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Homeowner and New Orleans native Gayle Ruth was one of the first people to return to her historic home in the Lower Mid-City neighborhood after Hurricane Katrina. In the video below, she talks about the excitement that grew over time as people came back and renovated their homes -- and how all of their work may now be "for naught" as the area is the desired locale for a new hospital complex.

Learn more about our fight to save Mid-City. Or, take action now!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

 

There is no argument more compelling for saving New Orleans' Mid-City neighborhood than the words of the residents themselves. Many are life-long New Orleanians who came back after Hurricane Katrina to rebuild their homes. In this video, Wallace Thurman, a veteran, talks about losing the place where he was born -- and still lives today.

Help us save Mr. Thurman's home -- and those of the other residents of lower Mid-City. Take action today!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

LISTEN LIVE: Partners Discuss Charity Hospital/Mid-City on WRKF Radio

Posted on: December 5th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Our partners at the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, Sandra Stokes and Mark Upton, are on the the Jim Engster show on WRKF right now -- Friday, December 5 at 9:15 a.m. CST. They'll be talking about the ongoing crisis situation in Mid-City New Orleans. It is a call-in show, so if you want to be part of the discussion, there is an opportunity to participate. Information on live streaming and contacting the show is available at www.wrkf.org.

Update: The program is now over, but archived audio is available here.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

 

Back in May, before we were aware of the danger the nation’s economy was truly in, we named California’s State Parks to our annual list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places when the state’s budget woes led to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger recommending drastic cuts that would have closed 48 parks. Changes to the state’s budget, along with increased user fees, kept the parks open, but California’s woes have proven, sadly, not to be unique. Over Thanksgiving weekend, Governor Rod Blagojevich of Illinois announced that earlier-suggested closings of seven parks and a dozen historic sites would go forward, and our local partner, Preservation New Jersey, has posted updates to their blog about site closings in the Garden State.

Yesterday, in his remarks at a governor’s conference in Philadelphia, President-elect Barack Obama made it clear that the risk the economic downturn poses to our country’s heritage has not gone unnoticed – he included the closure of historic sites in a list of the difficult choices being made on the state level. (The mention comes at 2:27 in the video below.)

California, Illinois, and New Jersey are not alone in having their state parks and historic sites threatened by the economic downturn – it’s a nationwide situation. Share what’s happening where you live below.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

 

Update: The live-streaming of this presentation has concluded. Greenbuild will be providing on-demand video soon; in the meantime, you can read Mr. Moe's speech on our website.

Earlier this week, my colleague Patrice Frey wrote a post about the intense summit held recently at Pocantico in Tarrytown, NY "to discuss the future of historic preservation in light of global warming, and specifically the implications of climate change for preservation policy." In her post, Patrice mentioned that the president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Richard Moe, would be introducing the six principles that summarize the outcome of that meeting at this week's Greenbuild conference in Boston.

This speech, entitled Historic Preservation and Green Building: Finding Common Ground, will be streamed live online later this morning (November 20) from 8:00-9:30 a.m. EST on this page on the Greenbuild site. So, while you enjoy your morning coffee or check your email, tune in to hear about the important relationship between preservation and sustainability. After all, why just recycle cans and bottles, when you can also recycle buildings!

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Learn more about the National Trust for Historic Preservation's sustainability initiative.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.