Adaptive Reuse

 

Rosenwald Schools once served generations of teachers, students, parents, and other community members. Today, the schools’ walls continue to tell stories of segregation, perseverance, and the importance of education -- like those from Mabel Dickey, who attended Mt. Zion near Florence, S.C., and Bishop Frederick C. James, who attended Howard Bishop High School in Prosperity, S.C.

Stories like these make the preservation of Rosenwald Schools unique, and they’re the reason the National Trust launched a campaign to save as many remaining schools as possible.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Preserve Places of Worship, Part Two

Posted on: August 6th, 2013 by Emily Potter 5 Comments

 

As with any type of historic site, churches, synagogues, and mosques can find themselves at risk when no longer in use. The key difference: They have a religious context and sacred atmosphere that deserve special attention and care.

Last week, we began this conversation with ten questions to ask at the outset of any preservation or reuse project concerning a sacred space. This week, we have ten things to consider when planning for the most sympathetic reuse possible of a place of worship.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

The House that Radio Built: NPR's New Headquarters Celebrates Preservation

Posted on: June 18th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

NPR’s new headquarters building, where old effortlessly meets shiny and new.
NPR’s new headquarters building, where old effortlessly meets shiny and new.

For most people, moving means cardboard boxes, heavy lifting, and forgetting where you packed your underwear. However, for National Public Radio, a recent relocation meant making something old new again.

NPR’s shiny new headquarters is built atop the National Register-listed Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company Warehouse. As an anchor in an emerging neighborhood, the organization is a terrific example of how preservation supports the future.

National Trust correspondents Jason Clement and Julia Rocchi had the chance to tour the building. Here’s what they thought -- to quote NPR’s “founding mother” Susan Stamberg -- of “the house that radio built.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Old Milwaukee Is New Again: Pabst Brewhouse Becomes Brewhouse Inn & Suites

Posted on: May 6th, 2013 by David Robert Weible

 

Original PBR campus. Credit: Brewhouse Inn & Suites
The Brewhouse, part of the original Pabst campus, built in 1892.

Milwaukee is a hard-nosed town. It was built on heavy machinery, third shifters, and the no-nonsense beer they drank after the whistle blew. And though decades of decline had left the city largely stale and generally unpalatable, Milwaukeeans -- true to form -- brewed up a solution and followed a cue from one of their city’s icons, Pabst Blue Ribbon: They started to take old Milwaukee and make it cool again.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Exterior of 508 Park Avenue. Credit: Alan Govenar/508Park, flickr

Robert Johnson was never a rock star, but the 13 tracks the wandering blues musician laid down at the makeshift studio inside 508 Park Avenue in Dallas in 1937 eventually inspired musicians like Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, and Eric Clapton (who even recorded there in 2004). Now, thanks to a $12 million restoration project headed by the Stewpot, a homeless shelter located across the street, the building itself will have an opportunity to do the same for generations of musicians to come.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.