Adaptive Reuse

 

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10612 Old Court Rd. -- Woodstock, Maryland

Converted Granite Schoolhouse Seeks Learned Buyer Willing to Be Tutored in Fun

From the looks of me, you might think I was built as a mini mansion or a small villa for some rich historical figure. You probably wouldn’t believe that I was originally constructed as a school in the late 19th century from locally quarried granite. Sixty-odd years later, my doors closed to pupils and instructors and I was lovingly converted into a snazzy, upscale dwelling.

Even though I’ve been made over, I haven’t lost my scholastic touch. The astute buyer will see that each room holds a lesson or two. For example, you can learn new culinary skills in my updated gourmet kitchen. Or improve your choral skills in the shower of any one of my four bathrooms. Or enjoy recreational time and host recess in my beautifully manicured, one-acre backyard.

Sound like fun? Want to learn more? Educate yourself with this video tour and check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Tuberculosis Sanitariums: Reminders of the White Plague

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 5 Comments

 

Written by Anya Grahn

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Left: Consumptives playing in front of an open-air cottage at the Wisconsin State Sanitarium (circa 1940). Right: Mae Panzenhagen Strong in front of the Wisconsin State Sanitarium where she had been a patient (circa 1945).

For centuries, the white plague -- also known as tuberculosis (TB) or consumption -- was considered an ailment of the poor. The rich often escaped the embarrassment of the disease by retreating to European health spas, while the poor continued to suffer with no relief. As the Industrial Revolution brought more workers into crowded urban centers, the plague spread and no one was immune.

Bacteriologist Robert Koch’s germ theory in 1882 provided better insight into the disease, and lent itself to explaining the spread of tuberculosis. State and local anti-tuberculosis organizations led social movements to improve sanitary conditions through anti-spitting laws and health regulations; encouraged consumptives to seek medical treatment; and persuaded state and local governments to create a network of state and county hospitals that isolated consumptives.

These sanitariums mark the beginning of government-funded campaigns to address tuberculosis. At these sites, consumptives spent years seeking a cure through prescribed regimens of fresh air and sunlight. Located away from local urban populations, these self-sufficient medical complexes became isolated communities containing a series of buildings that provided housing for patients and staff, medical and administrative offices, utility plants, and other uses. While many of these structures have been lost, others have found new uses as housing developments, medical facilities, and even museums.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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The exterior of the rehabilitated Firestone Building.

Last year, the rehabilitation of the 1920s Firestone building in Gainesville, Florida was completed. Phoebe Cade Miles (the daughter of Gatorade inventor Dr. James Cade) and her husband, Richard Miles, of the Cade Museum, sponsored the project and worked with father/son team Richard and Ryland Wagner of Joyner Construction to complete the rehabilitation. The project was so well done that the Wagners were recognized by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation with an Honorable Mention for Adaptive Reuse award.

Recently, we sat down with Phoebe and Richard to talk about the Firestone rehabilitation project.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Sagacious Schoolhouse Seeks Sharp Student Willing to Learn New Lesson

4919 Chapman Rd -- Delaware, Ohio 

I began hosting educators and their pupils in the 1800s. Though I’ve long since graduated from active learning institution to historic structure, I still have a few lessons I’d like to share. So take a seat. School is back in session!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Historic Bars] Flat Tire Lounge in Madrid, Iowa

Posted on: July 2nd, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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Flat Tire Lounge is in an old Quonset hut originally used by the railroad. It now features a new 800-square-foot deck.

A pint of beer after a summer afternoon bike ride? Yes, please.

Flat Tire Lounge in Madrid, Iowa, can deliver just that. This bike-friendly bar opened in 2011 as the vision of a group of local friends.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

All Aboard! Check Out These Train Depots-Turned-Restaurants

Posted on: March 23rd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 30 Comments

 

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The Fullerton Union Pacific Station now houses The Old Spaghetti Factory restaurant.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation, we feature three train depots-turned-restaurants.  Now, we’ve rounded up three more transformed train depots that are sure to supply the tasty ticket for your taste buds.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.