Author Archive

Vote Early, Vote Often

Posted on: April 14th, 2009 by Sarah Heffern

 

Voting opened today for our annual Partners in Preservation program with American Express. This year, 25 sites in Greater Boston are competing for grant money. You can vote every day between now and May 17... That's right, every single day. The winner of the popular vote is guaranteed to win a grant, so getting involved can really make a difference.

We'll have an update from today's big announcement in Boston later today, but while you're waiting, visit the Partners in Preservation site and take a look at the contenders, pick your place, and cast your first vote.

Oh, and while you're online you can also invite a friend to vote and  become a fan of Partners in Preservation on Facebook!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Tell Us: What Place Matters to You?

Posted on: April 8th, 2009 by Sarah Heffern 2 Comments

 

Sharp-eyed preservationists watching Good Morning, America this past Saturday might have seen something familiar flash by in the "Your Three Words" segment. (Miss it? Go have a look... We'll wait.)

This Place Matters.

Chase Stone Barn, Wisconsin

Chase Stone Barn, Wisconsin

The folks at the Chase Stone Barn in Wisconsin filmed themselves shooting the photo above -- part of our This Place Matters campaign -- and sent it in to GMA for inclusion in the segment.  We're so excited that they got such great national exposure for their beautiful barn!

What place matters to you?

Honor a your special place by sharing your This Place Matters photo with us -- or plant a flag on our map if you're a little camera-shy. If you're like me and can't think of how to pick just one place, there's no need to worry. You can add a photo or flag for all your favorites!

Get started now »

This Place Matters is sponsored by Fireman's Fund Insurance Company because places that matter need to be protected. Learn more »

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Our own Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, has an op-ed in today's New York Times. It bears an unfortunate title, but that doesn't lessen its strong message about greening historic homes:

Experience has shown that virtually any older or historic house can become more energy-efficient without losing its character. Restoring the original features of older houses — like porches, awnings and shutters — can maximize shade and insulation. Older wooden windows perform very well when properly weatherized — this includes caulking, insulation and weather stripping — and assisted by the addition of a good storm window. Weatherizing leaky windows in most cases is much cheaper than installing replacements.

He goes on to point out that this retrofitting work has an additional benefit:

The labor-intensive process of rehabilitating older buildings would also create jobs, and this labor can’t be shipped overseas. The wages would stay in the community, supporting local businesses and significantly increasing household incomes — just the kind of boost the American economy needs right now.

The full article is available here. It's well worth reading.

Learn more about our sustainability initiative.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

NY Times on "The Greening of Pittsburgh"

Posted on: April 1st, 2009 by Sarah Heffern

 

Yesterday's New York Times featured an excellent story, "The Greening of Pittsburgh," which talks about the city's successes with sustainable development and historic preservation:

A number of century-old landmarks have been revived as energy-efficient buildings in the last decade, and several major projects, both new and retrofits, will open this spring.

Years before national environmental building standards were set in 2000, Pittsburgh began experimenting in sustainability as local architects, engineers and academics debated how to reuse old industrial sites.

Included in the examples cited by the article is the Children's Museum project, which won an Honor Award in 2006:

The Children’s Museum sought to blend a historic 1897 post office with a 1939 planetarium that had stood vacant since 1991. The solution — a glass lantern shape that appears to float between the grand older structures — reused original materials, like terrazzo, marble and copper. In 2006, the design won awards from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the American Institute of Architects.

You can read the full story here.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Cemetery Mystery Makes Local News

Posted on: March 13th, 2009 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

It's not every night that I'm flipping the channels and see one of my co-workers on the promo for the evening news -- but that's just what happened a couple of days ago. And not just any colleague, mind you, but the guy who sits in the office right next to mine. How I missed the film crew in my hallway I'll never know.

Our local Fox affiliate stopped by to interview Rob Nieweg, director of the Southern Field Office, for a truly fascinating story about how gravestones from one of DC's African-American cemeteries made their way to the banks of the Potomac River.

It's a story I hadn't heard before, and to me, it really demonstrates the breadth of work that happens at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. I've worked with Rob on projects like the Tomb of the Unknowns and the fight against the Wilderness Wal-Mart and sit literally in the next room -- yet, here's a whole piece of his work that's entirely new to me. As a chained-to-my-desk headquarters staffer, I am constantly blown away by the work our field staff are involved in. And so, since I know Rob isn't the sort to toot his own horn about being on television, I thought I'd share it here.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.