Architecture

 

Written by Tina Connor, Executive Vice President, Indiana Landmarks

A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley Peters.
A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley (Wes) Peters.

Most people know of Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous and influential American architect. Wes Peters (1921-1991), his right-hand man? Not so much.

Wright’s first Taliesin apprentice in 1932, Peters took a two-year break from the architect and returned to his hometown of Evansville, Indiana, from mid-1933 to 1935. Love caused the flight: Peters fell in love with Wright’s stepdaughter Svetlana, then a teenager, and her parents mightily disapproved.

Two years later, the Wrights relented. Peters and Svetlana married and returned to Taliesin, where Peters remained for the rest of his life, becoming chief architect after the master’s death in 1959 and retaining the title until his own death in 1991.

Though he would never claim credit as first, the humble apprentice designed the Usonian-style Peters-Margedant House in Evansville in 1935, two years before Frank Lloyd Wright’s first Usonian appeared in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1937. The Evansville house shows that Peters internalized Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture and his thoughts on creating affordable homes. Art historian Richard Guy Wilson believes the tiny house possesses national significance.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

New Art, Old Places: Four Examples of Inspiration Amplified

Posted on: October 6th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Katherine Malone-France, Vice President for Historic Sites

141006_blog-photo_InSite_case-study2-luftwerk
Luftwerk at Farnsworth House

In his Why Old Places Matter series, Tom Mayes has written eloquently about the relationship between creativity and old places, a connection on vivid display at National Trust Historic Sites across the country. Right now, four of our sites have dramatic new installations that push the boundaries of their interpretations while being powerfully linked to their histories.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Historic Real Estate: Victorian Architecture Edition

Posted on: July 4th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 3 Comments

 

Credit: The Marshall Walker Group
This 1919 farmhouse was renovated in 2007, and architect Beau Clowney made sure to preserve the 280-degree view of the Wadmalaw Sound. 

Victorian architecture became popular in the United States between 1860 and 1900 and refers to the building styles that arose in Britain and the rest of the Western world during the later years of Queen Victoria's reign (1837-1901). Victorian takes from the preceding Georgian architecture and fuses it with Middle East and Asian styles. The result is a beautiful combination of classic styles and international nuances -- with many lovely examples on Historic Properties for Sale.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

 

Credit: Alan C. Spector
Built in 1954, the Spring House's hemicycle design is considered the last architecture phase of Frank Lloyd Wright's career. 

In 1950, a woman by the name of Clifton Lewis sought out none other than Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home for her. And he did: the Spring House in Tallahassee, Florida. Despite its modest boat-like shape and rural location, the Spring House represented a significant point in Wright's career, attracted architect buffs from around the world, and was even involved with the Civil Rights movement.

Today, however, the house is slowly deteriorating from harsh weather conditions and neglect, and the day may come when the only private home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in the state of Florida no longer stands. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

[Instagram Tour] Behind the Scenes at Union Station

Posted on: June 3rd, 2014 by Grant Stevens 4 Comments

 

Credit: brilliantartistry, Instagram
The top of the main hall | Fun Fact: Saint Gaudens designed these statues without shields. The railroad owners felt that the bare-legged statues might offend the ladies. As a way to get back at the resistance, the sculptor decided to give the statues a little extra. There are some interesting surprises behind some of these shields. -- @brilliantartistry, Jarrett Hendrix

While waiting in the Washington, D.C., Union Station Main Hall, many visitors look up to admire the beautiful barrel-vaulted ceilings currently undergoing restoration or the statues of Roman legionnaires that look down from stories above. Rarely, however, do you see people looking back at you.

Saturday, May 31 was an exception. In partnership with the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation (USRC), the National Trust led four behind-the-scenes tours of Union Station, taking photographers and Instagrammers to spaces rarely open to the public.

We’ve compiled some of our favorite photos from the day, as well as information about each of the stops. You can find more photos on Instagram or Twitter by searching #unionstationtour. Be sure to follow @SavingPlaces too!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.