Author Archive

Uptop, Colorado: A Ghost Town With a Beating Heart

Posted on: July 7th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 1 Comment

 

Credit: Larry Lamsa, Flickr
Uptop, Colorado, was settled in 1877, but remains a ghost town outside La Veta.

When you hear the term “ghost town,” you probably imagine a diminishing population, failing industries, and bleak economic fortunes. That’s why the story of Uptop, Colorado -- a 40-acre settlement, established in 1877, near the town of La Veta -- paves the way for a newer understanding of what it means to be a ghost town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

Historic Real Estate: Victorian Architecture Edition

Posted on: July 4th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 3 Comments

 

Credit: The Marshall Walker Group
This 1919 farmhouse was renovated in 2007, and architect Beau Clowney made sure to preserve the 280-degree view of the Wadmalaw Sound. 

Victorian architecture became popular in the United States between 1860 and 1900 and refers to the building styles that arose in Britain and the rest of the Western world during the later years of Queen Victoria's reign (1837-1901). Victorian takes from the preceding Georgian architecture and fuses it with Middle East and Asian styles. The result is a beautiful combination of classic styles and international nuances -- with many lovely examples on Historic Properties for Sale.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

 

Credit: Alan C. Spector
Built in 1954, the Spring House's hemicycle design is considered the last architecture phase of Frank Lloyd Wright's career. 

In 1950, a woman by the name of Clifton Lewis sought out none other than Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home for her. And he did: the Spring House in Tallahassee, Florida. Despite its modest boat-like shape and rural location, the Spring House represented a significant point in Wright's career, attracted architect buffs from around the world, and was even involved with the Civil Rights movement.

Today, however, the house is slowly deteriorating from harsh weather conditions and neglect, and the day may come when the only private home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in the state of Florida no longer stands. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

 

Continuing our historic bars series, we take a look at the Slippery Noodle Inn, a well-known yet still genuine local bar in Indianapolis.

140626_blog_photo_SlipperyNoodle_Bar_SaraEtherington
The ceiling of the front bar is made of pressed tin and was installed around 1890. The "tiger oak" bar and the bar in the back are more than 100 years old as well.

"When a tourist comes to Indianapolis and asks where to grab a drink, they'll probably be told to go to the Slippery Noodle," says Sara Etherington, office manager of the historic Indiana watering hole.

With live music seven nights a week, a loyal constituent of thirsty locals, and the distinction of being the longest continuously operating bar in Indiana, "the Noodle" boasts a unique mix of having a well-known status and a consistent down-to-earth reputation.

"People like something local and unique," says Etherington. "It's one-of-a-kind."

Certainly the Noodle's famous breaded pork tenderloin, its half-priced Thursdays (a favorite among the locals, according to Etherington), and the every-night live music bring in the patrons, but the bar's appeal is rooted in something deeper than a savvy business model and a charming atmosphere: its history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

American World’s Fairs Icons that Have Stood the Test of Time

Posted on: June 20th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 6 Comments

 

Credit: Library of Congress, Wikimedia Commons
An aerial-view print of the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y.

The World’s Fair is one of the longest-running international exhibitions, in which countries gather to showcase premier inventions -- from Belgian waffles and ice cream to X-ray machines and electrical current systems. Ever since the first World’s Fair in 1851, which took place in London, host countries have constructed the most fantastic buildings, each outdoing the previous host.

During the Paris Universal Exposition in 1889, France erected the Eiffel Tower. In return, Chicago unveiled the never-before-seen Ferris wheel during the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which drew a crowd equal to a third of the U.S. population at the time. However, most World’s Fair buildings are constructed to be temporary, torn down after the one-time event.

Fortunately, not all World’s Fair buildings are demolished, and some even become the most iconic symbol of a city: Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, the New York State Pavilion, and certainly the Eiffel Tower. The upcoming World’s Fair will take place in Milan next year, but let’s take a look at some of the most iconic buildings that were built for the World’s Fair that have stood the test of time here in the United States.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.