Architecture

 


825 Washington in the Emily Kimbrough District.

In many ways, the picture of Muncie, Ind., is the picture of communities throughout the Rust Belt Midwest: a former boomtown chock full turn-of-the-century architecture largely neglected after suburban flight and the loss of manufacturing. But the sheer number of architecturally significant buildings, and the local university project to raise awareness for them, is what sets this city of roughly 70,000 apart.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

New Life for a Maryland Log Cabin

Posted on: December 3rd, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 3 Comments

 

Laurie Burch had originally intended to spruce up her 1878 log cabin outside of Hancock, MD, and rent it out to hikers before eventually deciding that it was just too far off the beaten path.

Thankfully, the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC), a nonprofit organization that partners with the National Park Service, the National Forest Service, and numerous state agencies and is responsible for maintaining and monitoring more than 1,200 miles of trails, more than 1,000 acres of land, and 85 cabins and shelters in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, knew just what to do with it.

“She reached out to the club and said, 'If you want it, come get it,'” says Tom Avey, a PATC member.

And that’s just what the group did.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Prentice Hospital Granted Temporary Reprieve

Posted on: November 29th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

While the effort to preserve Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago continues to garner national media attention -- including this segment that ran last weekend on National Public Radi0 -- the Trust continues to work with its partners in the Save Prentice Coalition on advocacy efforts to save Prentice from demolition.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Two weeks ago while in New Orleans, I found myself having a familiar moment at the corner of Tulane Avenue and South Tonti Street, the intersection where one of my favorite buildings in the world -- the old Dixie Brewery -- sits abandoned.

I've made a habit out of checking in on it every time I'm in town, and this visit played out much like my past pilgrimages.

After thumb-typing my way through some requisite Instagramming, Foursquaring, Facebooking, and tweeting, I took off my headphones and sat quietly on the curb, surveying Dixie's bruises and black eyes from my ant's eye view. Unlike the narrow streets of the French Quarter, where the Big Easy high steps by you with the garishness of a Zatarain's commercial, this section of the city can be very quiet -- eerily and somewhat mesmerizingly so.

After at least five minutes of undisturbed building gazing, I was rattled back to reality by the thunderous approach of the 39 bus. As I motioned to the driver that I wasn't actually waiting for a ride, I chuckled to myself about how weird the whole thing must have looked -- just me, the curb, a derelict building, and an empty plastic grocery bag scratching down the street.

After a bit more reflection, though, I think my New Orleans experience is no different than the feeling a lot of preservationists have and are often caught acting on: Sometimes, when you really love a place, you've just got to sit with it for a little bit. You know, take it all in.

It’s the same feeling I got -- or more accurately, that got me -- earlier this year when I walked into Miami Marine Stadium for the first time. Between the awe-inspiring roof (is it modern architecture or alien spacecraft?) and the sensation you get of literally floating on the water, this National Treasure is a wow place in every sense of the word. Just like in New Orleans, the only thing I could do was sit down and take it all in. And unlike Tulane Avenue, the stadium has seats.

Though it has been shuttered since 1992, Miami Marine Stadium is no stranger to folks like me who find themselves needing a moment to absorb what they see. On any given day, its basin is alive with rowers who drift by to marvel at all the interesting shapes, both of the building and the graffiti that covers it.

Photographers are another common sight. Some gain entrance illegally and snap shots when they think no one is looking. Others, like Jay Koenigsberg, ask for permission and get to spend some real quality time with the stadium. The proof is in the pictures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

The Statue of Liberty Shines Again

Posted on: November 16th, 2012 by Lauren Walser

 


Relighting the Statue of Liberty.

Last Friday, the lights at the Statue of Liberty were shining brightly for the first time since Superstorm Sandy slammed the East Coast.

The storm, which hit New York Harbor on Oct. 29, caused significant damage to Liberty Island, knocking out its heating, power, and emergency generators, as well as damaging its docks and grounds. The island is currently closed to the public.

In the days following the storm, construction crews worked around the clock to restore permanent power to the monument, providing temporary lighting to the torch and crown on the evening of Nov. 9 before fully restoring power two days later.

“It’s not often you see the Statue of Liberty without the torch lit,” says Paul Natoli, president and CEO of New Jersey-based Joseph A. Natoli Construction Corporation. “It’s important. It’s symbolic. So it was critical that we got that up and running again, as soon as possible.”

The storm hit just one day after the statue’s reopening on Oct. 28, the 126th anniversary of its dedication. The national monument closed in October 2011 for a yearlong, nearly $30 million renovation.

Much of the work took place inside the statue’s pedestal. New code-compliant stairs were built, and three new elevators were installed, including a lift to the observation deck, making that level wheelchair-accessible for the first time. Crews also upgraded the monument’s restrooms, fire alarm systems, and HVAC systems.

“This [renovation] was about making the monument more accessible, more safe, and more welcoming to visitors,” says Michael Mills, partner at Mills + Schnoering Architects, LLC, a firm specializing in preservation and architectural design.


New exterior staircase.

Superstorm Sandy has been one of many hurdles faced by the team of architects and contractors working on the monument. For one, all materials had to be transported to the island via barge.

“Normally on a construction site, your trucks can roll on and off site whenever you want them to,” Natoli says. “But not when you’re working on an island.”

Tight security on the island caused additional challenges, as all materials shipped to and from the island had to go through rigorous security checks by United States Park Police, and all crew members had to undergo thorough background checks before working on the site.

Working within a historic monument provided another layer of complications. Space inside the statue’s pedestal was extremely limited (it is 27 square feet at its widest point), and massive steel beams providing support to the statue crisscross through the space.

“We had to get an elevator and two 44-inch-wide fire stairs up through those beams without touching them,” Mills says.

Mills and his team used laser scanning and three-dimensional modeling to execute their design -- methods that were quicker and more time- and cost-effective than traditional ones.

“It really was like a three-dimensional puzzle,” Mills says.

As work to the statue and Liberty Island continues, the island will remain closed to the public until further notice, according to Mike Litterst, a National Park Service information officer, adding that the NPS is still completing emergency stabilization and assessments to determine the full extent of the damage.

Updates on the statue's status are available on the Statue of Liberty National Monument website.


Damaged support dock on Liberty Island.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.