Architecture

 

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The Frederick R. Buell residence

Frederick R. Buell Residence Seeks Elmer Grey Fan with Laidback Taste

2726 E. Kenwood Blvd. -- Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Take a look at me. I mean a really good look. For you Elmer Grey fans, do you see anything familiar? I hope so, because I’m the renowned architect’s first solo commission. Though I’m not as well known as the Pasadena Playhouse or as famous as the Beverly Hills Hotel (two of Grey’s most celebrated works), I hold the essence of Grey’s early genius.

All of his fine detail and unparalleled style is revealed when you open any of my many windows. The sunlight rushes in and illuminates the intricate woodwork throughout my hallways, bedrooms, kitchen, and especially around my two fireplaces in the parlor and front room.

Having the bragging rights of living in an Elmer Grey original is great, but I think it’s the little modern upgrades that make living in me especially worthwhile. Six spacious bedrooms (including an in-law suite with a kitchenette), a lower-level theater and game room, and a private yard with a patio and porch swing await you, ready to make your evenings laidback and leisurely.

Want to relax here? Check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Roadside Rest Shelters

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

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This rest area stands against the desert backdrop near Abiquiu, New Mexico.

Think back to your last road trip. Where did you stop for a bite to eat? What scenery did you study when you paused to stretch your legs?

Before options like drive-thrus and commercial travel centers made road travel a little more convenient, small roadside rest areas, many of which were built as part of the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, were a driver’s only option.

On a drive from Los Angeles to Austin, Texas, in 2007, photographer Ryann Ford took notice of these rest shelters. “As a photographer, it’s hard not to notice them,” she says. “They’re perfect minimalist structures set on a perfect landscape. And they’re each different in their own way.”

For the last six years, Ford has traveled the country documenting rest shelters along highways and in state and national parks.

“I think they tell the story of a different time,” she says. “Now, we’re so rushed with our travel. We just want to get from point A to point B really quickly, whether it’s by plane or jumping on the fastest highway and getting there as fast as possible. If you eat, it’s through a drive-thru. [These rest shelters] tell the story of a different era in travel, when it was about the journey.”

You can explore Ford’s full collection of photographs in her book, The Last Stop: Vanishing Relics of the American Roadside, due out from powerHouse Books next spring. Until then, you can see a sampling of her photos in the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation.

We’ve also shared a few more of her images here. And we’d love to hear from you. Share your memories of roadside rest areas below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Rhythm

Posted on: June 10th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson No Comments

 

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The south colonnade at George Washington's Mount Vernon displays a pattern of arches and columns.

When I learned to salsa dance, my teacher stressed the importance of listening to the rhythm so that we could keep our steps in time with the music. Keeping in step with the repetitive beats would help us stay oriented and looking pristine as we executed lavish turns and outlandish dips.

Although buildings don’t dance, they do have architectural elements that produce beautiful and unique rhythms. According to Preservation Virginia’s Glossary of Historic Preservation Terms, rhythm, as it pertains to buildings, is defined as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Photo Essay: Why Do Old Places Matter?

Posted on: May 13th, 2015 by Priya Chhaya

 

Santa Sabina, Rome. Photo by Nick Thompson via Flickr
Santa Sabina in Rome is an example of how a place can inspire awe and reflection.

In 2013 Tom Mayes, deputy general counsel at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, was selected as a winner of the Rome Prize, which is awarded to about 30 emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence.

When he isn’t working on legal complexities, Mayes has been considering the role historic places play in everyday life. This prestigious award sent him to Rome on a six-month tour of discovery where he sought to answer the question: Why do old places matter? This photo essay presents Mayes’ answers along with links to longer posts on the Preservation Leadership Forum blog that explore the answers in more depth.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Swag

Posted on: May 13th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The eagle wings depicted on the Lincoln Memorial are the supports for its swag.

Swag. You know, the word that’s short for swagger, that unique style that only you possess and the way in which you let people know that you’ve arrived at a place. Yeah, that swag. I have swag, you have swag, everyone has swag. But did you know that buildings have swag too?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Wilshire Boulevard Temple: Restoring a 1929 Landmark

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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The restored and renovated Wilshire Boulevard Temple in Los Angeles was on display in the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine. Dedicated in 1929 and named a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973, the temple had never undergone a major restoration until recently. Here, we take you on a deeper look inside this iconic house of worship.


Wilshire Boulevard Temple by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.