Adaptive Reuse

[Slideshow] UPDATE: Painted DC Church Now Artistic Inside and Out

Posted on: November 25th, 2013 by Emily Potter

 

Renovated Friendship Baptist Church. Credit: Gerry Suchy
The former Friendship Baptist Church is unique for its eclectic use of Victorian and Romanesque architectural styles combined with Gothic Revival and Queen Anne elements.

Back in the spring, we presented a slideshow of how graffiti artist HENSE transformed a vacant historic church in Washington, D.C., into a work of art.

Today, the building is home to Blind Whino: SW Arts Club, a local nonprofit organization that promotes creativity and learning in an inspirational and artistic environment.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

What Los Angeles Taught Me about Building Reuse From the Inside Out

Posted on: November 8th, 2013 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Jeana Wiser, Project Coordinator, Preservation Green Lab

The popular monthly Downtown Art Walk attracts over 25,000 visitors and includes over 50 art gallery spaces and exhibits. Credit: mikeywally, Flickr
The popular monthly Downtown Art Walk attracts over 25,000 visitors and includes over 50 art gallery spaces and exhibits.

I think it’s safe to say that many people think of cars and sprawl when they think of Los Angeles. Granted, that is part of the LA story, but it’s definitely not the whole story. As a recent transplant to Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA), I am constantly learning new things about Los Angeles that challenge many of the commonly held beliefs about the City of Angels.

One of the most interesting attributes of Los Angeles, especially as it relates to historic and old buildings, is the culture of ‘reuse’ that exists in many parts of the city. Most famously, the downtown historic core has been using the innovative Adaptive Reuse Ordinance (ARO) for the past 14 years in an effort to re-imagine downtown as a 24/7 activity center with more full-time residents.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Tenants in the Rice Mill Lofts are prohibited from altering the building’s original graffiti. Credit: Studio WTA Architects
Tenants in the Rice Mill Lofts are prohibited from altering the building’s original graffiti.

If you’ve ever longed to make your home in a century-old industrial rice mill amid preserved graffiti and masonry brick walls, New Orleans’ Rice Mill Lofts might be the perfect place for you.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Written by Andy Grabel, Manager, Public Affairs

From historic power plants to breweries to schoolhouses, the adaptive reuse potential of old buildings is seemingly limitless. Today’s toolkit features tips to help you promote reuse in your own community as well as several examples of successful reuse projects.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Ric Cochrane, Project Manager, Preservation Green Lab

Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas; food at his restaurant Lola. Credit: Tom Douglas; conjunction3, Flickr
Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas; food at his restaurant Lola.

“Buildings have a temperature,” Tom Douglas says, sitting at the bar of his popular restaurant, Lola, one of ten in his Seattle food empire. “Old buildings are warm. Many new buildings are ice cold. I’m not talking about temperature -- I’m talking about intimacy. People want to eat good food in intimate spaces. New is rarely warm.”

To Douglas, intimacy means local character, the story of a place that adds to the experience of eating his famous food. He says old buildings often come with stories built in: “I love new buildings -- they’re much easier [compared to renovating old buildings]. But they don’t tell stories.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.