Author Archive

[Slideshow] Exploring "Iconic" Places with Photographer Brian Vanden Brink

Posted on: March 29th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

ICONIC Book Jacket/Cover, 2012.

Brian Vanden Brink has been photographing unforgettable historic places since the 1970s, when he moved to the coast of Maine and began shooting for architects and magazines. Since then, he has cemented a reputation as one of the nation’s foremost architectural photographers.

“The images in Iconic, my sixth book, cover more than 35 years of this work -- my whole photographic life,” he says. “It’s almost like a personal travel journal documenting experiences with buildings I feel are important ... Whether it’s because of the way these structures sit in the landscape -- or what they represent culturally or socially -- I felt they had to be brought together for readers to see and appreciate.”

James H. Schwartz, the National Trust’s vice president for editorial and creative strategy, recently spoke with Brian to learn more about his work and inspirations.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Write an Op-Ed/Letter to the Editor

Posted on: March 26th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Sarah Coquillat, Public Affairs Intern

In our last public relations-focused toolkit, we discussed how to pitch your preservation story to the news media. But if you have a time-sensitive or pressing preservation issue that you want to get in front of readers as soon as possible, then consider writing an op-ed or letter to the editor (LTE) instead. These allow you to express your opinion quickly while still reaching a large viewership.

Below are 10 tips on how to write a successful op-ed or letter to the editor about your preservation project.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

America's Antiquities Act Makes History with Five New National Monuments

Posted on: March 26th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director, Public Lands Policy

Rio Grande del Norte (Ute Mtn.) Credit: Adriel Heisey
Río Grande del Norte National Monument

Just a few days out from the beginning of the baseball season in Washington, D.C., President Obama batted in a Grand Slam with the establishment of five new national monuments. This is the first time the President has designated more than one national monument in a day, and every single one of them is rich in historic or cultural resources.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Women in Preservation: Nancy Schamu Reflects on Four Decades of Saving Places

Posted on: March 7th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

This profile, written by Byrd Wood, originally appeared on Preservation Leadership Forum blog. It has been edited for length and clarity.

Nancy Schamu. Credit: Nancy Schamu
Nancy Schamu

Preservationists often jokingly refer to some of the early pioneers in the preservation movement as "little old ladies in tennis shoes standing in front of bulldozers." But the movement changed dramatically in 1966 following the enactment of the National Historic Preservation Act, when a wave of young history graduates, eager to assume positions in the recently created state historic preservation offices, soon began to replace the feisty, determined volunteers of the early part of the century.

Nancy Schamu, who is retiring this month after 26 years with the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers (NCSHPO), was one of them, and she strode confidently into the new preservation profession with all the energy and idealism of her 1960s generation. From the early days of rousing Section 106 battles over elevated highways to today’s advocacy efforts to protect the tax credits, Schamu has been more than willing to "raise her hand," as she puts it, to speak out clearly -- and often quite forcefully -- in favor of preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Submit Your Local Project for a National Preservation Award

Posted on: March 5th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Brendan McCormick, Grants & Awards Assistant

Every year the National Trust celebrates the best in preservation by presenting the Richard H. Driehaus National Preservation Awards. In 2012, projects of all shapes and sizes were recognized, ranging from a small historic house museum on Hilton Head Island, SC, to the adaptive use of the 926,000-square-foot 30th Street Main Post Office in Philadelphia, to the almost extra-terrestrial-looking ASM International Headquarters in Materials Park, Ohio.

The National Preservation Awards celebrate not just the physical sites that were saved, but the people whose hard work went into saving that place. They are an opportunity to recognize communities that rally together and refuse to lose one of their local landmarks. Let's revisit some of the award-winners we've profiled recently who illustrate the power of people saving places.

Gullah Museum team. Credit: Butch Hirsch
Gullah Museum team

The Little House’s transformation into the Gullah Museum is proof that no project is too small to be recognized. After a two-year capital campaign and a community-wide restoration effort that included hundreds of volunteer hours, Gullah Museum of Hilton Head Island is a shining example of how a community can join together around preservation and save an important historic resource.

Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building. Credit: Rick Kready/The Pioneer Group
Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building

In Leavenworth, Kansas, another group of local preservationists rallied together to help save Eisenhower Ridge Building 19. The group, Veterans Administration Leavenworth Opportunity for Reuse, or VALOR, worked with the Veterans Administration and other local companies to save the building from demolition. Their efforts resulted in a state-of-the-art office building that brought 400 jobs back to Leavenworth.

Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration. Credit: Susanna Campbell Kuo
Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration

In 2003, concerned citizens of Lake Oswego, Oregon, noticed that their historic 1866 blast furnace, the Oswego Iron Furnace, was missing from the renovation plans for their community park. The community banded together and provided over 600 hours of volunteer work and research. Their findings helped convince the local government to fund the restoration of this community landmark.

Do you have a project that deserves recognition? We’d love to hear from you. The nomination deadline is this Friday, March 8.

For the application you will need:

  • A 6,000-character project description that describes the project from start to finish
  • A 4,000-character description of how this project is unique, why it deserves an award, and how it fits the award criteria
  • Up to five (5) supporting documents including brochures or news clippings
  • Up to three (3) letters of recommendation
  • A list of any other awards this project has received in the past
  • Fifteen (15) photos of the project, and a word document with photo captions and photo credits

Before applying, please read the full eligibility requirements and awards descriptions here. A link to the nomination form can be found at the bottom of the page. If you have any questions, please email awards@savingplaces.org.

Good luck!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.