Architecture

Grand Central Terminal Arrives at 100 Years in Grand Style

Posted on: February 1st, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

Main hall at Grand Central Terminal. Credit: New York Transit Museum

Beneath the soaring Beaux Arts arches and star-speckled ceiling of the main concourse, New York’s iconic Grand Central Terminal has welcomed and bid farewell to scores of travelers, as well as its fair share of controversy, for decades. Ten decades to be exact. Today, the National Historic Landmark kicks off a year-long centennial celebration, 100 years after opening its doors and tracks. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Video] Central Library in St. Louis, Renewed

Posted on: January 31st, 2013 by David Robert Weible 7 Comments

 

Atrium at Central Library of the St. Louis Public Library. Credit: Jim Balogh, St. Louis Public Library
The 7-story atrium at Central Library.

The Central Library of the St. Louis Public Library is now in its 101st year, but thanks to a $68 million restoration and renovation, you’d think it was brand-new.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

The Power Plant Renovation: Imagination Becomes Adaptation

Posted on: January 30th, 2013 by Michael R. Allen 2 Comments

 

This is part 4 of our guest series on the remarkable transformation of a hospital power plant in St. Louis. Last week covered the plant's closure and deterioration, but today's post shares its exciting rebirth. Read the series to date.

Power Plant exterior after renovation. Credit: Climb So iLL
The Power Plant after renovation.

In 2010, the long-awaited renovation of the Power Plant building began, centered on finding a new use for the purpose-built structure. Developer Chris Goodson of Gilded Age partnered with Environmental Operations, Inc. to complete the renovation, and together they found an ideal match: Climb So iLL, a climbing gym looking for the ultimate home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Michael R. Allen

Michael R. Allen is the Director of the Preservation Research Office in St. Louis, which he founded in 2009. Recent activities include learning video editing and naming his cat after Oscar Niemeyer.

[Interview] Elizabeth Ellsworth, Maven of Midcentury Modern

Posted on: January 28th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Elizabeth Ellsworth stands in front of her Bimel Kehm house. Credit: Elizabeth Ellsworth

After retiring from a career as a marketing executive, Elizabeth Ellsworth began buying and restoring once-beautiful homes that had been tarnished by lack of maintenance or improper additions. In late 2012, she purchased the Island House. Built in 1954, it’s one of three residences designed by Bimel Kehm in New Canaan, Connecticut.

I called Elizabeth to get the skinny on the talented but enigmatic architect, her love for the house, and her restoration work.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Remembering Architecture Critic Ada Louise Huxtable

Posted on: January 9th, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

"On Architecture" by Ada Louise Huxtable.

The built environment lost one of its pillars this week when renowned architecture critic and ardent preservationist Ada Louise Huxtable passed away Monday at age 91. As the first full-time architecture critic for a daily American newspaper, Huxtable won the first Pulitzer Prize ever awarded for distinguished criticism in 1970, seven years after she joined the New York Times staff in 1963. In recent years, her writing appeared in the Wall Street Journal.

“Ada Louise Huxtable was one of the earliest and most consistent champions of preservation and the need for humanity in architecture,” says National Trust Executive Vice President and Chief Preservation Officer David J. Brown. “Her thoughtful perspective, along with her witty and sometimes sharp tongue, made her a force to be reckoned with in the field of planning, urban design, and preservation -- and a must-read for New Yorkers. She will be missed.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.