Architecture

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): Judas Priest (Rob Halford, K.K. Downing, Glenn Tipton, Ian Hill, and Dave Holland)
Venue: Mid-South Coliseum
Location: Memphis, Tennessee
Date: December 12, 1982
Memorable Moment: The absurd coordinated guitar playing/dancing of Downing and Tipton, sometimes joined by Halford when the mood struck him.
Show Vibe: Hey man, it was the ‘80s. (Thrusts thumb, index, and pinky fingers into the air.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[In Transition] Pilgrim Baptist Church: Chicago, Illinois

Posted on: August 25th, 2015 by Gwendolyn Purdom No Comments

 

Our In Transition series digs back in and brings you up to speed on the current status of historic places previously featured in Preservation magazine or the PreservationNation blog.

150825_blog_photo_pilgrim-baptist-church_ext-historical
The original Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, later the Pilgrim Baptist Church.

When Preservation featured Chicago’s Pilgrim Baptist Church in its May/June 2008 issue, the striking 19th-century house of worship had already suffered the blows of a devastating fire and trouble moving restoration efforts beyond the planning stages in the years immediately afterward. Nearly a decade later, those efforts remain stunted. But as neighbors have grown weary of the obtrusive scaffolding that still supports the church’s limestone walls, at least one group has other plans for the embattled structure: turning it into a park.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Gwendolyn Purdom

Gwendolyn Purdom

Gwendolyn Purdom is a former Preservation magazine editor and currently a writer, producer, and host at TouchVision TV in Chicago.

Picture This: Moving the Otis Mason House

Posted on: August 18th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By the National Trust Historic Sites Team

A month ago we witnessed something pretty spectacular near our historic site of Woodlawn and Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey -- the c. 1873 Otis Mason House was moved from its current site to a temporary location as a result of the widening and rerouting of Route 1. Wolfe House and Building Movers was contracted to lift and move the house some 400 feet, which will remain on the temporary site until the construction of the new foundation and basement is complete.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Architectural Conservation

Posted on: August 12th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

150812_blog-photo_Cannon-house-repairs-Architectural-Conservation
Architect of the Capitol masons repair the balustrade of the Cannon House Office Building.

“Conservation” is a term that we most associate with protecting the natural environment. However, “conservation” -- or more technically, “architectural conservation” -- can also be used to refer to the protection of the built environment.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources Historic Preservation Division Glossary of Preservation Services and Terminology defines it as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

Written by Anya Grahn

150803_blog-photo_Park-City,-Utah-building
Single-wall structures can be found throughout the Pacific Northwest, West, and the South. Some communities, such as Park City, Utah, have found ingenious ways to restore these structures.

Chances are that if you live in a community that sprung up because of sawmills, railroads, oilfields, or even mining, your historic structure may be comprised of single-wall, plank wall, or box house construction.

Rapid population growth during times of economic boom required the immediate construction of buildings, and single-wall construction or “wood tents” allowed communities to meet mounting demands. These rudimentary wood structures were meant to provide temporary shelter; however, many have been successfully preserved and continue to be used today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Tuberculosis Sanitariums: Reminders of the White Plague

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 5 Comments

 

Written by Anya Grahn

150803_blog-photo_anya's-photos
Left: Consumptives playing in front of an open-air cottage at the Wisconsin State Sanitarium (circa 1940). Right: Mae Panzenhagen Strong in front of the Wisconsin State Sanitarium where she had been a patient (circa 1945).

For centuries, the white plague -- also known as tuberculosis (TB) or consumption -- was considered an ailment of the poor. The rich often escaped the embarrassment of the disease by retreating to European health spas, while the poor continued to suffer with no relief. As the Industrial Revolution brought more workers into crowded urban centers, the plague spread and no one was immune.

Bacteriologist Robert Koch’s germ theory in 1882 provided better insight into the disease, and lent itself to explaining the spread of tuberculosis. State and local anti-tuberculosis organizations led social movements to improve sanitary conditions through anti-spitting laws and health regulations; encouraged consumptives to seek medical treatment; and persuaded state and local governments to create a network of state and county hospitals that isolated consumptives.

These sanitariums mark the beginning of government-funded campaigns to address tuberculosis. At these sites, consumptives spent years seeking a cure through prescribed regimens of fresh air and sunlight. Located away from local urban populations, these self-sufficient medical complexes became isolated communities containing a series of buildings that provided housing for patients and staff, medical and administrative offices, utility plants, and other uses. While many of these structures have been lost, others have found new uses as housing developments, medical facilities, and even museums.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.