Architecture

[Retro Roadmap] The Haines Shoe House in Hallam, Pa.

Posted on: April 23rd, 2014 by Beth Lennon 2 Comments

 


Prior to the creation of Route 30, the Shoe House was surrounded on all sides by farmland.

You’re driving along Route 30 where the road opens up into a highway halfway between the hustle and bustle of the commercial corridors of Lancaster and York, Pa. The road is flanked by farms and fields on both sides, but suddenly you spy an oddly shaped building quickly coming into view.

You do a double take because you can’t believe what you’re seeing and immediately take the next exit. Following the old Lincoln Highway to the appropriately named Shoe House Road, you’ve just been lured away from your original destination by a local landmark and example of programmatic architecture -- Haines Shoe House in Hallam, Pa.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

 

In 1958 and 1959, influential Modernist architect Harwell Hamilton Harris designed what many consider to be one of his best buildings, the Cranfill Apartments in Austin, Texas. Before leading the University of Texas at Austin’s architecture school in the early 1950s, he apprenticed with Modernist pioneer Richard Neutra in Los Angeles and admired Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House. Harris made his reputation by using warm, natural materials to make Modernism more approachable, and creating spaces that connect with the outdoors.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

If you love grand architecture on an epic scale, admire remarkable feats of engineering, and want to learn about the preservation tragedy that galvanized and kickstarted the modern preservation movement, watch “The Rise and Fall of Penn Station” on PBS tonight.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

 

Rosewood Courts’ original site plan, along a terraced hillside in East Austin, included many outdoor spaces for socializing. Credit: Housing Authority of the City of Austin
Rosewood Courts’ original site plan, along a terraced hillside in East Austin, included many outdoor spaces for socializing.

Like many American cities at the time, Austin, Texas, in the 1930s was a racially segregated place -- including with its public housing. During the years leading up to World War II, the city’s housing authority (one of the oldest in the nation) built three low-income housing communities in the East Austin neighborhood, each reserved for a single race until desegregation in the 1960s.

Santa Rita Courts, which is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was dedicated to Hispanic and Latino residents, while Chalmers Courts was for whites only. And Rosewood Courts, a community that may eventually join Santa Rita Courts on the National Register, was built specifically for African-Americans. Rosewood’s complex and layered history, along with its location in rapidly gentrifying East Austin, make its future a subject of intense interest to Austin preservationists.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

10 Preservation Wins in 2013

Posted on: December 30th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 9 Comments

 

For anyone worried that year '13 would prove unlucky for the beautiful places in our midst, take heart: Though we did lose some irreplaceable historic places this past year, we also celebrated a remarkable number of preservation wins throughout the country. Let's look back at some of 2013's biggest success stories and get inspired for the year ahead!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.