving in the Boise River's fertile valley in the early 1800s. The U.S. military established Fort Boise on July 4, 1863. By 1867, the town consisted of 140 blocks and its population almost tripled between 1900 and 1910.

Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, Boise grew in population, economy, and culture. Hewlett-Packard and Micron Technology led the city in technological advancements, while the environment -- the Boise Foothills, River, and surrounding desert -- enjoys preservation. Today, Boise’s creative energy and artistic entrepreneurship continues to move the city forward.

The Boise City Department of Arts & History led the effort to commemorate Boise’s 150th anniversary -- or sesquicentennial -- in 2013, which evolved into a wide-scale initiative: BOISE 150. With support from the mayor and city council members, a small but passionate crew comprised of city staff, contractors, volunteers, and grantees developed an array of programs to celebrate Boise’s past, present, and collective future.

Want to see how the whole city is in on the act? Check out the BOISE 150 slideshow after the jump.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

League Park: Ohio's Lost Ballpark Gets Back in the Game

Posted on: September 20th, 2013 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Jeremy Feador, University Archivist, Ritter Library, Baldwin Wallace University

Outside League Park in Cleveland, between 1900-1910. Credit: Library of Congress
Outside League Park in Cleveland, c. 1900-1910.

Nestled on the corner of East 66th and Lexington Ave are the remnants of Cleveland’s League Park. To say that this plot of grass, remaining ticket house, and partial wall of the park are historic is an understatement.

In 1891, when a 24-year-old Cy Young stepped on the mound for the inaugural game at League Park, he ushered in a period of baseball history that can hardly be rivaled. That day he helped lead the Cleveland Spiders to victory over Cincinnati, 12-3.

Eight years later in 1899, the team set a mark that may never be equaled in baseball history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Playing with Art: The Isamu Noguchi Playscape

Posted on: September 19th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita 5 Comments

 

The Isamu Noguchi Playscape: Is it a park? Is it sculpture? Let’s call it visionary playground design.
The Isamu Noguchi Playscape: Is it a park? Is it art? Let’s call it visionary playground design.

Don’t touch the art -- play with it! Kids can definitely get their hands and feet all over this sculpture installation. The Isamu Noguchi Playscape, a colorful world of reimagined play and art, is found in the Olmsted-designed Piedmont Park, Atlanta, Georgia.

At the Playscape, swings, slides, and jungle gyms are reconceptualized as sculpture. Likewise, sculpture is rethought for its communal function, blurring the line between fine art, landscape design, and good old childhood fun.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Not Stopping That United Sound: Highway Threatens Detroit's Motown Studio

Posted on: September 6th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita 1 Comment

 

The United Sound System Recording Studios’ and its long music history may be run over by a freeway. Credit: Brian Mulloy, Flickr.
The United Sound System Recording Studios and its long music history may be leveled or be forced to relocate to make way for the I-94.

United Sound System: it's where Detroit got its Motown sound. One of the first independent recording studios in the US, United Sound was where Berry Gordy Jr. first produced his Motown record and Aretha Franklin recorded the vocals to "Freeway of Love."

Ironically, today a freeway -- an expansion of the I-94 -- threatens the legendary music house.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.