Architecture

 

Part Two of our architectural style digest (read Part One here) offers definitions and examples of houses from approximately 1855 up to 1960.

When you’re looking at historic houses, it’s important to remember that many are not exactly a single kind of style. You’ll discover that some have used other materials or details not found in the technical definition, or alterations, additions, and updates have melded two different styles together.

These nuances and variations are what make each historic house special and oftentimes historically significant. So preserve them, celebrate them, and enjoy them!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

[Slideshow] Historic DC Church Gets a Mural Makeover

Posted on: April 12th, 2013 by Emily Potter 6 Comments

 

Alex Brewer, better known as HENSE, is an Atlanta, Ga.-based graffiti artist who took to Washington, D.C.’s city streets last year for a private commission to transform an abandoned, historic church into a work of art.

blog_photo_HENSE_studio
HENSE in his studio.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

 

Last week, we kicked off our series on buying a historic house with a toolkit focused on how to find the right new-to-you home, and this week, we’re moving on to the next step -- identifying the kinds of properties you might find.

Naturally, with the United States being as large as it is, there are a lot of architectural styles to cover. If you’re looking for a home built between approximately 1620 and 1890, today’s post is for you. Tune in next week for part two, which will get through the mid-20th century.

And because architecture, like preservation, comes with a lot of jargon, look for definitions and links throughout for more information.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

[Sitings] The Farnsworth House in Plano, Ill.

Posted on: March 30th, 2013 by Mame McCully 2 Comments

 

Mies van der Rohe's iconic Farnsworth House is located about an hour west of downtown Chicago in Plano, Illinois. Conceived in 1945 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the home was completed in 1951.
Conceived in 1945 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the home was completed in 1951.

Plano, Illinois is a small town about an hour from Chicago, but what many don’t know is that it’s home to The Farnsworth House, an internationally known piece of architecture by famous architect Mies van der Rohe. Sitting alongside the Fox River, the glass-walled home is truly an experience for architecture and design lovers.

If you are in Chicago, don’t miss this gem and the chance to sneak away from the Windy City to see what else Illinois has to offer. Tours begin April 3; visitors are encouraged to get their tickets online in advance.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Book Review] Farmhouse Revival and the Rural Aesthetic

Posted on: March 29th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 5 Comments

 

Farmhouse Revival cover. Credit: Steve Gross and Susan Daley, Farmhouse Revival, Abrams © 2013

Few things are more identifiable to the American soul than the farmhouse. At a time when more Americans are living in cities than ever before -- and possibly because of that -- the aesthetic beauty and the overall concept of the American farmhouse still resonates deeply within the nation’s consciousness.

With Farmhouse Revival, authors and photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daley tap into our connection with these places, highlighting 20 restored farmsteads from Saddlebow Farm in Vermont’s Green Mountains, to Sylvester Manor on New York’s Shelter Island (which will be featured in our upcoming Spring issue of Preservation).

No two houses are alike. With no set rules on what constitutes a farmhouse beyond its location and purpose, these abodes run the gamut of architectural styles from Georgian manors to Colonial homesteads (sometimes within a single structure) while their interiors range from the most basic and cozy to the near-luxurious. Beyond keeping things interesting, the variety demonstrates that these farmhouses -- seldom designed by architects -- reflect not only the time period in which they were built, but also the community that surrounded them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.