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Back in May, before we were aware of the danger the nation’s economy was truly in, we named California’s State Parks to our annual list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places when the state’s budget woes led to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger recommending drastic cuts that would have closed 48 parks. Changes to the state’s budget, along with increased user fees, kept the parks open, but California’s woes have proven, sadly, not to be unique. Over Thanksgiving weekend, Governor Rod Blagojevich of Illinois announced that earlier-suggested closings of seven parks and a dozen historic sites would go forward, and our local partner, Preservation New Jersey, has posted updates to their blog about site closings in the Garden State.

Yesterday, in his remarks at a governor’s conference in Philadelphia, President-elect Barack Obama made it clear that the risk the economic downturn poses to our country’s heritage has not gone unnoticed – he included the closure of historic sites in a list of the difficult choices being made on the state level. (The mention comes at 2:27 in the video below.)

California, Illinois, and New Jersey are not alone in having their state parks and historic sites threatened by the economic downturn – it’s a nationwide situation. Share what’s happening where you live below.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Update: The live-streaming of this presentation has concluded. Greenbuild will be providing on-demand video soon; in the meantime, you can read Mr. Moe's speech on our website.

Earlier this week, my colleague Patrice Frey wrote a post about the intense summit held recently at Pocantico in Tarrytown, NY "to discuss the future of historic preservation in light of global warming, and specifically the implications of climate change for preservation policy." In her post, Patrice mentioned that the president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Richard Moe, would be introducing the six principles that summarize the outcome of that meeting at this week's Greenbuild conference in Boston.

This speech, entitled Historic Preservation and Green Building: Finding Common Ground, will be streamed live online later this morning (November 20) from 8:00-9:30 a.m. EST on this page on the Greenbuild site. So, while you enjoy your morning coffee or check your email, tune in to hear about the important relationship between preservation and sustainability. After all, why just recycle cans and bottles, when you can also recycle buildings!

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Learn more about the National Trust for Historic Preservation's sustainability initiative.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

President-Elect Barack Obama. (Photo: BarackObama.com)

President-Elect Barack Obama. (Photo: BarackObama.com)

Here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, we take pride in the fact that we have supporters of all political stripes. A love of, and respect for, the places that matter to us as people and as a nation transcends ideology; historic preservation is a cause that has room for everyone. And just as President-Elect Obama  last night told the nation that he'd work to be everyone's president -- even of those whose votes he didn't receive -- we also want to be a preservation organization that speaks for all of us.

We've crafted a preservation platform that we will soon deliver to the transition team. Take our platform survey now to make your voice heard in our goals for our new administration.

Last night, Barack Obama made history. Every day, with your help, we work to save it.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

My apologies for the delay in this week's Preservation Round-Up. Our usual recapper is in Tulsa at the National Preservation Conference, so I'm jumping in, albeit a little late.

In the midst of our current hotly-contested presidential election, it's no surprise that politics is on everyone's mind -- including preservationists. Katie Eggers Comeau at the Landmark Society of Western New York has written a great, nonpartisan post about politics and preservation:

After all, historic preservation ties into issues that candidates on both sides hold dear: it’s about strengthening local economies and creating local jobs, revitalizing historic downtowns and neighborhoods, conserving a unique sense of place, protecting the environment, and protecting and promoting the places that have contributed to our national character over the generations.

Preservation New Jersey shares the stories of two specific sites that are threatened and draws connections between the budget woes in the Garden State and recent concerns that have left sites in California and Illinois similarly at risk.

The Governor and Administration have warned fans and supporters of state historic sites and parks that new sources of non-tax revenue must be found in order to keep these important places open and available to NJ citizens.

In 2006, we listed Kenilworth, Illinios on our annual list of America's 11 Most Endangered Places as its historic homes were at risk from teardowns. A little over two years later, Vince Michael has taken a look at the ways Kenilworth residents are fighting the trend -- and the opposition they continue to face.

So, the village came up with a clever plan: list the town on the National Register of Historic Places. This adds NO regulation to homeowners and provides NO protection against teardowns, but addresses the media embarrassment. It also would allow ONLY THOSE HOMEOWNERS WHO WANT TO to take advantage of the Illinois Property Tax Assessment Freeze program. Upside without a downside.

Hmm... I've picked a couple of heavy topics there, so I'll end with a couple of lighter ones:

Our own Max van Balgooy, director of interpretation and education for National Trust Historic Sites, has recapped the lessons he learned at the Attingham Summer School program in England:

Personally, the greatest value of the Attingham Summer School is experiencing the interplay between art, furniture, rooms, buildings, and landscape. It truly points out the distinctions among historic sites, museums, and art galleries.

If this sounds like it might be up your alley, the application deadline for next year's course is January 31, 2009.

Preservation Greensboro is getting into the spirit of the season with a family-friendly evening of supernatural tales at the Blandwood Mansion this Saturday.

Blandwood’s front parlor is among the best-preserved Victorian interior's in North Carolina, and no better place to hear a story.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Farnsworth House Offering Restoration Tours to Raise Funds

Posted on: October 9th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

Less than one month ago, the Farnsworth House, a National Trust Historic Site and icon of modernist architecture, was flooded in the by tropical storm Lowell and the aftermath of hurricane Ike. The house was closed to the public in the immediate aftermath, but is now opening on a limited schedule to help raise funds to repair the damage from the floods. These tours provide a rare chance to experience the restoration first-hand.

Detailed information on the tours -- as well as an opportunity to contribute -- are available at www.farnsworthhouse.org. And, In the event that you can't make it to Illinois for a tour, the staff of the  Farnsworth House have started a blog to share the progress of the restoration.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.