Author Archive

This Thanksgiving, We're Thankful for Your Help in Saving Places!

Posted on: November 28th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

National Trust staffer Priya Chhaya said it beautifully last week: This year, we at the National Trust are thankful for the people of preservation.

As you just saw in the video above, your support has enabled us to accomplish great things this past year. From Los Angeles’ Terminal Island to Charleston’s historic waterfront, we have made a tangible difference across the country for the places we love.

We're also thankful for an unprecedented $10 million challenge grant from longtime preservationist Robert W. Wilson. As one of the largest gifts ever made to the National Trust, this extraordinary leadership contribution will have an enormous impact on the ground to save the inspiring sites that tell America’s story.

In the coming weeks we'll talk more about our vision for 2014, but we didn't want to let this day of gratitude pass without acknowledging your crucial role in saving places. Please accept our deepest thanks, and have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Deconstruction and Discovery: A West Virginia Community Digs into the McCoy Fort's Colonial Past

Posted on: November 15th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

Written by Kate Schminky, Public Affairs Intern

The current state of Fort McCoy. A significant chimney foundation is visible on the west side and a lesser defined chimney foundation can be seen on the opposite end. The structure, at 28' x 26', was two stories of nine logs each. Credit: Carolyn Stephens
The current state of the McCoy Fort. A significant chimney foundation is visible on the west side (bottom), while a lesser defined chimney foundation can be seen on the opposite end. The structure, at 28' x 26', was two stories of nine logs each.

Historians were in for a pleasant surprise in 2003 when a local history teacher directed archeologists Kim and Stephen McBride to a barn in West Virginia’s Greenbrier County. McCoy family tradition always suggested that the family’s original homestead was located in the county’s Sinking Valley, but an official discovery had yet to be made -- and no one thought it would involve so many sheep.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Save a Historic Veterans Affairs Hospital Campus

Posted on: November 12th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Amy Cole and Jenny Buddenborg, Denver Field Office

There are 150 historic hospital campuses operated by the Department of Veterans Affairs today, but many are threatened with closure, replacement with a “shiny, new” facility, or demolition of signature historic buildings. A new report from the National Trust offers recommendations for saving these campuses and buildings, and today’s toolkit boils it down to tips and examples you can use in your community.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Five Endangered Civil Rights Sites: Commemorating the March On Washington

Posted on: August 28th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

The March on Washington in 1963. Credit: American Jewish Historical Society.

Today, August 28, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the March On Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.'s historic "I Have a Dream" speech. In commemoration, last week we shared five preserved sites of the Civil Rights movement. Today -- on the March's actual anniversary -- we share five equally important sites that are currently endangered.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Five Saved Civil Rights Sites: Commemorating the March On Washington

Posted on: August 21st, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

The March on Washington. Credit: US Information Agency.

August 28, 2013 will mark the 50th anniversary of the March On Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The occasion is cause for reflection on the people and places that helped shape the civil rights movement.

Historic sites that represent the fight for equality in America are essential to telling the full story of this important chapter of our nation's history. To commemorate the moment, we present five sites that preserve the memory of the struggle for civil rights.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.