Architecture

[Photos] Wilshire Boulevard Temple: Restoring a 1929 Landmark

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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The restored and renovated Wilshire Boulevard Temple in Los Angeles was on display in the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine. Dedicated in 1929 and named a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973, the temple had never undergone a major restoration until recently. Here, we take you on a deeper look inside this iconic house of worship.


Wilshire Boulevard Temple by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

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Post-earthquake, the first floor of the 1886 winery building leans about four feet to the west.

At 3:20 a.m. on August 24, 2014, the ground in Napa, California started shaking, heralding a 6.0 magnitude earthquake. It was the region's largest seismic activity since 1989's Loma Prieta quake, and although it only lasted about 10 to 20 seconds, varying by location, that was more than enough time for the temblor to tear buildings apart, spark fires, and send hundreds to area hospitals with injuries. It also caused millions of dollars worth of damage to homes, businesses and infrastructure, and especially the region's famous wineries.

One of the hardest hit wineries was Trefethen Family Vineyards, an operation known throughout the valley for its unique wooden production building dating from 1886. I spoke with Hailey Trefethen, a third-generation vintner who works with her family’s winemaking and viticulture operations, about the damage sustained to Trefethen’s iconic National Register-listed building and the rehabilitation efforts than are underway.

Now propped up on steel buttresses, the building is estimated to take about one to two years to restore, and the total cost of the overhaul is not yet known. The Trefethen family, however, hasn’t let the damage to its beloved building crush its spirits.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Q&A] The Chautauqua Amphitheater: An Insider’s Guide

Posted on: February 4th, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

The Amphitheater's open-air construction is one of its defining characteristics. It's speeches and concerts can be heard for blocks through the warm summer air.

The Amphitheater's open-air construction is one of its defining characteristics. Its speeches and concerts can be heard for blocks through the warm summer air.

Since it opened in 1875, the Chautauqua Institution in western New York has served as one of the great centers for public discourse on the important issues facing American society. And since 1893, the Chautauqua Amphitheater has been at the center of both that discourse and the community of Chautauqua itself.

Last week, as part of an announcement of the Amphitheater as one of our newest National Treasures, we published a Q&A with Vanity Fair architecture critic Paul Goldberger discussing the threat to the 4,000-seat, open-air structure’s historical integrity. This week, we thought we’d follow up with a Q&A with three life-long Chautauquans about what the Amp means to them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Historic Real Estate: $500,000 and Below, Bargain Edition

Posted on: January 29th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

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The Glossbrenner Mansion was designed by British architect Alfred Grindle.

The Glossbrenner Mansion -- Indianapolis, Indiana
The Glossbrenner Mansion was built in 1910 and designed in the Tudor style by British architect Alfred Grindle. This house has carved oak, mahogany, and Circassion walnut paneling along with beautiful stain glass windows complimented by carved stone. This spacious mansion has three stories, five bedrooms, and five half bathrooms. It is in need of tender loving care for further restoration. Price: $500,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Since it opened as a Sunday School in 1875, the Chautauqua Institution has helped spark and sustain a broader movement in education, culture, and spirituality in communities throughout the country. Today, this 750-acre education center on the shores of western New York’s Lake Chautauqua continues to serve as a summertime retreat and intellectual, spiritual, and cultural wellspring.

At the institution’s center is the 1893 Chautauqua Amphitheater, a 4,000-seat, roofed, open air structure internationally recognized as a forum for American culture and history. Its wooden stage has hosted Franklin D. Roosevelt, Susan B. Anthony, Thurgood Marshall, Bobby Kennedy, Ella Fitzgerald, Amelia Earhart, Booker T. Washington, Bill and Hilary Clinton, and Sandra Day O’Connor, to name just a few.

But the building is in jeopardy. Despite a recent delay in the Chautauqua Institution’s decision-making process, there is a chance “the Amp” -- as it’s affectionately known -- may be replaced by a replica structure. In an effort to save the Amp, the National Trust has chosen it as our newest National Treasure.

To get a better sense of just how important the Chautauqua Amphitheater’s survival is, I spoke with Vanity Fair architecture critic and National Trust board member, Paul Goldberger.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Behind the Scenes: Cannon House Office Building Renewal

Posted on: January 26th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

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The Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C. is undergoing a ten-year restoration.

Preservation was recently invited by the Architect of the Capitol (AOC) to the Cannon Renewal Project press briefing to see the current condition of the oldest Congressional office and hear more about the ten-year plan underway to restore and preserve it.  On hand to discuss the renewal project were Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers; Superintendent of House Office Buildings William Weidemeyer; and Historian of the U.S. House of Representatives Matthew A. Wasniewski.

Built in 1908, the Beaux-Arts style Cannon House Office Building (known on Capitol Hill by its acronym, "CHOB" or simply “Cannon”) was designed by prominent New York-based architecture firm Carrère and Hastings. Located just one block south of the U.S. Capitol, Cannon is home to the offices of 142 U.S. Representatives across five floors, and includes four committee hearing rooms, the historic Caucus Room, and the Rotunda.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.