Architecture

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Restoration

Posted on: July 1st, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The mansion at James Madison's Montpelier was restored between 2003 and 2008.

"Restoration" is a term frequently used in the preservation industry, but what exactly does it mean? Is it interchangeable with preservation? Is it similar? Or does it mean something totally different?

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards’ Four Approaches to the Treatment of Historic Properties defines it as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Une Belle Maison: The Lombard Plantation House

Posted on: June 30th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

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Left: S. Frederick Starr in front of the fully-reconstructed kitchen house on his Lombard Plantation property. He was able to rebuild the kitchen house from scratch using 19th-century notarial drawings. Right: When Starr initially purchased the Lombard Plantation house, a cement-block biker bar called Sarge’s sat in the front yard. 

We’re excited to feature the story of the Lombard Plantation house -- one of the last 19th-century plantation houses still in existence inside New Orleans’ city limits -- in the 2015 Summer issue of Preservation magazine. We couldn’t fit all of the wonderful photos of the house inside our six-page spread, so to make sure they didn’t go to waste, we’re featuring a selection of outtakes by photographer Sara Essex Bradley here.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Bousillage

Posted on: June 24th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Roque House, built circa 1797, has bousillage walls on its exterior.

If you’ve ever visited a historic house in Louisiana -- particularly modest mansions, small outbuildings, or cottages of the French Colonial period -- you may have noticed mud walls on the interior or exterior of the building. This idiosyncratic feature is made with a building material called bousillage.

The Trust for Architectural Easements’ Glossary of Architectural Terms defines it as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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The Julia Morgan-designed Chinese YWCA of San Francisco was built in 1932 and now houses the Chinese Historical Society.

Though many people know Julia Morgan as the architect of iconic Hearst Castle, she also designed buildings on more modest budgets. One of her best is the Chinese YWCA (1932) in San Francisco, now the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

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The Frederick R. Buell residence

Frederick R. Buell Residence Seeks Elmer Grey Fan with Laidback Taste

2726 E. Kenwood Blvd. -- Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Take a look at me. I mean a really good look. For you Elmer Grey fans, do you see anything familiar? I hope so, because I’m the renowned architect’s first solo commission. Though I’m not as well known as the Pasadena Playhouse or as famous as the Beverly Hills Hotel (two of Grey’s most celebrated works), I hold the essence of Grey’s early genius.

All of his fine detail and unparalleled style is revealed when you open any of my many windows. The sunlight rushes in and illuminates the intricate woodwork throughout my hallways, bedrooms, kitchen, and especially around my two fireplaces in the parlor and front room.

Having the bragging rights of living in an Elmer Grey original is great, but I think it’s the little modern upgrades that make living in me especially worthwhile. Six spacious bedrooms (including an in-law suite with a kitchenette), a lower-level theater and game room, and a private yard with a patio and porch swing await you, ready to make your evenings laidback and leisurely.

Want to relax here? Check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Roadside Rest Shelters

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

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This rest area stands against the desert backdrop near Abiquiu, New Mexico.

Think back to your last road trip. Where did you stop for a bite to eat? What scenery did you study when you paused to stretch your legs?

Before options like drive-thrus and commercial travel centers made road travel a little more convenient, small roadside rest areas, many of which were built as part of the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, were a driver’s only option.

On a drive from Los Angeles to Austin, Texas, in 2007, photographer Ryann Ford took notice of these rest shelters. “As a photographer, it’s hard not to notice them,” she says. “They’re perfect minimalist structures set on a perfect landscape. And they’re each different in their own way.”

For the last six years, Ford has traveled the country documenting rest shelters along highways and in state and national parks.

“I think they tell the story of a different time,” she says. “Now, we’re so rushed with our travel. We just want to get from point A to point B really quickly, whether it’s by plane or jumping on the fastest highway and getting there as fast as possible. If you eat, it’s through a drive-thru. [These rest shelters] tell the story of a different era in travel, when it was about the journey.”

You can explore Ford’s full collection of photographs in her book, The Last Stop: Vanishing Relics of the American Roadside, due out from powerHouse Books next spring. Until then, you can see a sampling of her photos in the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation.

We’ve also shared a few more of her images here. And we’d love to hear from you. Share your memories of roadside rest areas below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.