Architecture

 

Last week, we kicked off our series on buying a historic house with a toolkit focused on how to find the right new-to-you home, and this week, we’re moving on to the next step -- identifying the kinds of properties you might find.

Naturally, with the United States being as large as it is, there are a lot of architectural styles to cover. If you’re looking for a home built between approximately 1620 and 1890, today’s post is for you. Tune in next week for part two, which will get through the mid-20th century.

And because architecture, like preservation, comes with a lot of jargon, look for definitions and links throughout for more information.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

[Sitings] The Farnsworth House in Plano, Ill.

Posted on: March 30th, 2013 by Mame McCully 2 Comments

 

Mies van der Rohe's iconic Farnsworth House is located about an hour west of downtown Chicago in Plano, Illinois. Conceived in 1945 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the home was completed in 1951.
Conceived in 1945 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth, the home was completed in 1951.

Plano, Illinois is a small town about an hour from Chicago, but what many don’t know is that it’s home to The Farnsworth House, an internationally known piece of architecture by famous architect Mies van der Rohe. Sitting alongside the Fox River, the glass-walled home is truly an experience for architecture and design lovers.

If you are in Chicago, don’t miss this gem and the chance to sneak away from the Windy City to see what else Illinois has to offer. Tours begin April 3; visitors are encouraged to get their tickets online in advance.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Book Review] Farmhouse Revival and the Rural Aesthetic

Posted on: March 29th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 5 Comments

 

Farmhouse Revival cover. Credit: Steve Gross and Susan Daley, Farmhouse Revival, Abrams © 2013

Few things are more identifiable to the American soul than the farmhouse. At a time when more Americans are living in cities than ever before -- and possibly because of that -- the aesthetic beauty and the overall concept of the American farmhouse still resonates deeply within the nation’s consciousness.

With Farmhouse Revival, authors and photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daley tap into our connection with these places, highlighting 20 restored farmsteads from Saddlebow Farm in Vermont’s Green Mountains, to Sylvester Manor on New York’s Shelter Island (which will be featured in our upcoming Spring issue of Preservation).

No two houses are alike. With no set rules on what constitutes a farmhouse beyond its location and purpose, these abodes run the gamut of architectural styles from Georgian manors to Colonial homesteads (sometimes within a single structure) while their interiors range from the most basic and cozy to the near-luxurious. Beyond keeping things interesting, the variety demonstrates that these farmhouses -- seldom designed by architects -- reflect not only the time period in which they were built, but also the community that surrounded them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Slideshow] Exploring "Iconic" Places with Photographer Brian Vanden Brink

Posted on: March 29th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

ICONIC Book Jacket/Cover, 2012.

Brian Vanden Brink has been photographing unforgettable historic places since the 1970s, when he moved to the coast of Maine and began shooting for architects and magazines. Since then, he has cemented a reputation as one of the nation’s foremost architectural photographers.

“The images in Iconic, my sixth book, cover more than 35 years of this work -- my whole photographic life,” he says. “It’s almost like a personal travel journal documenting experiences with buildings I feel are important ... Whether it’s because of the way these structures sit in the landscape -- or what they represent culturally or socially -- I felt they had to be brought together for readers to see and appreciate.”

James H. Schwartz, the National Trust’s vice president for editorial and creative strategy, recently spoke with Brian to learn more about his work and inspirations.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

The wood shakes on the house were deteriorating by the time Fenton purchased the property. He consulted with architects, fellow historic homeowners, and manufacturers of products designed for historic buildings in order to learn how to best repair them. He eventually stripped and re-stained each shake by hand.

It is said to be the largest Craftsman residence ever built, and now, after an extensive 25-year restoration, the three-story house in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles known as Artemesia is celebrating its centennial.

Built in 1913, Artemesia was designed by architect Frank A. Brown for the family of engineer Frederick E. Engstrum, whose father founded a major Southern California construction company.

After passing through the hands of several owners, the house sat largely neglected since the early 1940s, until advertising executive Leonard Fenton purchased the house in 1987 at the tender age of 23.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.